The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
Latest Article

The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Its no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
More Recent Articles
Contrast Training for Size
By: Lee Boyce
An Interview with Marianne Kane of Girls Gone Strong
By: Jordan Syatt
What Supplements Should I be Taking? By: Jay Wainwright
Bench Like a Girl By: Julia Ladewski
Some Thoughts on Building a Big Pull By: Christopher Mason

Facebook Join Facebook Group       Twitter Follow on Twitter       rss Subscribe via RSS
Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    Wannabebig New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    3

    The older I get.

    As I understand the older I get the harder it will be for me to make and maintain muscle, correct? I am currently 45, and I am getting older... but I also need to lose some weight, like 40lbs. This is also to help with my blood pressure. So I guess I am wondering what are the specifics I should know about returning to the gym after a couple of years off.

    I hurt my back a few years ago when I was lifting, but that turned out to be because of my feet. I have flat feet and they pronate badly. I have since gotten orthotics and really good shoes so my back issues are pretty much gone.

    I also use a mix of HMB, Arginine and Glutamine to help with weight loss and muscle gain.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    thanks,
    Larry

  2.    Support Wannabebig and use AtLarge Nutrition Supplements!


  3. #2
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,905
    Just do a basic routine. Because of your age, you may or may not need extra rest to recouperate. But, only you will know for sure. At 45, I'm sure you could still workout 3 days a week. As far as gains go, you may not be able to gain like you would in your teens, but you can still be impressive compared to other 45 year oldsI'm 46 and still getting stronger.
    _________
    ______
    ___

    Off Road Journal

    http://www.wannabebig.com/logo/alnlogo_white.gif

    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

  4. #3
    Senior Member DMedley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    362
    Recommendation #1. Do not get side tracked with the "Harder than" beliefs. It may be some what slower when you age but it still can be done.

    I workout 3 days per week and two of those days are squats. I am 63 years old and the only supplements I use are vitamins and protein powders. I am slowly dropping fat and adding Muscle mass.

    I would recommend Starting Strength listed in the stickies.

  5. #4
    Wannabebig New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    3
    thanks you guys I appreciate it. I will be heading into the gym tomorrow and see how I do for my first day back.

    Larry

  6. #5
    Wannabebig New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2
    Great Topic!

    I am 50 years old, 6'3, 218 lbs and about 20% body fat. At my last doctors appointment we were talking about training (my doc works out and is a hoss 42 year old) and I told him I wanted to still look good when I'm 60. He said he sees 50 year old guys all the time and theres only a small percentage that look like I do. While that made me feel good I also thought how sad it is that that's the case. It seems guys our age and older just want eat, get fat and get sick.

    While it does take longer to see results and were certainly not going to see the results that we would have when we were 25, It's so damn worth it!

    At home, I have a power rack, bench and dumbells. I squat, I deadlift, I bench and do all the basics because I think thats where you build your foundation and strength. I workout hard. I also travel almost every week. I get my ass up at 5:00 am and head to workout room. Sometimes all they have is a treadmill. I'll do that, pushups, abs whatever.

    Just be careful, follow correct form and don't try to be superman and stay consistant and results will follow. Theres a lot of damn good advice here.

  7. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,680
    Quote Originally Posted by xwindowuser View Post
    So I guess I am wondering what are the specifics I should know about returning to the gym after a couple of years off.
    My advice would be don't be afraid of squats and deadlifts, they're the cornerstone of all good routines. You can still build muscle in your 40's.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    7,645
    Good advice throughout - nice to see you keeping on!
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  9. #8
    "ALL THE WAY" cavman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    13
    I don't know much. But I'm 52 and on the SS routine. The changes I feel and see in my body when I stick with it are amazing. I can't ramp the weights like the book instructs. But I pretty much stick with the A & B Routines + Pullups & Dips. Try to add at least 5lbs per week or two. Takes me 60 to 90 minutes every workout. I use a timer for working sets, 2:30 for compunds and 1:30 for Dips & Pullups. I warm up alot. I put everything into it and sweat like crazy. I see very few people working out with the intensity that this routine requires. I have worn out the SS book just going over all of the ques for lifts constantly, and still do. I have much more confidence in what I'm doing. Going to milk it for all I can. I actually like it. Just strap on the IPOD Shuffle and get into my own little world in the Squat Rack. Which nobody else uses much. And I don't want anybody from my gym/fitness ctr. to find out about this site or there will be a wait!

