The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

It’s no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Why you should get strong before trying to get big

    Here's a little article I wrote up yesterday and posted it on another forum I go on. I figured I'd post it here too.

    This is no new ground-breaking information really, but it's my basic understanding of why you must get stronger to get bigger. My current beliefs on the "way to train" come from my 10 or so years of weightlifting experience (not all good training years BTW, but you learn from experience), several books, both bodybuilding and powerlifting forums, and lots of internet articles. After sifting through all the available information, and formulating many thoughts of my own, I have came up with several beliefs of my own. Here they are:

    1.) You have to get stronger to get bigger.

    This first point is just a generalized version of my philosophies, further points will explain why in more detail.

    I know there are certain rep ranges that are specifically meant for strength gains, and others that are meant for size gains, and others that are meant for endurance. Typically 1 - 5 reps is for strength, 6 - 12 is for hypertrophy, and 12 or more is for endurance. Obviously, these rep ranges overlap. For instance, you can and will still gain size by working in the "strength" range, and you can and still will gain strength in the "hypertrophy range", and you can still gain some size and strength in the "endurance range", etc.... Basically they aren't an exact science. No rep range will do just one thing for you, but certain rep ranges will do certain things better than others.

    The main point is that in order to get bigger you will have to start moving more weight. You can train in the "hypertrophy" range all you want, but your body will quickly adapt to the weight you are using for whatever rep range you are training in, and you will need to put more weight onto the bar.

    2.) Increasing tonnage is the key to growth

    The more work your body is capable of handling in a single training session, the stronger you are because of the adaptations you have created.

    Volume = sets * reps
    Tonnage = volume * weight used

    One way to significantly increase the tonnage in a workout is by increasing the volume. For instance, let’s say that a lifter is capable of squatting 500 lbs. for his 1RM.

    He could do either one of two workouts for example:

    Workout 1: 5 sets of 5 w/ 450 lbs. (using 90% of his 1RM in training)

    Volume for workout 1 = 25 total reps
    Tonnage for workout 1 (total reps x weight used) = 11,250 lbs.

    Workout 2: 5 sets of 10 w/ 400 lbs. (using 80% of his 1RM in training)

    Volume for workout 2 = 50 total reps
    Tonnage for workout 2 = 20,000 lbs.

    The tonnage is increased significantly in workout #2. Both workouts use 5 working sets, and even though workout #2 uses less weight, the fact that the volume is significantly higher (due to the higher rep range used), the tonnage was increased.

    It is for this reason why a workout consisting of 5 sets of 10 would be considered a "hypertrophy" workout. The weight is moderately heavy yet still challenging, but the volume is drastically increased because the number of reps used for each set was increased, therefore making the volume factor of the equation 50 as opposed to 25 as in workout 1.

    After this one squat workout with a total tonnage of 20,000 your body will adapt. You will then need to increase the total tonnage at some point in order to create new adaptations. This can be done by either:

    a.) increasing the number of sets
    b.) increasing the number of reps
    c.) increasing the weight used

    a.) If the number of reps is increased and everything else remains the same, then the weight will most likely have to be lowered (which won’t help to increase the total tonnage). If both the weight and sets both remain the same, and one rep is added every workout. The tonnage will increase at a fairly fast rate. The body will get fatigued very quickly, and stalling will occur

    example:
    week 1 - 400 lbs. - 5 x 10 - tonnage = 20,000
    week 2 - 400 lbs. - 5 x 11 - tonnage = 22,000
    week 3 - 400 lbs. - 5 x 12 - tonnage = 24,000

    b.) If the number of sets is increased and everything else remains the same, then the tonnage will dramatically increase. Again, this will lead to a very fast burnout, even faster then the previous example.

    example:

    week 1 - 400 lbs. - 5 x 10 - tonnage = 20,000
    week 2 - 400 lbs. - 6 x 10 - tonnage = 24,000
    week 3 - 400 lbs. - 7 x 10 - tonnage = 28,000

    c.) If the number of sets and reps remains the same, but the weight is increased, the tonnage will increase at a slow and steady pace. The body will be able to make the necessary adaptations, and the accumulated fatigue should not be a serious problem for a while.

    example:

    week 1 – 400 lbs. – 5 x 10 – tonnage = 20,000
    week 2 – 405 lbs. – 5 x 10 – tonnage = 20,250
    week 3 – 410 lbs. – 5 x 10 – tonnage = 20,500

    Example “c” has the slowest increase in tonnage. So why would increasing weight every workout be the best choice of the three to progressively make this tonnage increase?

    3.) Your body is very good at adapting, but it can only handle so much.

