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Thread: Work capacity

  1. #26
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ELmx479 View Post
    Sled Pulls on “off” days following squats and deads.

    This is the problem with recovery in my opinion. If I do any type of cardio on my off days it wrecks everything. It don't matter how much food/sleep I get if I don't rest (other than walking around all day at work) on my off days. Sled pulls are high intensity so that may be the issue.
    I was doing sled pulls on my off days (following lower body workouts) before and making good progress. Adding them to the end of my regular workouts proved disasterous for me.
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  2. #27
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
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    A quick update...

    I've since added another exercise to each day with limited sets and intensity. I've also incorperated my sled pulls into one of my workout days instead of off days.

    All these changes have been very gradual and have not interfered with my recovery. Things are going well. Here's my current routine:

    5/3/1 weeks:

    Sunday:
    OH Press - 5/3/1 Protocol
    OH Press (65%) - 2 Sets of 10
    Bar Dips - 2 sets of 10
    Chin-Ups - 20 singles
    L-Fly - 2 sets of 20

    Tuesday:
    Deadlift - 5/3/1 Protocol
    Deadlift (65%) - 2 Sets of 10
    Sled Pulls - 4 laps
    Weighted Sit-Ups - 2 Sets of 20

    Thursday:
    Bench - 5/3/1 Protocol
    Bench (65%) - 2 Sets of 10
    Incline Press - 2 sets of 10
    Dumbbell row - 10 Sets of 2
    Curls -2 Set of 20

    Friday:
    Squat - 5/3/1 Protocol
    Squats (65%) - 2 Sets of 10
    S.l.d.l. (65%) - 2 sets of 10
    Heel Raises - 2 sets of 20

    I've also started adding complexes on my deload week. Just hitting the main lift and then some light complexes. I'll report on that later.
    Last edited by Off Road; 01-22-2010 at 08:35 AM.
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  3. #28
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    I posted this to my blog a few weeks ago - I think it's applicable here:

    Recently, I've been doing a five-minute EDT session at the end of my regular training sessions. It's important not to allow it to escalate into a "rush-reps-and-run-from-exercise-to-exercise-constant-attention-to-time-remaining-metcon-workout". Assuming a decent work capacity and done in a less intense manner, I feel it can be a good way to add some training volume and/or work weaknesses WITHOUT significantly impacting recovery .

    The other day, I did the following after a session of kettlebell snatches:

    KB Jerks: x10,10,8,12
    (alternated with)
    Pull-Ups: x5,5,4,8

    Total Time: 4:53
    Total Sets: 8 sets
    Total Reps: 62 reps

    Five minutes. Only five, not more.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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  4. #29
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
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    Thanks Sensei. Valuable information.
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  5. #30
    Strongman Tom Mutaffis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    I posted this to my blog a few weeks ago - I think it's applicable here:

    Recently, I've been doing a five-minute EDT session at the end of my regular training sessions. It's important not to allow it to escalate into a "rush-reps-and-run-from-exercise-to-exercise-constant-attention-to-time-remaining-metcon-workout". Assuming a decent work capacity and done in a less intense manner, I feel it can be a good way to add some training volume and/or work weaknesses WITHOUT significantly impacting recovery .

    The other day, I did the following after a session of kettlebell snatches:

    KB Jerks: x10,10,8,12
    (alternated with)
    Pull-Ups: x5,5,4,8

    Total Time: 4:53
    Total Sets: 8 sets
    Total Reps: 62 reps

    Five minutes. Only five, not more.
    I have used similar protocols to finish my workouts; it seems to be a good way to add some balance of hypertrophy/conditioning work into a strength program without having a negative impact on recovery.
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  6. #31
    Senior Member ironwill727's Avatar
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    Increasing work capacity is a very broad concept. If you mean you want to increase the amount of work you do I say just slowly add more work and reps. If you mean you want to recover faster than you might actually have to back off a bit (mostly on your main exercises). Regardless here are a few things that I find helpful.

    1) High rep work on bw exercises (pushups, pullups, squats, abs, etc)
    2) Not training to failure
    3) Sled and Prowler
    4) Doing your cardio on the sameday as you lift
    5) Doing light cardio such as light sled, walking, elliptical, etc on off days
    6) Active recovery
    7) Slowly increasing volume
    8) Stretching and foam rolling
    Last edited by ironwill727; 01-23-2010 at 03:02 AM.

  7. #32
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironwill727 View Post
    Increasing work capacity is a very broad concept. If you mean you want to increase the amount of work you do I say just slowly add more work and reps. If you mean you want to recover faster than you might actually have to back off a bit (mostly on your main exercises). Regardless here are a few things that I find helpful.
    I already do a pretty good job of controlling the intensity, so I'm more interested in being able to add more volume without overtraining or stalling the main lifts.

    1) High rep work on bw exercises (pushups, pullups, squats, abs, etc)
    I do that.
    2) Not training to failure
    I only train to failure once a month.
    3) Sled and Prowler
    I do that.
    4) Doing your cardio on the sameday as you lift
    I've started doing this but had to be careful of the session length.
    5) Doing light cardio such as light sled, walking, elliptical, etc on off days
    I do that.
    6) Active recovery
    See #5.
    7) Slowly increasing volume
    That's the main thing I'm working on and the one thing that stalls my lifts the most.
    8) Stretching and foam rolling
    I stretch but I don't foam roll.
    Nice list and those are all things that I've been working on by slowly adding them into my routine or increasing them within the routine. It has all helped to increase my work capacity and conditioning. Thanks.
    Last edited by Off Road; 01-23-2010 at 08:00 AM.
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  8. #33
    student of the game Runty's Avatar
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    Everyone else here is obviously quite a bit more informed/experienced than me, but if I may chime in about foam rolling. From my experience it really does wonders to help with recovery. I couldn't tell you the exact science behind it but when lifting heavy and often, after I added contrast showers and foam rolling, my recovery increased rather noticeably. I usually just did a quick 2-3 minute IT band, glute, adductor roll before workouts mostly for mobility and then 2-3 times a week when I could find time do a nice 20-30minute full body foam roll while listening to music or television really helped overall full body recovery.
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  9. #34
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
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    Does foam rolling help with actual recovery (CNS etc.) or is it more for stiffness, pain, and mobility?
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  10. #35
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    I've found it to be more of a help with pain, stiffness, and mobility. I suppose if that helped you relax more between training sessions, it could theoretically help with CNS recovery, but I haven't noticed any difference in that aspect.

  11. #36
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean S View Post
    I've found it to be more of a help with pain, stiffness, and mobility. I suppose if that helped you relax more between training sessions, it could theoretically help with CNS recovery, but I haven't noticed any difference in that aspect.
    That's what I figured, but thought I'd ask. Thanks.
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