  10. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Sumter, SC
    Posts
    1,787
    At the beginning of this year I weighed a fat 198 lbs. That might not sound too bad, but I'm 5' 6"... I'm also 43 years old. Trust me, I was a fatty. In 11 weeks I dropped from 198 lbs to 166 lbs. While that might sound drastic, it is only an average of about 3 lbs per week. I did what I needed to in order to win the 'Biggest Loser' competition at work. Part of that was gorging myself at a Chinese Buffet right before first weigh in and sweating off a couple pounds before final weigh in.

    I didn't do much in the way of working out during my initial weight loss phase. My goal was to drop pounds - period. After eight weeks of dieting I began to introduce workouts into my regime. By the end of the competition I was at a legitimate 168 lbs and ready to start lifting heavy again. About 5 1/2 months later I've crawled back to 175 lbs and I've gained a lot of mass and strength.

    Here are my starting numbers:

    BW: 168
    Deadlift Max:335
    Squat Max: 315
    Bench Max: 240
    Military Press Max: 150

    Today
    BW: 175
    Deadlift Max:395
    Squat Max: 405
    Bench Max: 260
    Military Press Max: 180

    Getting older doesn't mean you can't lose fat, gain muscle mass, and add strength. It does mean you have to work smarter, not harder. You don't have the luxury of spending a few years finding out everything that doesn't work.

    Read as much as you can. You'll figure out what sources are good and which ones are just so much snake oil. Find a good routine, stick with it. Listen to your body careful. You don't want to bite off more than you can chew and injure yourself.

    Eat right, work hard, and rest hard.

  11. #10
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station
    Posts
    11
    48 years old here and going strong....or gonna die trying. Progress can still be made at our age. I'm bouncing back after one my worst years injury wise. I had surgery for a torn bicep in November and just recently had another surgery for a torn pec this last June. I was still able to pull a 585x5 last week after only a couple of months after a surgery.

    1. Train for performance, not appearance. Train like an athlete and you'll look like one. If you're getting stronger you know you're making progress.
    2. Work the big lifts...squat, bench, deadlift and overhead pressing. They'll give you the most bang for your buck.
    3. Keep the accessory work within reason. Less is more
    4. Work on flexability and conditioning. What I like to do is some moderate cardio after my weight training session. 30-45 minutes on the treadmill. Then on my off days some higher intensity conditioning work ...ie, tire flipping ( fast and light ) and prowler pushes.
    5. No Sled , Prowler or Tire ??....No problem. Run sprints. Do a 5 minute warm up , then 5 to 10 50 yard dashes with a minute rest between them...then a 5 minute cool down. You may just want to stick with daily treadmill walking until you get acclimated to your new routine and then introduce the conditioning.
    6. Train 3 or 4 days per week...I like to train 1 day on 1 day off...this has always worked best for me recouperation wise.
    7. Keep your calories to 12 x bodyweight
    8. Up your protein....at least 1 gram per pound of bodyweight per day.....1.5 seems to work better, but you need to ease up to that.
    9. I think it's a mistake to blindly follow any one program. Use them as a guideline, don't be afraid to make your own modifications to suit your particular needs and don't be afraid to experiment to try to solve your own training problems.


    Any other questions , feel free to hit me up.

    PDR
    Last edited by PDR; 09-09-2009 at 12:45 PM.
    - Press On !

  12. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    West Des Moines, IA
    Posts
    168

    geezer

    I'll be 47 on the 20th. I'm still 5'10" but I'm now @ 230# w/16% BF. I'm moving more weight now than I did when I was in my 20s. Today I train smart and intense. Back then I overtrained, played grabass, and ate like crap. I'm more acutely aware that I need proper rest and nutrition. Hells bells, I put on weight just driving by McDonalds.

    I did the BGB routine for @ 2 years. I switched over to Wendler's 5/3/1 back in April as my goals changed. I spread the 4 day workout over a M/W/F/M schedule. It allows me time to give the lifts the intensity they deserve while allowing my body to recover.

