The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Songsangnim View Post
    I don't understand how biceps are giving you problems when you bench.
    I don't understand it either.

  2. #27
    Senior Member jtteg_x's Avatar
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    I do some kind of curls (3x8-12) on both my DE and ME bench days. I do it because Westside does it, overall balance shape and in hopes to prevent a bicep tear when doing heavy deads.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by drummer View Post
    Curls as a "functional exercise", bent arms and strongman training.
    I know a strongman competitor on another forum who does log curls.

    Reason to include them:
    -Chicks dig BIG ceps.
    -elbow health
    -biceps are used as stabilizing muscles when Benching.
    -Chicks dig BIG ceps.

    Reasons to not include them:
    -It's to easy to let momentum do the work for me.
    -I suck at them
    -Chin-ups give you more bang for your buck (they hit the back as as well).

  4. #29
    Hungry like the wolf. Dgro's Avatar
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    I guess this is a sort of relevant question. How do you guys feel about Hammer Curls? Doing curls with a supinated (regular / underhanded) grip makes my wrists hurt a lot, so I elect not to do them. I get that the HC grip isn't in as great an angle for recruiting the biceps, but at the same time one can generally do more weight that way. Does that balance it out?

  5. #30
    Senior Member Allen Cress's Avatar
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    Curls have their place just as any exercise but it all depends on the individuals goal, how long they have been training, what they have been doing. Obviously for strength athletes the curl is used more as an accessory movement, but it definitley is needed for bodybuilders. I've done programs that have an Arm day as well as programs where I do 2 bicep exercises twice per week.

    One problem that exists with bodybuilders who want bigger biceps, or any muscle for that matter, is they tend to either do more exercises or try to lift heavier weights, this can make things worse. If we train a muscle and now make it part of a "movement chain" then it must adapt to the strength demands of the whole movement. A chain is as strong as its weakest link. If you make a weaker body-part part of a more fully functioning movement chain, it'll be forced to adapt. And it'll respond with more efficient fiber recruitment and force production over time when called upon for isolation work.

  6. #31
    Senior Member Judas's Avatar
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    I do a ****load ov arms... enough to actually hinder my weightlifting (racking cleans mainly). But i'm still pushing my bench, and strong biceps make for a more controlled bench. The stronger my arms are, the easier it is to lower, pause and control the bench. In fact, recently i've changed my bench set-up slightly to use a bit less lat and a bit more arm, and it feels so much stronger than before.

    Besides, if you want to be just strong... like everyday strong and useful, then you need strong biceps. Bench has got to be one ov the most useless exercises for functional strength, aside from the general level ov upper body power it gives. We all just love to do it. Curls far more accurately replicate things we actually do in our daily lives.

    I train as much arms as my crowded and stressed split (read: my recovery) will allow. As long as i'm still training bench regularly i'll crank out the arms.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judas View Post
    I do a ****load ov arms... enough to actually hinder my weightlifting (racking cleans mainly). But i'm still pushing my bench, and strong biceps make for a more controlled bench. The stronger my arms are, the easier it is to lower, pause and control the bench. In fact, recently i've changed my bench set-up slightly to use a bit less lat and a bit more arm, and it feels so much stronger than before.

    Besides, if you want to be just strong... like everyday strong and useful, then you need strong biceps. Bench has got to be one ov the most useless exercises for functional strength, aside from the general level ov upper body power it gives. We all just love to do it. Curls far more accurately replicate things we actually do in our daily lives.

    I train as much arms as my crowded and stressed split (read: my recovery) will allow. As long as i'm still training bench regularly i'll crank out the arms.
    Ed Coan (who can plausibly lay claim to the World's Strongest Man title) would disagree with the statement I bolded above.

    http://www.criticalbench.com/Ed-Coan.htm

    He does not train biceps directly at all or so he claims. See the interview.

  8. #33
    Senior Member Judas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Songsangnim View Post
    Ed Coan (who can plausibly lay claim to the World's Strongest Man title) would disagree with the statement I bolded above.

    http://www.criticalbench.com/Ed-Coan.htm

    He does not train biceps directly at all or so he claims. See the interview.
    Yeah i've seen that before. I think too many powerlifters cling to that statement a bit too religiously.

