The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
Latest Article

The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
More Recent Articles
Contrast Training for Size
By: Lee Boyce
An Interview with Marianne Kane of Girls Gone Strong
By: Jordan Syatt
What Supplements Should I be Taking? By: Jay Wainwright
Bench Like a Girl By: Julia Ladewski
Some Thoughts on Building a Big Pull By: Christopher Mason

Facebook Join Facebook Group       Twitter Follow on Twitter       rss Subscribe via RSS
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    247

    Am I adding enough weight to the bar?

    I'll use bench press as an example. Say I do 4x8 and successfully complete all 4 sets, for my next workout I add 3lbs to the bar and do 4x8. Is this enough of an increase, or should I be looking to shock my body by going for a greater increase, say by adding 10lbs to the bar and trying for the same number of reps and sets?
    By adding small weight increases I'm making good progress and I can continually add more weight week by week, but I'm wondering if I would get better results (mass gains) by pushing my body a little more.
    Thanks.
    Last edited by Gilles1975; 07-31-2008 at 06:08 AM.

  2.    Support Wannabebig and use AtLarge Nutrition Supplements!


  3. #2
    SchModerator ZenMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    5,480
    while you are making gains I would keep the increments relatively small. make sure you are as developed as you can be for the next jump up. on the converse make sure you are giving yourself enough resistance so that you are really working for that last rep... and completing it. good luck
    Sarvamangalam!

  4. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    247
    It seems to vary with different body parts. For overhead press I find smaller increments to be enough and it's a struggle (as it should be), but for chest and biceps, small increases don't seem to really tax me.

  5. #4
    Senior Member McLaughlin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Superior, WI
    Posts
    738
    In that case you should take a larger jump on chest/biceps to get to a point where it is challenging. Once you find that point, you can revert to the micro loading as needed.

    That's what I think anyway.

    Trying not to die young.

  6. #5
    Raytheon FeelMyLats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    44
    I agree with Zen. If you do however go up in weight to the point you can't finish out your sets, I'd say continue with that weight until you can do it, with enough gas in the tank to do a bit more. Then you'll know you can go up a few pounds.
    Bench: 300
    Squat: 345
    Power Clean: 245

    "What we face may look insurmountable. But I learned something from all those years of training and competing. I learned something from all those sets and reps when I didn't think I could lift another ounce of weight. What I learned is that we are always stronger than we know." -Arnold

  7. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    3,119
    Quote Originally Posted by Gilles1975 View Post
    but I'm wondering if I would get better results (mass gains) by pushing my body a little more.
    That will be done with a fork, not a barbell.

  8. #7
    SchModerator ZenMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    5,480
    Quote Originally Posted by Reko View Post
    That will be done with a fork, not a barbell.
    he's asking about set/reps not caloric intake
    Sarvamangalam!

  9. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    247
    Quote Originally Posted by Reko View Post
    That will be done with a fork, not a barbell.
    I'm perfectly aware that diet is the most important factor for growth, but it isn't the ONLY factor. I'm looking to maximize all factors, is there something wrong with that?

  10. #9
    Lifting Archon. Shouji's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    372
    Nothing wrong with that man, but it's important to remind us of priorities. Diet first, than lifting.

  11. #10
    The Flyfisher rbtrout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    So. Cal.
    Posts
    2,189
    I just went over this very thing with a guy at the gym this morning. He was doing 3 sets of 6 reps of squats. 6 very easy reps, he wasn't working, at all. I told him to up the weight so that the last few reps were harder and then if he got all 3 sets of 6 reps done, then next week add 10-20 pounds.
    Give chalk a chance.


    49 years old

    665 squat
    700 deadlift
    325 bench

Similar Threads

  1. Amount of protein
    By syntekz in forum Diet and Nutrition
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 02-03-2010, 03:51 PM
  2. Creation of a explosive Mofo!
    By Blitzforce in forum Member Online Journals
    Replies: 3612
    Last Post: 01-29-2010, 09:26 PM
  3. Brink's Unified Theory of Nutrition
    By Severed Ties in forum Diet and Nutrition
    Replies: 65
    Last Post: 07-29-2006, 06:58 PM
  4. Is this a good way to improve bench strength?
    By Patriot54 in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 01-16-2005, 06:12 PM
  5. increase weight on bar every week or not?
    By vegetapower in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-26-2004, 02:26 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •