The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

It’s no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    decease, RIP
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    Changing routine every 4 weeks?

    is that to often?

    The plan was to change every 8 weeks. I have two routines and one of the will not work well in the gym I'm using this summer so I'm trying to time things for that....
    big.

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  3. #2
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    If you're progessing why switch? Install the new routine when you change gyms.
    Last edited by Horseman; 03-30-2002 at 12:51 PM.
    H

  4. #3
    decease, RIP
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    The gym is very small and they don't have much equipment. And I want to use the same routine that I'm currently using. If I don't switch it means I will be using the same routine for 4½months more or less.
    big.

  5. #4
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    I agree. This means that you'll need to locate a gym that will serve you needs if possible. Otherwise a routine switch appears to be on the horizon
    H

  6. #5
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    Although many people on here will argue with me, I feel it is very necessary to change your routine from time to time to keep progress more consistent in terms of hypertrophy. How often you change depends on how long you have been training among other factors. The more advanced you are the more often you will need to change. Every 8 weeks is fine for an intermediate trainer...1-3 years of training.

  7. #6
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    While I keep the core of my routine the same, every 2 weeks or so I will make slight alterations (supersets, submax days, +/- reps). Nothing upending, though the shock troops are being sent in. So to a certain extent I agree with you gopro though I still say paradoxically, stay with what makes you progress
    H

  8. #7
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    Horseman...I also agree with what you do. Many people just stick with the basic 3 sets of 10-12, using the same lifting speed, program design, intensity techniques, etc.

    Many fail to utilize the multiple training possibilities like supersets, superslow, drop sets, wave loading, whatever...so the only way to get them to make a change is by switching exercises.

  9. #8
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
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    Which, in many cases, isn't what they need.

    Adding weight or adding a rep is all the change you need.

    When you can't do that any longer, or your goals change, then change in your routine is in order.
    Squats work better than supplements.
    "You know, if I thought like that, I'd never put more than one plate on the bar for anything, I'd never use bands or chains, I'd never squat to parallel or below, and I'd never let out the slightest grunt when I lift. At some point in your lifting career (assuming you're planning on getting reasonably strong and big), you're going to have to accept that most people think you are some kind of freak." -Sensei
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  10. #9
    decease, RIP
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    ok thanks for the replies guys. I think I'll keep to my 8 week plan and figure something out for the summer months. I will only use that gym once a week.

    Well with my limited experience I find variation helps alot, and adding weight week after week on the same exercise is very hard mentally. In the past I have gone way to long with the same routine.
    big.

  11. #10
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    Originally posted by Paul Stagg
    Which, in many cases, isn't what they need.

    Adding weight or adding a rep is all the change you need.

    When you can't do that any longer, or your goals change, then change in your routine is in order.
    Once you leave the beginner, lower intermediate stage, simply adding weight or another rep is often not enough.

    In your first year or two of training I would agree with you.

  12. #11
    Mystic Eric
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    Go pro, what peturbs me is that you keep saying that progression is only enough for people that have been lifting for 2 years or under. In reality, most trainees are not big and strong after 2 years.

    Unless you have gotten big and strong, the basics are all you need. If you're not big and strong, all your "advance" techniques wouldn't do what the basics can't do. In fact, the basics are even better!
    Last edited by Mystic Eric; 03-31-2002 at 01:09 PM.

  13. #12
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    You misunderstand M Eric...the basics should always form the core of your program. In my 15 years of training, I have never stopped doing deads, bench press, leg presses, dumbell presses, bent rows, squats, etc. Also, up until a couple of years ago my main goal was to keep adding weight in all of my movements as well. I am also NOT saying that "fancy" techniques should be used at every workout, but after a few good years of training they should begin to be explored.

    People go wrong by using the same exercises over and over for years, using the same rep patterns, in the same order, etc, etc...and their body's never change.

    I don't know if this is laziness, ignorance, or the fear that if they miss doing bench press just once, they will drop 30 lbs in the movement.

    Sorry you are perturbed by the way.

  14. #13
    Mystic Eric
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    Originally posted by gopro
    You misunderstand M Eric...the basics should always form the core of your program. In my 15 years of training, I have never stopped doing deads, bench press, leg presses, dumbell presses, bent rows, squats, etc. Also, up until a couple of years ago my main goal was to keep adding weight in all of my movements as well. I am also NOT saying that "fancy" techniques should be used at every workout, but after a few good years of training they should begin to be explored.

    People go wrong by using the same exercises over and over for years, using the same rep patterns, in the same order, etc, etc...and their body's never change.

    I don't know if this is laziness, ignorance, or the fear that if they miss doing bench press just once, they will drop 30 lbs in the movement.

    Sorry you are perturbed by the way.
    Go pro, Let's say this 17 year old has been training for 2 years and is 160. He benches 175, squats 200, and deadlifts 225 as his maxes. Do you really think that a skinny weak guy would benefit from doing your "advanced" techniques, or by simply using the basics for a long while until he gets big and strong (pending that those are his goals)?