    This is obvious, and it is why we need recovery days. The main point of weight training is to make every workout a little bit more challenging the previous workout (this is done by increasing the tonnage). Considering the fact that we are only human, we cannot continuously make each workout drastically more challenging than the previous one. A drastic increase in tonnage may be possible for one or two workouts, but a stall will occur very quickly. This is known as a “plateau”. Ideally you want to slowly increase the body’s ability to handle it’s tonnage capacity for as long as possible without stalling. As long as the tonnage is increasing every workout, you know you are making progress. While examples “a” and “b” (increase the reps or sets, respectively) are both ways to increase the tonnage every workout, stalling will occur very quickly due to the body’s limitations to only be able to adapt to so much.

    “Newbie gains” are due to the fact that the trainee is not physically capable of working with high tonnages, and therefore it can be increased at a very quick rate. Once a lifter has developed several new adaptations over a period time from consistent training, and they are working with significantly higher tonnages, “periodization” is then necessary in order to continue to make progress.

    Periodization is just simply controlling the overall volume and necessary recovery in order to continuously make tonnage increases. As the tonnages that the trainee is working with continue to increase over time, the more recovery that is necessary. This is why progress in a trainee’s lifting career is non-linear. In other words, progress slows down as the tonnage increases. The heavier the tonnages, the slower the increases occur.

    4.) You should focus on getting strong before focusing on getting big

    The whole point of writing this was to explain my main point – you should focus on getting strong before you focus on getting big.

    If you look at #2 which explains how tonnage is affected by the number of sets, reps, and weights used in a workout, you will see that the example was done with a lifter that has a 1RM of 500 lbs.

    Let’s say that a particular lifter just wants to get big, but he never decided to build up a solid strength base first. We’ll say that this particular lifter has a 1RM squat of 150 lbs. (probably an overexageratted number if he is full squatting, but for the purpose of this example I’ll use 150 lbs.). Since he wants to get bigger, but not stronger he decides that he wants to work in the “hypertrophy range”.

    He decides that he will follow a routine where his goal is to increase the tonnage using a set/rep scheme of 5 x 10 (he may not know that it is “tonnage” that he is trying to increase, but he does know that he wants every workout to be slightly more challenging than the previous workout).

    Obviously, he will not be able to do 5 sets of 10 with his 1RM, so maybe he will start with 80% of his 1RM. Using the same approach from #2 – make slight increases in weight every single workout rather than increasing reps or sets in order to allow progress to continue for a very long time:

    Workout 1: 120 lbs. (this is 80% of his 1RM) – 5 x 10 – tonnage = 6000 lbs.
    Workout 2: 125 lbs. – 5 x 10 – tonnage = 6250 lbs.
    Workout 3: 130 lbs. – 5 x 10 – tonnage = 6500 lbs.

    This lifter started his progression with a tonnage of 6000 lbs. The lifter with the 500 lb. max squat started his progression with a tonnage of 20,000 lbs.

    Now, assuming both lifters are the same height and weight, who do you think is going to be the bigger and more muscular lifter? Obviously the guy with the 500 lb. squat will be.

    If the lifter with the 150 lb. max squat spent just 1 year working his butt off to get his max squat up to even 350 lbs. before he decided to start training for “hypertrophy”, then his progression would start with a tonnage of 14,000 lbs. (this is taking 80% of 350 = 280 lbs. for a 5x10 rep range) as opposed to starting with the mere 6000 lbs.

    Of course, these examples were all done using the squat, but the same ideas can be applied to any of the lifts.

    5.) But what about changing up the workouts all the time, and constantly changing the sets and rep ranges?

    This is a very common thing for people to do, but you still want to make each workout more challenging than the previous workout.

    So say that workout 1 you’re doing a 5x5 workout. Workout 2, you do a 3 x 10 workout. Workout 3, you do a 4 x 8 workout, and then you start the cycle over. You would obviously want the next 5x5 workout (which would be workout 4) to be more challenging then the first 5x5 workout. Since it is a “5x5” workout, the way to make it more challenging (aka. increase the tonnage) would be to increase the weight.

    No matter how you decide to cycle the rep ranges, or change the exercises or whatever, eventually there will be a repeat where you are doing the same exercise for the same set/rep range. You want to make sure that you are using more weight than you used the previous time to ensure that you are still progressing.

    Building up a good strength base FIRST before doing anything simply allows you to be working with higher numbers.

    Why not START your “bodybuilding training” with a 400 lb. squat, a 500 lb. deadlift, a 315 lb. bench, a 225 lb. OH press, etc…? You will be working with much higher tonnages then the guy that decides he just wants to get big right away and is starting with a 150 lb. squat, a 185 lb. deadlift, a 150 lb. bench, a 95 lb. OH press, etc….