    Or so he claims... that might be it. Maybe that was his mindset at that time. I have a hard time believing he didn't train biceps. Maybe he never sat in front ov a mirror and did DB concentration curls (man i'd LOVE a picture ov that...), but i'm sure he hit chins or pull-ups or rows bloody hard enough. Or maybe the guy could BB curl 250lbs when he was 14... who knows?

    What I know is that a lot ov powerlifters could stand to do a lot more arm work. You can see it in their benching.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judas View Post
    Yeah i've seen that before. I think too many powerlifters cling to that statement a bit too religiously.

    Or so he claims... that might be it. Maybe that was his mindset at that time. I have a hard time believing he didn't train biceps. Maybe he never sat in front ov a mirror and did DB concentration curls (man i'd LOVE a picture ov that...), but i'm sure he hit chins or pull-ups or rows bloody hard enough. Or maybe the guy could BB curl 250lbs when he was 14... who knows?

    What I know is that a lot ov powerlifters could stand to do a lot more arm work. You can see it in their benching.

    Dude, I really like reading your posts as they are well thought out, but PLEASE spell the word "OF" correctly. "OF' not "OV". Driving my inner spelling bee crazy - Rant over!!!!

  10. #35
    LittleJake JSully's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris mason View Post
    At the risk of sounding immodest, trust me. I know more than 99% of the most popular gurus out there. I have pretty good size and strength to back up my thoughts as well as access to the best minds in the business.

    People on websites like these have taken a good message and perverted it. The good message is to focus on the compound movements and not single joint movements like curls. That will make you grow. Endless sets of curls, kick-backs, and pec flyes will not make you big and strong. A limited number of sets with benches, deads, and squats WILL make you big and strong all over.

    Now, does this mean accessory isolation work is bad? NO!!!! It means it should be added sparingly as support work for the compound movements. THAT is what will make you biggest and strongest.
    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasG View Post
    This.

    I am so sick of the attitude that all you need to do is Bench Squat row and dead.
    Its about time somebody comes out and says it. Bicep isolation is not the devil.. lol
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  11. #36
    Senior Member skinny99's Avatar
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    Jsully One of the things I have learned is that the people who know that a moderate amount of isolation work can be useful,already know the big lifts work! It is the other 99% of lifters who don't get it! You know the bench,curl,rinse,repeat crowd! In order to get them to believe in the compound movements it has become a mantra to all to just to lift heavy! If you read some of the strongest peoples journals on this site "most" do some direct Bicep and Tricep work!
    "The deadlift is more functional in that itís very hard to imagine a more useful application of strength than picking heavy *h*t up off the ground" Rip

    Max 3x5 Goal 3x5 by 12/31/11 *1X5
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  12. #37
    Senior Member Magilla's Avatar
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    interesting thoughts. I rarely do direct bicep work. My bi's are hit with heavy rows, pullups, etc. For my goals, that is all I need to do.
    Stats: (11/1/2009)
    Ht: 6'1"
    Weight 250#

  13. #38
    LittleJake JSully's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny99 View Post
    Jsully One of the things I have learned is that the people who know that a moderate amount of isolation work can be useful,already know the big lifts work! It is the other 99% of lifters who don't get it! You know the bench,curl,rinse,repeat crowd! In order to get them to believe in the compound movements it has become a mantra to all to just to lift heavy! If you read some of the strongest peoples journals on this site "most" do some direct Bicep and Tricep work!
    true, but it also depends on the individual. This is just my opinion, but the more experience you have, the less those compounds are going to affect your biceps.

    For instance, when I do barbell yates rows, palms up I ***never*** feel it in my biceps. I'm sure there is ***some*** assistance, however, I never feel it in my biceps. I focus on pulling with my elbows so that my rows are not compensated with added bicep assistance. I also feel the same with pullups and chins. I focus on pulling with my elbows and just imagine that my hands are mere hooks gripping the weight. I feel nothing in my biceps.

    I've always been an advocate of bicep isolation, but everyone has always gotten on the soap box and raved of compounds.

