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Thread: Weightlifting prime?

  1. #1
    Feasting Viking_Power's Avatar
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    Weightlifting prime?

    At what age would you say a weight lifter reaches his prime? Also, once one reaches their prime, how long can they usually maintain their strength? I've googled this, and get different answers so I just wanted the opinion of some of the lifters in here.
    Age: 24
    Height: 5'11"
    Weight: 215
    Deadlift: 460
    Status: Bulking

  2. #2
    Senior Member McLaughlin's Avatar
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    I was always told growing up that I'd never have more potential than when I was 18... no matter how strong I got afterwards, I always could have been stronger at 18.

    Not sure if that was true, or if it was just my dad blowing smoke... but it's interesting to think about.

    Trying not to die young.

  3. #3
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    In their mid to late 30's is my guess, from what I have seen.

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    Also, just because someone is past their "prime" doesn't mean they instantly become weak, just that the forces acting against you will be rougher. Otherwise all the top PLers would be 18 year old kids, but they aren't.

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    <----------Still waiting for his "prime"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Viking_Power View Post
    At what age would you say a weight lifter reaches his prime? Also, once one reaches their prime, how long can they usually maintain their strength?
    I'm not criticizing your question, but why are you asking? Does it really matter? No matter what age, you can make progress and get stronger. Don't be looking for any excuses.

    Since I've switched my workout from more of a BB type to the westside barbell template, I feel like I'm as strong as I was when I was in my 20's, maybe ( probably ) stronger. Maybe its just that I *AM* passed my "prime" ( or what people would say that it *should* be ), but I don't think about the answer to your question. It's irrelevant to me, and I'm sure it is to all the good 40+ lifters I see. ( I was surprised at the average age of the lifters in my first meet last weekend. There's were lots of really good lifters that were 40+. )
    Last edited by BigTallOx; 08-27-2008 at 10:34 PM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member BFGUITAR's Avatar
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    Early to mid thirties for sure. Men naturally get stronger from 18-30. On average, I would say 30 year olds have greater brute strength than 18 year olds.

    Things like flexibility, speed, agility, reflexes... they all start to decline by the mid-late 20s. So on average, 18 year olds would have better cardiovascular strength than 30 year olds.

  8. #8
    The Flyfisher rbtrout's Avatar
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    I got your back, Big Tall Ox!

    I'm stronger now than I've ever been in my life......and still gaining. Maybe I'm a bit slower, maybe I can't jump quite as high, but I weigh double what I did when I was 18. Now when I jump in bball, I take people up with me.
    Give chalk a chance.


    49 years old

    665 squat
    700 deadlift
    325 bench

  9. #9
    Feasting Viking_Power's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbtrout View Post
    I got your back, Big Tall Ox!

    I'm stronger now than I've ever been in my life......and still gaining. Maybe I'm a bit slower, maybe I can't jump quite as high, but I weigh double what I did when I was 18. Now when I jump in bball, I take people up with me.

    LOL, that's great.

    I wasn't trying to make any excuses, I just was wondering. I'm 24 now and I want to have an idea of when I can expect to see some of my strongest lifts.
    Age: 24
    Height: 5'11"
    Weight: 215
    Deadlift: 460
    Status: Bulking

  10. #10
    The Flyfisher rbtrout's Avatar
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    Just keep lifting! It will be one of the best things you can do for yourself.
    Give chalk a chance.


    49 years old

    665 squat
    700 deadlift
    325 bench

  11. #11
    Feasting Viking_Power's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbtrout View Post
    Just keep lifting! It will be one of the best things you can do for yourself.

    Thats my plan. Thanks.
    Age: 24
    Height: 5'11"
    Weight: 215
    Deadlift: 460
    Status: Bulking

  12. #12
    Senior Member HeavyBomber's Avatar
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    I have been lifting for 20 years (since I was eighteen)... yeah that means I'm 38 and I am still setting PR's.

    Myself aside...

    I think the average age of WSM qualifiers is 32 with the oldest among them in their early 40's.

  13. #13
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    I would say they peak in the early fourties, almost 30 now im in the best shape i have ever been in, except for runnign as i havent been doing that lately, but if i did on a regular basis i think i could be at here i was at in my teens.