    6.) While doing all this training for strength FIRST, you will make some amazing size gains as well

    This is pretty self exclamatory, but if you decide to get strong before doing some serious “bodybuilding hypertrophy” training, you will surprisingly make some tremendous muscular size gains. You will find that even though you were training for hypertrophy all along, you ended up getting stronger too. I don’t think that anyone will mind if they ‘accidentally’ get stronger when they were really just trying to get bigger.

    7.) It will be much easier for a very strong person to get very big than it would be for a very big person to get very strong

    Build the strength first, and the added size will come easy. The opposite is not the case. Basically, my analogy on very strong muscles is that they are just little bubbles of solid potential energy that are waiting to just “explode” with size as soon as the training calls for it (the high volume, hypertrophy training).

    8.) Diet

    Of course you have to eat enough to support recovery and growth. Healthy eating is always a better idea then unhealthy eating. You will simply look better overall when you eat properly.

    Aside from eating healthy, it is always important to remember that fat gains are inevitable when it comes to gaining size. The good thing is that it is a S***load easier to lose the fat after all the muscle is gained, then it is to gain the muscle in the first place. So if you happen to get fat while you’re working to get that 400 lb. squat, 500 lb. deadlift, 315 lb. bench, 225 lb., and OH press, don’t worry. The fat will practically melt off if you go on a caloric deficit.

    It will be much harder to achieve those numbers if temporarily gaining fat scares you though.

    So go get strong!!!
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  3. #2
    Pro Strongman | Moderator Tom Mutaffis's Avatar
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    Interesting article... you can get strong and big at the same time though. Generally the two go hand in hand unless someone is specifcally focused on performance in just a couple of movements (olympic lifters).
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  4. #3
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Yes, I know you can get both big and strong at the same time. I just wrote this because there's a lot of people that had the "bodybuilder mentality" where they just want to get big, but not strong (I don't understand why, but I hear it a lot). Point #6 points that out.
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  5. #4
    Squat Heavy, Squat Often Cards's Avatar
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    is tonnage the same idea as work = force x distance.

    you do more work with a weight you can push faster and for more reps.
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  6. #5
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    I guess tonnage would be linearly related to work. A workout with more tonnage, would also be a workout where more work was done.

    Tonnage is just the weight used * how many times it was lifted total. The answer would be given in lbs. (lbs. * unitless number = lbs.)

    Work would be calculated using the distance the weight was moved. So I guess total work would = tonnage * distance the weight was moved each rep, and it would be in ft*lbs.

    I was just trying to create a theory that I came up with on why it's more beneficial to become stronger before training specifically for hypertrophy. I like math, so I used tonnage to back up my theory. Obviously other factors such as rep speed, rest times, etc... will affect everything as well, but tonnage is a fairly easy concept to understand, and it does prove a point pretty well, IMO.
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  7. #6
    Senior Member berfles's Avatar
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    I used to care only about looks and not much about strength, but as I got older I realized how stupid that was. I see no point in walking around all huge and not even being able to lift decent weight. It's like being a ricer only your body is the stupid ground effects and wing.
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  8. #7
    All Natural Power Lunar Effect's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by berfles View Post
    I used to care only about looks and not much about strength, but as I got older I realized how stupid that was. I see no point in walking around all huge and not even being able to lift decent weight. It's like being a ricer only your body is the stupid ground effects and wing.
    Same here. Strength is the only thing that matters for me. And as pointed out numerous times, if you're moving heavy enoug weight you're going to get big anyway. Whether my muscles are "cut" or chiseled or whatever is of no concern to me. I'm not entering any beauty pageants anytime soon.
    Last edited by Lunar Effect; 12-11-2008 at 12:28 PM.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by berfles View Post
    I used to care only about looks and not much about strength, but as I got older I realized how stupid that was.
    Same here.

    But the funny thing is, is that since I started powerlifting, I've put on tons of muscle and I think I look better now than I ever have.

  10. #9
    small flabby and hairy joelhall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brihead301 View Post

    I was just trying to create a theory that I came up with on why it's more beneficial to become stronger before training specifically for hypertrophy.
    two main reasons - recruitment of dormant muscle fibres and systemic adaption to stress. a stronger muscle can also do more work, which means more adapted stress and stimulation for hypertrophy.

    what you have left out however is that tonnage is directly related to intensity. in fact its generally the best way of increasing intensity gradually. all systems of training work on the principle of doing gradually more work over time, with fluctuating intensity (as you correctly pointed out you cannot keep up rapid increases indefinitely). and yes, this is the same as work done.