    I'll tell you that when I had 19" arms, I did LOTS of isolation.. now my arms are about 18" and I don't do near the isolation... I've recently added isolation again, lol. In my opinion, telling a n00b not to do isolation is silly. Bicep work is fun, they should be able to do 4-6 sets of biceps if they want without getting scolded..
    Jake Sullivan
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  14. #39
    THE 800 QUEST NickAus's Avatar
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    I say do some curls, I never really have and it shows-biceps would have to be my worst body part.

    If they grew easy like my quads I think all the rows etc would be enough but I do need to isolate to hit my biceps and actually just started adding them in.

    5 x 10 once a week should do it.
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  15. #40
    Senior Member skinny99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSully View Post
    true, but it also depends on the individual. This is just my opinion, but the more experience you have, the less those compounds are going to affect your biceps.

    For instance, when I do barbell yates rows, palms up I ***never*** feel it in my biceps. I'm sure there is ***some*** assistance, however, I never feel it in my biceps. I focus on pulling with my elbows so that my rows are not compensated with added bicep assistance. I also feel the same with pullups and chins. I focus on pulling with my elbows and just imagine that my hands are mere hooks gripping the weight. I feel nothing in my biceps.

    I've always been an advocate of bicep isolation, but everyone has always gotten on the soap box and raved of compounds.

    I'll tell you that when I had 19" arms, I did LOTS of isolation.. now my arms are about 18" and I don't do near the isolation... I've recently added isolation again, lol. In my opinion, telling a n00b not to do isolation is silly. Bicep work is fun, they should be able to do 4-6 sets of biceps if they want without getting scolded..
    Jsully read my last line! I think direct bicep work is important at the right time and place in every program.
    If you read some of the strongest peoples journals on this site "most" do some direct Bicep and Tricep work!
    The problem is that "most" novice lifters (me included) are like three year olds. Give them an inch and they take a mile! 4-6 sets of correctly done curls would benefit just about every lifter! However 4-6 turns into a lot more if kept unchecked! You said it Bicep work is fun,fun usually wins over hard,no matter what the final results are! That is why direct arm work gets such a bad rap on this site,veterans know that we noobs love to cop out! This is my opinion of course!
    "The deadlift is more functional in that itís very hard to imagine a more useful application of strength than picking heavy *h*t up off the ground" Rip

    Max 3x5 Goal 3x5 by 12/31/11 *1X5
    Bench (245) (275) 285x1x1 335
    Dead (385)* (445) 435x1x1 505
    Squat (320) (355) 355X1X1 405
    Squat (195) (275) 20 Reppers!
    (950) (1075) 1075 1245 Goals (Not including 20 reps)
    5'10" 288Lbs 02/01/2011 Goal Weight 230 On my way back from a Break!

  16. #41
    Senior Member Meat_Head's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Songsangnim View Post
    Ed Coan (who can plausibly lay claim to the World's Strongest Man title) would disagree with the statement I bolded above.

    http://www.criticalbench.com/Ed-Coan.htm

    He does not train biceps directly at all or so he claims. See the interview.
    Gotta disagree here, you can't rightly say Ed Coan has ever been the strongest man in the world. Strongest powerlifter? In his prime, very well possible. But there is a lot more to being the world's strongest man than squat/bench/deadlift. I'm not referring to just strongman competitions either, although they certainly offer a more balanced test of human strength.

    I'm talking about total, functional strength which the big three don't entirely address. Squats and DLs may be the foundation of strength, yes, but not the finish, they aren't all-encompassing. Powerlifters may not want to hear that, but its the truth. Carry a 200lb sandbag 200 yards and tell me deadlifts and squats fully prepared you for that. Press it overhead 10 times and see how much your bench press training helps you there. Pull a heavy vehicle 100 feet with your feet and a rope and see if your body is ready for it at all.

