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Thread: RoM with Rows and pulling movements

  1. #1
    eek... it's lil' Fixation! fixationdarknes's Avatar
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    RoM with Rows and pulling movements

    When pressing, I know exactly what the Range of Motion should be due to my elbows/knees locking out, but for something like Rows, I don't really know how far I am supposed to be pulling up. Should it be until the dumbbell/barbell touches my waist? Or perhaps should I continue to pull after that, only stopping once the back has been totally contracted and the rhomboids/shoulder blades are touching as close together as possible?

    It just seems really easy to overestimate and think you can keep Rowing when your RoM is sneakily decreasing after each rep, so I need a clear way of knowing when I am at the top of the rep if that makes any sense.
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    Age: 20, Height: 5'7", Weight: 165, Deadlift: 405, 9.5" Squat: 230 x 10, Bench: 195 (3x5)

    Quote Originally Posted by fatrb38
    I try to visualize that my girlfriend is under the weight and I have to push the weight up to save her. Of course it doesn't work and I just laugh as I think about the weight slowly crushing her bones. Then I remember it's me under the weight and give 200% effort to push it back up.

  2. #2
    Bodybuilding Mythbuster
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    Quote Originally Posted by fixationdarknes View Post
    When pressing, I know exactly what the Range of Motion should be due to my elbows/knees locking out, but for something like Rows, I don't really know how far I am supposed to be pulling up. Should it be until the dumbbell/barbell touches my waist? Or perhaps should I continue to pull after that, only stopping once the back has been totally contracted and the rhomboids/shoulder blades are touching as close together as possible?

    It just seems really easy to overestimate and think you can keep Rowing when your RoM is sneakily decreasing after each rep, so I need a clear way of knowing when I am at the top of the rep if that makes any sense.

    You should train in whatever way suits you. Generally speaking if you have no pre-existing injuries and it causes you no pain whatsoever, you should go for a full ROM (although I don't think 1-2 inches more or less really matter). So I'd go with the second way. Whichever you choose just make sure you do it for each rep. So if you touch your waist, touch your waist with each rep. That way you know for sure the ROM is fairly consistent.

  3. #3
    eek... it's lil' Fixation! fixationdarknes's Avatar
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    Thanks man.

    I decided I like the feel of Barbell Rows much better.

    Question About BB Rows, my back is in a rather upright arched position, about 70ish degrees from the ground, and I am pulling the barbell underhand from a bit above my kneecaps to the crease between my hip and abdomen (the lowest part of my waist). I guess it is known as the Yates Row? (maybe I'm wrong though). It feels excellent, only problem being that my rear deltoids seem to be the weakest link in the process, so doesn't that limit my back growth being that it isn't necessarily fatiguing at the end of my set(s)?
    Last edited by fixationdarknes; 03-03-2010 at 04:55 PM.
    Lifting Journal
    Age: 20, Height: 5'7", Weight: 165, Deadlift: 405, 9.5" Squat: 230 x 10, Bench: 195 (3x5)

    Quote Originally Posted by fatrb38
    I try to visualize that my girlfriend is under the weight and I have to push the weight up to save her. Of course it doesn't work and I just laugh as I think about the weight slowly crushing her bones. Then I remember it's me under the weight and give 200% effort to push it back up.

  4. #4
    student of the game Runty's Avatar
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    You could try leaning forward more and pulling to higher on your midsection. I try to get as parallel as flexibility allows to the floor and pull straight into my chest from where ever the bar hangs. Feels like this hits my lats/rhomboids harder. Basically trying to pull on the same plane as I push for bench press. Makes more sense to me to it this way seeing as Pullups and OH press are used to balance and they take place in reverse of each other.
    "Fine, if I'm not allowed to light it on fire, can my imaginary friend?"

  5. #5
    eek... it's lil' Fixation! fixationdarknes's Avatar
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    Hm... other people have given me the advice to pull lower toward my waist as that hits more of the full back area rather than turning into something like a shrug (upper back). Logically this makes sense, the higher you pull, the more upper back and arms it seems to be right?
    Last edited by fixationdarknes; 03-04-2010 at 12:40 AM.
    Lifting Journal
    Age: 20, Height: 5'7", Weight: 165, Deadlift: 405, 9.5" Squat: 230 x 10, Bench: 195 (3x5)

    Quote Originally Posted by fatrb38
    I try to visualize that my girlfriend is under the weight and I have to push the weight up to save her. Of course it doesn't work and I just laugh as I think about the weight slowly crushing her bones. Then I remember it's me under the weight and give 200% effort to push it back up.

  6. #6
    Westside Bencher Travis Bell's Avatar
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    Correct, the higher you pull, the more upper back you're going to feel.

    You'll have to drop the weight a little bit as well.

    Make sure you're getting the full contraction if your goal is to hit the upper back


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  7. #7
    eek... it's lil' Fixation! fixationdarknes's Avatar
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    I am getting a full contraction but the problem is my rear delts seem to fatigue before my back does. Not sure what to do about this.

    Also, about how angled should my back be? It does feel a bit strange in theory that I'm seeminly pulling at a more horizontal angle than vertical due to my back being angled about 65 to 70 degrees from the floor. Should my back be more parallel with the floor? I just don't want my lower back to fatigue too quickly supporting the weight like that.
    Lifting Journal
    Age: 20, Height: 5'7", Weight: 165, Deadlift: 405, 9.5" Squat: 230 x 10, Bench: 195 (3x5)

    Quote Originally Posted by fatrb38
    I try to visualize that my girlfriend is under the weight and I have to push the weight up to save her. Of course it doesn't work and I just laugh as I think about the weight slowly crushing her bones. Then I remember it's me under the weight and give 200% effort to push it back up.

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