The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Senior Member sbirgel's Avatar
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    timing for eating

    I'm new to these forums and have been browsing at the various topics and I had a quick question about diet. I'm at college right now and I usually skip breakfast and a midmorning snack in order to maximize my sleep before class, often not eating till around noon. is this going to drastically affect my ability to gain weight? I usually lift 4 times a week and try to eat healthy and as much as I can at lunch and dinner. thanks for your input
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  3. #2
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    Not at all, some people only eat once per day, others eat 6+. It's whatever works for you really - the key to weight gain is simply to eat more than you take in every day.

  4. #3
    Clean Bulk in Progress james_w8lifter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alyion View Post
    Not at all, some people only eat once per day, others eat 6+. It's whatever works for you really - the key to weight gain is simply to eat more than you take in every day.
    HUH????

    I wouldn't skip breakfast if I were you. It's called the most important meal of the day for a reason. Your body needs nutrients upon awakening because it has been fasting all night while you sleep. Get to bed earlier and then get up and eat breakfast, end of story.
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  5. #4
    Senior Member sbirgel's Avatar
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    ok well if I were to grab a something to eat on the way to class are there any good pre-made options or quick fixes I can make in 5 minutes or less that you would recommend ?
    Age: 20
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  6. #5
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    Whoops, just re-read my post

    Yea I meant to eat more than you expend.

  7. #6
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    I wouldn't skip breakfast if I were you. It's called the most important meal of the day for a reason.
    No offense but this is a catch-phrase coined by the egg manufacturing cartel. :-) Seriously though, there is a lot of controversy on this subject but the research I've read overwhelming shows that it really doesn't matter how you spread your <balanced> calories around; just make sure you get them.

    I'm one of those kind of people that simply doesn't have much of an appetite when I get up. Rather, it builds during the course of the day. I start drinking milk when I get up (which provides calories/protein) then I start eating when I actually get hungry. Your mileage may vary...

  8. #7
    Chubbilicious. VikingWarlord's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by james_w8lifter View Post
    HUH????

    I wouldn't skip breakfast if I were you. It's called the most important meal of the day for a reason. Your body needs nutrients upon awakening because it has been fasting all night while you sleep. Get to bed earlier and then get up and eat breakfast, end of story.
    100% incorrect. Your body does not require anything it doesn't already have when you wake up. The key is overall daily intake.
    If one person can do something, anyone can learn to do it.
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  9. #8
    Senior Member David Trantham's Avatar
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    my question is to all that say , How is breakfast not inportant? after all you body has been sleeping for 8 hrs or so, hear again you have been fasting 6-8 hrs your bodies metobolic rate will start to slow down, the food calories and nutrients from the foods supply energy to the body, plus you need feed for normal brain function, etc. if you want to be a bodybuilder/powerlifter or a healthy athlete and buld lean muscle and keep a heathly lean musclar body i think eatting breakfast is a must!!!! yes you can eat calories later and build muscle but what will you body do with all those calories at once, store some as body fat, will you start losing weight/ muscle for fasting 10-12 hrs. i personally don't want to take that chance. i eat every 3 or 4 hrs to keep my body fuel high, it makes me feel good and i know that eating breakfast jumps starts me each and every day
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  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by VikingWarlord View Post
    100% incorrect. Your body does not require anything it doesn't already have when you wake up. The key is overall daily intake.
    unless of course you want to take your body from the catabolic state into the anabolic state... but maybe you want to just take your time to get around to that?

    a quote from this great article on the neccessity of properly timed food intake, a link to the article below
    "About halfway through the night your body runs out of muscle-building fuel and leaves you in a catabolic state..."Dr. John M Berardi, Ph.D.

    http://www.wannabebig.com/diet-and-n...nsumer-report/

  11. #10
    Chubbilicious. VikingWarlord's Avatar
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    Fasting periods have been shown to lower insulin, raise glucagon and growth hormone, resulting in better regulation of appetite, glucose uptake, increased efficiency in protein metabolism/synthesis, and increased efficiency in energy balance...among many other things. The fact is that the research doesn't support the conventional wisdom.

    In fact, I'll go directly to research:

    1. "Dietary restriction has been shown to have several health benefits including increased insulin sensitivity, stress resistance, reduced morbidity, and increased life span.

    "intermittent fasting resulted in beneficial effects that met or exceeded those of caloric restriction including reduced serum glucose and insulin levels and increased resistance of neurons in the brain to excitotoxic stress. Intermittent fasting therefore has beneficial effects on glucose regulation and neuronal resistance to injury in these mice that are independent of caloric intake."