    The best years are in front of me because I train smarter and I have concrete goals. I now understand the reasoning behind what I'm doing, from lifting to eating, to resting and deloading. It scares me to ponder "If I knew at age 20 what I know now". But things happen for a reason and you move on.

    Good luck in your training. If it was easy, everybody would be doing it. Listen to your body, it never lies.

  13. #12
    big on TONING dynamo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Cockeysville, MD
    Posts
    1,222
    I <3 this thread.
    My journal
    Goal(Current):
    400(335) Bench Press
    600(520x3 2xBW) Dead Lift
    500(495x1) ATG Squat
    Total: 1500(1350)
    365 Front Squat
    consistency and intensity.

  14. #13
    Senior Member Davy_Baby9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by dynamo View Post
    I <3 this thread.
    Hell yeah! I agree.

  15. #14
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by BigTallOx View Post
    .... You can still build muscle in your 40's.

    ahahahaha

    You can still build muscle into your 90's. Get this book or check it out your library and you will highlight every other page:

    "NO More Heart Disease: How Nitric Oxide Can Prevent--Even Reverse--Heart Disease and Stroke"

    It has the real story on L-Arginine & Nitric Oxide from the Nobel winning doctor that discovered what it does for the body... even 40 year olds.

    The best thing I can say as an older lifter is that what you are is in the mind's eye. It will keep you motivated.

  16. #15
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,680
    Quote Originally Posted by He's dead Jim View Post
    ahahahaha

    You can still build muscle into your 90's.
    I never said you couldn't. I didn't say 90 in my post because I'm not 90. I'll let you know in 50 years if a guy in his 90's can build muscle.

  17. #16
    Senior Member DMedley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    362
    Quote Originally Posted by BigTallOx View Post
    I never said you couldn't. I didn't say 90 in my post because I'm not 90. I'll let you know in 50 years if a guy in his 90's can build muscle.
    Now here may be a really great idea: You are in your 40's and I am in my 60's, so we know you can add mass and burn fat at our ages. I think I should apply for a Government Grant to do a 30 year study to see if a person can still add mass when - 70 - 80 - 90 and 100. That would be conclusive 40 year study, should be worth a couple million.

  18. #17
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    26
    45? you're not old man! keep it up, keep working hard! 45 ain't old, you got plenty of iron left to pump!

  19. #18
    Senior Member deeder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,258
    I had no idea there were this many old guys on the forums...

    Haha just kidding! Stay strong you guys!
    Full Powerlifting
    Squat - 595lbs -- 270kg -- Dec. 31, '09 (Provincial Record @100kg class)
    Bench - 374lbs -- 170kg -- Dec 20, '08 (@100kg class)
    Dead - 589lbs -- 267.5kg -- Dec 20, '08 (Provincial Record @100kg class)
    Total: 1537lbs -- 697.5kg -- Dec 20, '08 (Provincial Record @ 100kg class)
    Bench Only -- 358lbs -- 162.5kg -- Nov. 25, '07 (Provincial Record @ 90kg class)
    Bench Only -- 376lbs -- 171kg -- Jan. 26, '08 (Provincial Record @ 100kg class)

  20. #19
    The Flyfisher rbtrout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    So. Cal.
    Posts
    2,189
    I was told several years ago (when I was still in my late 30's) that I could not get big and strong after I hit 40. BS! I've put on more size and strength after I turned 40 than I did before. Both my doctor and cardiologist say (even with a bit of a belly) that I'm in better shape than 95% of the people they see.....especially for my age.
    Give chalk a chance.


    49 years old

    665 squat
    700 deadlift
    325 bench

  21. #20
    "ALL THE WAY" cavman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    13
    WOW! If this thresd is'nt inspiring what is! Just got back from my Squat, DL, BP, and Dips day. Upped the DL #5, got more reps on the dips, everything else had to stay the same. Win, Win, for me.

  22. #21
    Senior Member DMedley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    362
    Quote Originally Posted by rbtrout View Post
    I was told several years ago (when I was still in my late 30's) that I could not get big and strong after I hit 40. BS!
    I was told the same thing when I hit 60

Similar Threads

  1. Dating older women
    By Chickenlegs in forum General Chat
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 05-27-2008, 03:58 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •