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Thread: How often should I deload ?

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Zorachus's Avatar
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    How often should I deload ?

    I am doing a good routine that has me upping the weight on all compounds a little each week, and move up isolation exercises in weight once per month or so. This page has my current up to date routine, it did wonders for me back in Summer.
    http://www.wannabebigforums.com/show...26#post2059526

    So how often should I take a week off and go light and easy ? Like once per month, or just one week off every 6 or 8 weeks ??

    Thank you for advice

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    Why do you think you need to?

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    Squat junkie Painzer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zorachus View Post
    I am doing a good routine that has me upping the weight on all compounds a little each week, and move up isolation exercises in weight once per month or so. This page has my current up to date routine, it did wonders for me back in Summer.
    http://www.wannabebigforums.com/show...26#post2059526

    So how often should I take a week off and go light and easy ? Like once per month, or just one week off every 6 or 8 weeks ??

    Thank you for advice
    I would only deload if you're not seeing gains any more... why take a week off if you're still seeing gains?
    5'8" 177 (meet PRs) ALL RAW

    Bench - 290 (291) Pause reps Dead - 500 (479.5) Squat - 446 (430)

    Total - 1236 (1168.4)

    Goals: Bench - 280 met 1/19/09 new goal - 300 Squat - 435 met 11/28/09 new goal 475 Dead - 500 met 1/23/10 new goal 525

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  4. #4
    Habingus
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    If your **** is working keep it going. From what I have experienced you need to deload once every 4-6 weeks.
    "I PLAY BY MY OWN RULES"

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    Senior Member Zorachus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dingus View Post
    If your **** is working keep it going. From what I have experienced you need to deload once every 4-6 weeks.
    Thats what I meant. So do it like once every 6 weeks or so ?

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    Senior Member Zorachus's Avatar
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    http://squatrx.blogspot.com/2008/08/...n-to-stop.html
    Not coincidentally, most injuries I've had training were after 3-4 weeks of concentrated loading without adequate recovery - just looking at ever increasing training numbers in a log, without any attention to volume or intensity, gave NO clue or hint that I was heading toward injury. As a very general rule of thumb, most people can go balls to the wall for 2-4 weeks and then it's time to back off. Intentional or unintentional, meticulously planned or "instinctive", it doesn't matter, but fail to back off when your body needs it and you could very well be heading for a fall.

    So this dude is saying deload at least once per month ?

  7. #7
    Habingus
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    Also, deloading isn't a week off, its a light week, you still need to get work in.
    "I PLAY BY MY OWN RULES"

  8. #8
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    "This dude" is saying that if you are doing concentrated loading you will need to back off or vary the training after 2-4 weeks. This is assuming you are training frequently - if you squat once a week, for example, then it would NOT be considered concentrated loading.
    Last edited by Sensei; 12-29-2008 at 06:51 AM.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    "This dude" is saying that if you are doing concentrated loading you will need to back off or vary the training after 2-4 weeks. This is assuming you are training frequently - if you squat once a week, for example, then it would NOT be considered concentrated loading.
    Does a guy that pulls 140 and squats 235* really need to worry about it, period?



    *not that there's anything wrong with that; it is what it is

  11. #11
    Senior Member Jorge Sanchez's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad08 View Post
    Does a guy that pulls 140 and squats 235* really need to worry about it, period?



    *not that there's anything wrong with that; it is what it is
    Agreed.

    Worry about getting stronger. At this point, you don't need to deload until your lifts start regressing.
    Last edited by Jorge Sanchez; 12-29-2008 at 10:00 AM.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad08 View Post
    Does a guy that pulls 140 and squats 235* really need to worry about it, period?
    No. You're right - I didn't know his numbers.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
    Senior Member Zorachus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad08 View Post
    Does a guy that pulls 140 and squats 235* really need to worry about it, period?



    My Squats I go easy on them, and do higher reps. If I tried a 1 rep max, I am sure I can squat 300lbs + easily, the 235 feels very easy to me. I am just taking my time, adding 10lbs per week to the bar. In 6-7 weeks I will be doing 300lbs. Not wanting to injure myself, I rather ramp up slowly take time and do it safe, there is no race to squatting 400lbs for me. I should be doing 400lbs squats in like four months

    And for Deadlift, same thing, that 140lbs feels sort of light, I could go a little heavier for sure, but again just going slow on adding the weight once per week. But Deadlifts still are tough for me.

    I have read your getting somewhere if you can at least Squat 1.5 times your body weight, which for me would be 270lb squats. And Deadlift your body weight which is 190lbs for me.
    Last edited by Zorachus; 12-29-2008 at 07:47 PM.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Zorachus,
    No one is belittling your lifts. The point is solely that people relatively new to lifting should be able to go quite a while without having to overcomplicate their training with periodization, deloading, forced reps, density training, templates, splits, and magic exercises... Simply adding weight to the bar and/or doing more reps usually does just fine for A LOT longer than most people think.
    Last edited by Sensei; 12-30-2008 at 04:36 AM.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  15. #15
    Habingus
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    Zorachus,
    No one is belittling your lifts. The point is solely that people relatively new to lifting should be able to go quite a while without having to overcomplicate their training with periodization, deloading, forced reps, density training, templates, splits, and magic exercises... Simply adding weight to the bar and/or doing more reps usually does just fine for A LOT longer than most people think.
    Very true, I didn't deload for the first 3 years I lifted cause I didn't know what one was. I don't think it really adversely affected me. I do wish I hadn't benched so much.
    "I PLAY BY MY OWN RULES"

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