    Intermittent fasting dissociates beneficial effects of dietary restriction on glucose metabolism and neuronal resistance to injury from calorie intake. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 May 13; 100(10)

    2. "We conclude that CR and IF dietary regimens can ameliorate age-related deficits in cognitive function by mechanisms that may or may not be related to Abeta and tau pathologies."

    Intermittent fasting and caloric restriction ameliorate age-related behavioral deficits in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.
    Neurobiol Dis. 2007 Apr;26(1):212-20. Epub 2007 Jan 13.

    3. OBJECTIVE: To test if a diet of 4.2 MJ/24 h as six isocaloric meals would result in a lower subsequent energy intake, or greater energy output than (a) 4.2 MJ/24 h as two isocaloric meals or (b) a morning fast followed by free access to food.

    CONCLUSIONS: In the short term, meal frequency and a period of fasting have no major impact on energy intake or expenditure but energy expenditure is delayed with a lower meal frequency compared with a higher meal frequency. This might be attributed to the thermogenic effect of food continuing into the night when a later, larger meal is given. A morning fast resulted in a diet which tended to have a lower percentage of energy from carbohydrate than with no fast.

    Compared with nibbling, neither gorging nor a morning fast affect short-term energy balance in obese patients in a chamber calorimeter. International Journal Of Obesity, April 2001, Volume 25, Number 4, Pages 519-528

    4. "A gorging pattern of energy intake resulted in a stronger diurnal periodicity of nutrient utilization, compared to a nibbling pattern. However, there were no consequences for the total 24 h energy expenditure (24 h EE) of the two feeding patterns (5.57 +/- 0.16 kJ/min for the gorging pattern; 5.44 +/- 0.18 kJ/min for the nibbling pattern). Concerning the periodicity of nutrient utilization, protein oxidation during the day did not change between the two feeding patterns. In the gorging pattern, carbohydrate oxidation was significantly elevated during the interval following the first meal (ie from 1200 h to 1500 h, P less than 0.01) and the second meal (ie from 1800 h to 2100 h, P less than 0.05). The decreased rate of carbohydrate oxidation observed during the fasting period (from rising in the morning until the first meal at 1200 h), was compensated by an increased fat oxidation from 0900 to 1200 h to cover energy needs. In the nibbling pattern, carbohydrate and fat oxidation remained relatively constant during the active hours of the day."

    Influence of the feeding frequency on nutrient utilization in man: consequences for energy metabolism. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1991 Mar;45(3):161-9.

    I think that's enough for now. There's plenty more research to validate the IF lifestyle and challenge the ludicrous "eat 137 times a day" dogma that still exists in the fitness world. The fact is that it takes a lot longer than a few hours to hit a hugely negative catabolic state. Most people in Westernized nations will NEVER hit that state. Ever.
    If one person can do something, anyone can learn to do it.
    Do what you've always done and get what you've always gotten.
    There is no failure, only feedback.

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  12. #11
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    This is a controversial topic but carb cycling has worked pretty well for me so far. I suggest you look into it.

  13. #12
    Wannabebig New Member
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    I only have 2 meals a day, I also skip breakfast. I am a gym fitness member, and I can't see any problem with that. Though my schedule is that I'm still sleeping in the morning, and I am awake during midnight. And I do my exercise every afternoon.

  14. #13
    Chubbilicious. VikingWarlord's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xBCx View Post
    unless of course you want to take your body from the catabolic state into the anabolic state... but maybe you want to just take your time to get around to that?
    I realized I never addressed this point. Eating first thing in the morning isn't going to kickstart anabolism. You seem like one of those that thinks it's possible for the body to be in a perpetual anabolic state...and it's not. Anabolism is powered by catabolism. Without the breaking down process, the rebuilding process can't happen. At the most, you're talking grams per day that will be replaced through the heightened growth hormone and glucagon and reduced insulin that happens during a fasting period.

    In addition, anabolism and catabolism don't apply only to muscle tissue. Metabolism is the cycling of those processes to break down and rebuild all of the tissues of the body.

    My main point isn't that IF is better. My point is that its mechanism is different than more traditional methods but works better for some people than more traditional methods. The "eat all day every day" dogma is stupid and research has been shooting holes in it for many years.
    If one person can do something, anyone can learn to do it.
    Do what you've always done and get what you've always gotten.
    There is no failure, only feedback.

    "Journey of 1000 miles starts with a single step".--Lao Tzu

    Pro-Choice...ON EVERYTHING.

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