    I don't want to harp on powerlifting, I have no problems with the sport at all, I'm just trying to point out that you have to train for quite a bit more than a big total if you want to call yourself the strongest man in the world. There are different avenues of strength, many of them have little use for a powerlifter. Ed Coan didn't train his biceps because he was a powerlifter. Powerlifters only need their biceps to be strong enough to stabilize and prevent injury. They don't compete in any strength movements that require even a bit of elbow flexion. So from that, Ed Coan couldn't be the strongest man in the world. He hasn't trained to carry heavy weights, or to get an odd shaped, heavy weight from the ground to the shoulders (two examples of basic strength that require significant biceps strength), overhead pressing, weight tossing/throwing, or any of the various other strength moves. He's only trained to improve his squat, bench, and deadlift. He is and was immensely strong, and if he trained for a strongman competition for a while I have no doubt he'd be great at it, but that's not his game.

    Feel free to disagree. As for curls:

    Reason to include them:
    1. It is good to have strong elbow flexors. What is the best exercise for the elbow flexors? Curls.
    2. If the only reason you work out is functional strength, they are still a good movement to get strong at. Anyone who has ever worked moving furniture or manual labor can tell you how important bicep/forearm strength is.
    3. Women dig em

    Reason to not include them:
    1. Not nearly as much bang for your buck as rows and pullups
    2. While the standing curl and cheat curl are both good strength exercises, most people don't need them to accomplish their goals
    3. They take up time in the weightroom that can usually be better spent

    If you can fit in a few sets of heavy curls, they'll do you more good than harm. If you can't, its probably nothing to worry about.
    Last edited by Meat_Head; 12-24-2009 at 02:06 PM.
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  17. #42
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris mason View Post
    At the risk of sounding immodest, trust me. I know more than 99% of the most popular gurus out there. I have pretty good size and strength to back up my thoughts as well as access to the best minds in the business.

    People on websites like these have taken a good message and perverted it. The good message is to focus on the compound movements and not single joint movements like curls. That will make you grow. Endless sets of curls, kick-backs, and pec flyes will not make you big and strong. A limited number of sets with benches, deads, and squats WILL make you big and strong all over.

    Now, does this mean accessory isolation work is bad? NO!!!! It means it should be added sparingly as support work for the compound movements. THAT is what will make you biggest and strongest.
    This is all that needs to be said really.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by xMeat_Headx View Post
    Gotta disagree here, you can't rightly say Ed Coan has ever been the strongest man in the world. Strongest powerlifter? In his prime, very well possible. But there is a lot more to being the world's strongest man than squat/bench/deadlift. I'm not referring to just strongman competitions either, although they certainly offer a more balanced test of human strength.

    I'm talking about total, functional strength which the big three don't entirely address. Squats and DLs may be the foundation of strength, yes, but not the finish, they aren't all-encompassing.

    Squats and deadlifts are among the most functional of lifts for strength. Sitting on a toilet/chair is an everyday movement and picking something up off the floor is also an everyday movement for many people. These are the most natural functional lifts

    Powerlifters may not want to hear that, but its the truth. Carry a 200lb sandbag 200 yards and tell me deadlifts and squats fully prepared you for that. Press it overhead 10 times and see how much your bench press training helps you there. Pull a heavy vehicle 100 feet with your feet and a rope and see if your body is ready for it at all.

    I don't want to harp on powerlifting, I have no problems with the sport at all, I'm just trying to point out that you have to train for quite a bit more than a big total if you want to call yourself the strongest man in the world. There are different avenues of strength, many of them have little use for a powerlifter. Ed Coan didn't train his biceps because he was a powerlifter. Powerlifters only need their biceps to be strong enough to stabilize and prevent injury. They don't compete in any strength movements that require even a bit of elbow flexion. So from that, Ed Coan couldn't be the strongest man in the world. He hasn't trained to carry heavy weights, or to get an odd shaped, heavy weight from the ground to the shoulders (two examples of basic strength that require significant biceps strength),

    Being the strongest man in the world does not mean you have to have strong biceps.

    overhead pressing, weight tossing/throwing, or any of the various other strength moves. He's only trained to improve his squat, bench, and deadlift. He is and was immensely strong, and if he trained for a strongman competition for a while I have no doubt he'd be great at it, but that's not his game.

    Despite that he could still make that claim. Not that he has or I am saying he is. I am stating it is plausible.

    Feel free to disagree. As for curls:

    Reason to include them:
    1. It is good to have strong elbow flexors. What is the best exercise for the elbow flexors? Curls.