  11. #10
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joelhall View Post
    two main reasons - recruitment of dormant muscle fibres and systemic adaption to stress. a stronger muscle can also do more work, which means more adapted stress and stimulation for hypertrophy.

    what you have left out however is that tonnage is directly related to intensity. in fact its generally the best way of increasing intensity gradually. all systems of training work on the principle of doing gradually more work over time, with fluctuating intensity (as you correctly pointed out you cannot keep up rapid increases indefinitely). and yes, this is the same as work done.
    If by intensity you mean %1RM, then no, I didn't leave that out. I showed that increasing the weight every workout is the BEST way to increase the tonnage at a gradual rate.
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  12. #11
    small flabby and hairy joelhall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brihead301 View Post
    If by intensity you mean %1RM, then no, I didn't leave that out. I showed that increasing the weight every workout is the BEST way to increase the tonnage at a gradual rate.
    no i mean increasing work done over time by a specific muscle, whether it be increasing weight, reps, sets, exercises, tempo/speed, or decreasing rest between sets (even reps), workouts, time training, etc.

    good thread

  13. #12
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Personally, I like to be strong AND look strong, but if I had to choose one or the other, I'd rather be strong. I'd rather be like a "sleeper". You know, a car that doesn't look fast, but put it up against a pimped out fast car, and the sleeper would just smoke it.
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  14. #13
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Ya, I'm beautiful on the inside, and that's all that matters.
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  15. #14
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    My only issue with the whole tonnage idea is that it doesn't really work that way.
    The lower in the rep range (and higher the weight) the lower your tonnage will be compared to the higher reps/lighter weights, yet that is what will get you stronger.
    ie 315x6 or 240x20. The 315x6 will have a much better effect on my strength despite being a lower tonnage. Heck, my speed work of 135x3x8 has more tonnage than my 315x6, yet it won't make me grow more or get stronger (directly at least).

  16. #15
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    That's why I showed that the moderate weight, 6 - 10 rep range is typically known as the "hypertrophy" range, because the added reps increases the volume, which increases the tonnage.

    I agree though, I'm all about the lower reps, heavy weight myself. That was the point of writing this.
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  17. #16
    ANVIL POWER Detard's Avatar
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    Credentials? Name? Why do you feel qualified to write an article like this?

    It was an interesting read, but i'm curious as to how you came up with these ideas and what your background is (in terms of medical, physical, education, experience...etc)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Detard View Post
    Credentials? Name? Why do you feel qualified to write an article like this?

    It was an interesting read, but i'm curious as to how you came up with these ideas and what your background is (in terms of medical, physical, education, experience...etc)
    This is a forum. He can write whatever he wants without providing any credentials or name and without being "qualified". If you disagree with anything you are welcome to discuss.

  19. #18
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    I gave my background in the first paragraph. No, I don't have any credentials either, but it's my theory that I came up with. Whether it's right or not, I dunno. This is just my basic understanding of the whole strength/size relationship, and it's basically the methodology I follow.

    Obviously I'm not trying to sell it to anyone, so you could basically consider it a "blog" or whatever.
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  20. #19
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    I thought it was alright. However, I think you should definitely use a different example than you did in umm... point 4? What you said was essentially meaningless. Read it over again. What YOU said was similar to this:

    there's a race to get from the east coast to the west coast of the US...why start driving your Toyota Camry when you could work for a few weeks and then buy a faster car? This faster car will get you across the US much faster!

    True...but the Camry still made it there first.

    I'm not saying the 150# squat kid would get bigger faster. But you were comparing a Camry to a Lambo. Comparing a person with a 150# squat to one with a 500# squat. Make your point using the same individual.

  21. #20
    Ernie Batson
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    I think he meant (using your analogy) they are both Camry's. The 500 lb squatter just has a better engine and the 150 lb squatter just looks "prettier". At least that is what I understood.

    Brihead

    Nice post by the way. I've been telling my kids the same thing for the last six months
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  22. #21
    Senior Member bill's Avatar
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    I thought it was pretty good. It may at least get a few new people to realize getting stronger plays a major part in developing muscle. I think the reason people say they want to get bigger, but not stronger is like, Ronnie Coleman said everyone wants big muscles but they don't want to lift heavy wts.
    Remember, to get big, you have to get strong. The two are interconnected. Lift heavy, work hard, and size will come. Like night follows day. It works. Arnold
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  23. #22
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    He has the same credentials as half (more like 3/4s) the guys who sell bodybuilding ebooks online. At least he is giving his opinion for free.

  24. #23
    Senior Member brihead301's Avatar
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    Thanks guys.

    Ya, this is just my opinion and my basic understanding of it all.

    Xellarz, I don't think your analogy is really a good one. Basically I was saying to get all your lifts up to reasonable numbers before training specifically for "hypertrophy" (and yes, I pointed out that training specifically for strength will give you size as well).
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  25. #24
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    Good thread brah

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