    Well I say that the trainee would benefit most from doing the basics as hypertrophy occurs when one applies a load greater than a certain threshold point that will force the muscles to adapt and grow.

  15. #14
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    Oddly enough, to me its seems as if Stagg and gopro are saying the same thing to a certain extent (within reasonable bounds of course).


    @ gopro

    It's funny you mentioned that because I have been known to suffer from occasional bouts of paranoia.
    H

  16. #15
    Mystic Eric
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    Also, I am not annoyed with you as an individual go pro, I'm only annoyed at some of the things you preach. I don't want some little 160 pound guy that has been training for 2 years yet still puts up panzy weights to read your posts and run off to the gym trying those "advanced" techniques hoping that he will be big and strong.

  17. #16
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    Originally posted by Horseman
    Oddly enough, to me its seems as if Stagg and gopro are saying the same thing to a certain extent (within reasonable bounds of course).


    @ gopro

    It's funny you mentioned that because I have been known to suffer from occasional bouts of paranoia.
    Paul and me similar...don't say that to him

    Paranoia is frequent among lifters, lol.

  18. #17
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    Originally posted by Mystic Eric
    Also, I am not annoyed with you as an individual go pro, I'm only annoyed at some of the things you preach. I don't want some little 160 pound guy that has been training for 2 years yet still puts up panzy weights to read your posts and run off to the gym trying those "advanced" techniques hoping that he will be big and strong.
    M Eric...I currently have about 6 sixteen year old clients. They are probably my favorite to train!

    I think you are overexaggerating certain techniques as "too advanced." An occassional forced rep, negative, drop set, or superset is not "so advanced," and will speed progress if used at the right times, not as the basis of your whole workout.

    I will say it again...BASICS will ALWAYS rule, but as you go on you will need to break away on occassion more and more.

  19. #18
    Mystic Eric
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    Originally posted by gopro


    M Eric...I currently have about 6 sixteen year old clients. They are probably my favorite to train!

    I think you are overexaggerating certain techniques as "too advanced." An occassional forced rep, negative, drop set, or superset is not "so advanced," and will speed progress if used at the right times, not as the basis of your whole workout.

    I will say it again...BASICS will ALWAYS rule, but as you go on you will need to break away on occassion more and more.
    Well i agree with that. But with most of your posts, it doesn't seem like that's what you're preaching, so perhaps you could be a bit more clear.

    Also, i'm against you preaching to newbies that changing the routine everywork out is for optimal results.
    Last edited by Mystic Eric; 03-31-2002 at 01:42 PM.

  20. #19
    Mystic Eric
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    Go pro, when you say "clients" do they pay you to train them?

  21. #20
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    Originally posted by Mystic Eric
    Go pro, when you say "clients" do they pay you to train them?
    Clients pay...no, I like to work 10 hours a day for free...OF COURSE THEY PAY!! I have been a PT in my own business since I'm 20 years old...I'd be broke if I did it for free. In fact, I recently started coaching online...and guess what...they pay too

    And as to what you said about me preaching to newbies that they change at every workout...if you truly have been following my posts you would know that that is something I recommend only to VERY advanced trainees.

  22. #21
    decease, RIP
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    Just because you can't bench 300 squat 400 etc. doesn't mean you can't benefit from changing routine, rep range....
    big.

  23. #22
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
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    You almost never make that clear. In another thread you tell an obvious newbie to change his routine every week
    Squats work better than supplements.
    "You know, if I thought like that, I'd never put more than one plate on the bar for anything, I'd never use bands or chains, I'd never squat to parallel or below, and I'd never let out the slightest grunt when I lift. At some point in your lifting career (assuming you're planning on getting reasonably strong and big), you're going to have to accept that most people think you are some kind of freak." -Sensei
    "You're wrong, and I have a completely irrelevant pubmed abstract that may or may not say so." - Belial
    I has a blog.
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  24. #23
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    Originally posted by Paul Stagg
    You almost never make that clear. In another thread you tell an obvious newbie to change his routine every week
    Sometimes I advocate a cyclical approach where the routine will be changed in 2 or 3 week cycles, but not simply change every week...example...

    A, B, C, A, B, C

    not...

    A, B, C, D, E, F, etc

  25. #24
    Baby Seal Clubber ElPietro's Avatar
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    I don't understand all the change of routine questions. If you have a goal and you are constantly moving towards that goal why would you change anything? Just for sh!ts and giggles? The saying, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it," is definitely applicable. Changing things just makes you begin at the neural adaptation phase again if you are starting entirely new movements. This means less overall muscle stimulation which means less overall progress.

    If you are getting bigger and stronger on a current routine I see no reason to switch unless you have new goals, or some outside factor changes, such as equipment availability.

    With all the changes in a routine how on earth can you ever accurately determine whether you are really progressing or not anyway?

    This argument is old, but the answer seems so obvious. I don't know why we have such difficulty coming to an agreement. Changing for the sake of change is generally pointless, and in my opinion can be counter-productive.
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  26. #25
    decease, RIP
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    I don't really measure my progress in strength, I only use it as a target to beat for next workout.

    Changing routine is something I feel works very well for me right now.
    big.

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