    Chins and pullups also work the elbow flexors and harder than a curl.


    2. If the only reason you work out is functional strength, they are still a good movement to get strong at. Anyone who has ever worked moving furniture or manual labor can tell you how important bicep/forearm strength is.

    A strong back and legs are far more important. It's funny that you mention those two specific jobs...I've done both for summer jobs when I was in university and high school...so I should know.

    3. Women dig em

    Actually biceps constantly rate way down on polls when it comes to women's taste. Glutes are far and away the number one bodypart they check out. What 2 exercises builds glutes the best? Hint neither are curls

    Reason to not include them:
    1. Not nearly as much bang for your buck as rows and pullups
    2. While the standing curl and cheat curl are both good strength exercises, most people don't need them to accomplish their goals
    3. They take up time in the weightroom that can usually be better spent

    If you can fit in a few sets of heavy curls, they'll do you more good than harm. If you can't, its probably nothing to worry about.
    I agree with these last two sentences.
    Last edited by Songsangnim; 12-25-2009 at 03:38 AM.

  19. #44
    THE 800 QUEST NickAus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xMeat_Headx View Post
    Gotta disagree here, you can't rightly say Ed Coan has ever been the strongest man in the world. Strongest powerlifter? In his prime, very well possible. But there is a lot more to being the world's strongest man than squat/bench/deadlift. I'm not referring to just strongman competitions either, although they certainly offer a more balanced test of human strength.

    I'm talking about total, functional strength which the big three don't entirely address. Squats and DLs may be the foundation of strength, yes, but not the finish, they aren't all-encompassing. Powerlifters may not want to hear that, but its the truth. Carry a 200lb sandbag 200 yards and tell me deadlifts and squats fully prepared you for that. Press it overhead 10 times and see how much your bench press training helps you there. Pull a heavy vehicle 100 feet with your feet and a rope and see if your body is ready for it at all.


    I don't want to harp on powerlifting, I have no problems with the sport at all, I'm just trying to point out that you have to train for quite a bit more than a big total if you want to call yourself the strongest man in the world. There are different avenues of strength, many of them have little use for a powerlifter. Ed Coan didn't train his biceps because he was a powerlifter. Powerlifters only need their biceps to be strong enough to stabilize and prevent injury. They don't compete in any strength movements that require even a bit of elbow flexion. So from that, Ed Coan couldn't be the strongest man in the world. He hasn't trained to carry heavy weights, or to get an odd shaped, heavy weight from the ground to the shoulders (two examples of basic strength that require significant biceps strength), overhead pressing, weight tossing/throwing, or any of the various other strength moves. He's only trained to improve his squat, bench, and deadlift. He is and was immensely strong, and if he trained for a strongman competition for a while I have no doubt he'd be great at it, but that's not his game.
    You really think Ed Coan would have a hard to walking with a 200lb sand bag?
    He would be able to run up stairs with a 200lb bag.
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  20. #45
    Senior Member Meat_Head's Avatar
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    Squats and deadlifts are among the most functional of lifts for strength. Sitting on a toilet/chair is an everyday movement and picking something up off the floor is also an everyday movement for many people. These are the most natural functional lifts.

    Agreed, like I said they are the basis of functional strength


    Being the strongest man in the world does not mean you have to have strong biceps.

    It really does. It'll be a sad day when the strongest man in the world doesn't have strong biceps, and a day that will never come. How could you work up to an appreciable weight in a row or pullup without strong biceps? How could you carry a heavy atlas stone? How could you "powerclean" an anvil or heavy sandbag?


    Chins and pullups also work the elbow flexors and harder than a curl.

    You can't verify this scientifically, and I don't think it is valid at all. The biceps are almost always the limiting factor in curls as they are the primary movers, therefore they tend to fail before other muscle groups, activating more motor units and fatiguing more muscle fibers locally. Pullups are primarily a back exercise, that's just anatomy and biomechanics. If your only goal is biceps size and strength, you should opt for the curl.