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    Banned MPB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HeavyBomber View Post
    I have been lifting for 20 years (since I was eighteen)... yeah that means I'm 38 and I am still setting PR's.

    Myself aside...

    I think the average age of WSM qualifiers is 32 with the oldest among them in their early 40's.
    HeavyBomber, can I ask you how does it feel like to look back when you were eighteen or perhaps in your early 20s. Every year, I look back and it amazes me how much I learn and how stupid my training was like. Being only 19 yrs old, I can't even imagine what it'd feel like for you to look back in your early days.
    Last edited by MPB; 08-28-2008 at 12:47 PM.

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    Senior Member HeavyBomber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MightyPitbull View Post
    HeavyBomber, can I ask you how does it feel like to look back when you were eighteen or perhaps in your early 20s. Every year, I look back and it amazes me how much I learn and how stupid my training was like. Being only 19 yrs old, I can't even imagine what it'd feel like for you to look back in your early days.

    Let me think on this dude. I'll get back to you.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by HeavyBomber View Post
    I have been lifting for 20 years (since I was eighteen)... yeah that means I'm 38 and I am still setting PR's.

    Myself aside...

    I think the average age of WSM qualifiers is 32 with the oldest among them in their early 40's.
    Odd Haugen is in his 50's

  17. #17
    Lucas
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    When I was in my late 20's, I thought I remember reading somewhere that men reached their peak strength at age 29, on average. So when I hit 29, I managed to finally bench 300 lbs. I'm sure there was a psychological thing going on then. Then I got busy in life and stopped lifting for many years.

    Now I'm 37 and recently hit 345 lbs. on the bench for a few reps. The simple fact is I am stronger overall now than where I was in my 20's. I'm also about 60 lbs. heavier now, but over the last few months have been losing weight and still increasing my strength. On the other hand, I have learned a lot about better lifting techniques in the last year that undoubtedly would have helped me lift more in my younger years.

    Anyway, I hope I can get stronger well into my 40's, and from what I've been reading here, it's possible. So I think you've got many many years of continual strength increases ahead of you if you work hard.

    I hope that helps.

  18. #18
    mind/body zen's Avatar
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    "man strength"

    Even though your test levels are higher in late teens, it just seems like most guys get stronger from their late 20s and into their 30s.
    'In order to alter the inertial mass of weights, you must become one with them, like a machine, the totality of your motion is as one'

  19. #19
    The Flyfisher rbtrout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zen View Post
    "man strength"

    Even though your test levels are higher in late teens, it just seems like most guys get stronger from their late 20s and into their 30s.
    .......and 40s.........

    At 45, I look back at training (since I was 13) and realize I had a decent foundation, but decided to "try too many things". If I knew then what I know now, I'd have been bigger by high school.
    Give chalk a chance.


    49 years old

    665 squat
    700 deadlift
    325 bench

  20. #20
    Breaker of Skulls Guido's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Moore View Post
    Odd Haugen is in his 50's
    I met Odd at last year's WABDL Worlds. Great guy. I saw him pull 720lbs in just a belt. Impressive.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MightyPitbull View Post
    HeavyBomber, can I ask you how does it feel like to look back when you were eighteen or perhaps in your early 20s. Every year, I look back and it amazes me how much I learn and how stupid my training was like. Being only 19 yrs old, I can't even imagine what it'd feel like for you to look back in your early days.
    I think it is important to think about where you are at and what you are doing rather than where you where and what you were doing.

    For every day you lift heavier than the last, I would say you are in your prime.
    The average is the borderline that keeps mere men in their place. Those who step over the line are heroes by the very
    act. Go. - H. Rollins

  22. #22
    My own personal trainer dumbbell's Avatar
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    Just finished reading an interview on criticalbench.com with Ed Coan. I believe that he's around 45 yrs. old and he's still talking about setting new PR's.

    I'm 36 and still fairly new to the iron game, but already I'm stronger than I was at 20.

    So, for me, TODAY is my prime time. And when tomorrow becomes today I will be even more prime then.

    At your age just look at these years as "warm-up sets". Bigger things are yet to come.
    Jason

    It is currently a fad, at this writing, for boys to think they need a "six pack", although most of them don't have an ice chest to put it in.
    -Mark Rippetoe

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