    A strong back and legs are far more important. It's funny that you mention those two specific jobs...I've done both for summer jobs when I was in university and high school...so I should know

    Once again, I agree. They are certainly more important, but that doesn't mean that elbow flexors are unimportant. If you carry a couch up some stairs, for example, you're statically supporting the weight in the mid range of the standing curl exercise. If that's what you gotta do are you going to train just deadlifts, or deadlifts and curls. For optimal strength cover all of your bases.

    Actually biceps constantly rate way down on polls when it comes to women's taste. Glutes are far and away the number one bodypart they check out. What 2 exercises builds glutes the best? Hint neither are curls

    Glutes are probably my best body part, but women don't ask men to drop trou and show their cheeks when they want to see muscles, they ask to see your arms. I think its ridiculous how many guys build huge upper bodies and ignore the lower, but it looks just as stupid to have a big lower body and average upper.
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  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by xMeat_Headx View Post

    Chins and pullups also work the elbow flexors and harder than a curl.

    You can't verify this scientifically, and I don't think it is valid at all. The biceps are almost always the limiting factor in curls as they are the primary movers, therefore they tend to fail before other muscle groups, activating more motor units and fatiguing more muscle fibers locally. Pullups are primarily a back exercise, that's just anatomy and biomechanics. If your only goal is biceps size and strength, you should opt for the curl.

    Actually biceps constantly rate way down on polls when it comes to women's taste. Glutes are far and away the number one bodypart they check out. What 2 exercises builds glutes the best? Hint neither are curls

    Glutes are probably my best body part, but women don't ask men to drop trou and show their cheeks when they want to see muscles, they ask to see your arms. I think its ridiculous how many guys build huge upper bodies and ignore the lower, but it looks just as stupid to have a big lower body and average upper.



    Just two things. What is going to train the biceps harder a 50 lb curl or doing chin-ups with that 50 lbs of weight strapped on to your body?


    Having a big lower body and average upper was never part of my argument to begin with. Let's not set up strawmen shall we?

  22. #47
    A gallon a day, everyday! ThomasG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny99 View Post
    Jsully read my last line! I think direct bicep work is important at the right time and place in every program.
    If you read some of the strongest peoples journals on this site "most" do some direct Bicep and Tricep work!
    The problem is that "most" novice lifters (me included) are like three year olds. Give them an inch and they take a mile! 4-6 sets of correctly done curls would benefit just about every lifter! However 4-6 turns into a lot more if kept unchecked! You said it Bicep work is fun,fun usually wins over hard,no matter what the final results are! That is why direct arm work gets such a bad rap on this site,veterans know that we noobs love to cop out! This is my opinion of course!
    We cater to the Novice lifter enough on this site. And if the noob doesn't want to listen to given advice and perform too many bicep movements than its his loss.
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  23. #48
    Senior Member Judas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny99 View Post
    You said it Bicep work is fun,fun usually wins over hard,no matter what the final results are! That is why direct arm work gets such a bad rap on this site,veterans know that we noobs love to cop out! This is my opinion of course!
    See, now THAT is what i dont get. Everyone says bicep work is fun. Maybe it was fun years ago, but now when i hit the gym my idea ov fun is blasting big heavy squats, repping bigass deadlifts, big benches. I wont even start on the olympic lifts... give me the recovery and i'll crank out heavy snatches all day long.

    These days i find bicep work a pain in the ass. They are something to get done towards the overall plan. When i cant fit 'em in in the time i have to work out, i really dont get upset anymore...

  24. #49
    Senior Member skinny99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judas View Post
    See, now THAT is what i dont get. Everyone says bicep work is fun. Maybe it was fun years ago, but now when i hit the gym my idea ov fun is blasting big heavy squats, repping bigass deadlifts, big benches. I wont even start on the olympic lifts... give me the recovery and i'll crank out heavy snatches all day long.

    These days i find bicep work a pain in the ass. They are something to get done towards the overall plan. When i cant fit 'em in in the time i have to work out, i really dont get upset anymore...
    I agree I am always looking forword to my next heavy Dead session! I have learned hard work is more fun!
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  25. #50
    Small guy depotman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny99 View Post
    I agree I am always looking forword to my next heavy Dead session! I have learned hard work is more fun!
    Totally agree. I am always jacked and looking forward to ripping out biiger DL's and Squats then I am doing any isolation exercizes.

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