The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
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    how do you teach someone squatting for their first time good form?

    hey guys.... i am no expert whatsoever (and only 17) but lately people @ my gym have been seeing me squat deep and have been coming to me for advice on their squat. I feel flattered that people older and some more experienced than i am ask me for advice about their form, but at the same time even though i can spot errors i don't know how to help all of the time.

    Today i was doing front squats and this guy came and asked to work in. I wasn't sure whether or not he was doing GMs or squats, and he said it was his first time doing squats and asked me for advice. I told him to keep his whole body tight, heels flat on the ground, and to stick his ass out to start the movement and then descend, and to push up off his heels on the way up. Every time he went down (he could barely reach parallel if that far) his back went down like he was doing a GM. I then told him to keep his head high and look at some sign on the wall, and even though his posture was great it still looked like he was doing a GM..

    It got me wondering what the best ways to fix this problem are. I thought about it when i was showing him how to squat and couldn't think of anything about why his back kept going forward even when he was sitting far back into his squat- any ideas?

    Thanks.

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  3. #2
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    I know what you mean. Sometimes when I go to the gym with my friend, he asks me how to do deadlifts and I try to tell him the best way how to do it, but it doesn't always look really good.

    I guess the only thing you can do is tell them how to do it, and then it's up to them to work on their form until it's good.

  4. #3
    student of the game Runty's Avatar
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    The problem is YOU may not be able to fix the problem. If he has weaknesses that need to be addressed(lower back weakness resulting in GMing out of the hole) it's going to take some time to work those up. He needs to just lower the weight until he has proper form(or as close as you can get right off the bat) and then work his way up from there. It's way harder(and much riskier) to adjust form at a weight he can do with sloppy form than it is to work his way back up with proper form.
    "Fine, if I'm not allowed to light it on fire, can my imaginary friend?"

  5. #4
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    Obviously the further you sit back (i.e. the more vertical your shins are), the more acute your hip angle will have to be at the bottom, and hence a less vertical back angle. Most people tend to have an opposite problem--refusing to bend at the hips to maintain balance, so they simply shove their knees further forward instead.

    Not sure if you're saying he's literally GMing out of the hole, or if you think his back is just too horizontal. The latter probably isn't really a problem--If he's in balance with the bar over the middle of his feet then the back angle doesn't really matter so long as it remains constant out of the hole. If the former, cue him to keep his chest up; don't consciously lift it (this will change the back angle--bad), just keep it tight and shoved out.

  6. #5
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    good points... it was basically as his ass was coming out, his back just involuntarily went into a downward motion like a GM. maybe it's just an issue of flexibility and depth since he's trying to go too low?

  7. #6
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    Probably not. Just needs to be coached to keep his chest out.

  8. #7
    Loves to squat hellagrant's Avatar
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    I say start off with very very light weight with high reps. Simply try to teach the body the correct form. I started off squatting only the bar, just to get the form down. It is really important because if you start off wrong, it is hard to correct it in the future. With a very light weight, the lifter only focuses on form and doesnt need to be concerned about the weight. This has helped me and I believe for someone who only been squatting for a year, I have good form.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRider23 View Post
    hey guys.... i am no expert whatsoever (and only 17) but lately people @ my gym have been seeing me squat deep and have been coming to me for advice on their squat. I feel flattered that people older and some more experienced than i am ask me for advice about their form, but at the same time even though i can spot errors i don't know how to help all of the time.....
    put the bar down and have him practice sitting in a chair or stool. place a chair or stool behind him and tell him to just sit down, it's natural when you sit down you stick your ass out a bit and lower yourself much like you do in a squat.

    with bar on back, stay tight , chest high, when you squat the bar should in straight vertical line, no titing forward.

  10. #9
    Chubbilicious. VikingWarlord's Avatar
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    Watch this and how he teaches.: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kawBY5p29fQ
    If one person can do something, anyone can learn to do it.
    Do what you've always done and get what you've always gotten.
    There is no failure, only feedback.

    "Journey of 1000 miles starts with a single step".--Lao Tzu

    Pro-Choice...ON EVERYTHING.

  11. #10
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VikingWarlord View Post
    Watch this and how he teaches.: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kawBY5p29fQ
    It really is genius and Rip is absolutely 100% correct that most people just don't understand how central the hips are to squatting (and life and athletics). Learning how to squat should be a lesson in how to use the hips, NOT knee extension which is what most newbies think squatting is all about.

    I don't know how many people have told me that Rip is teaching people to do a good morning squat.... NO, HE IS NOT. He's teaching hip drive.

    I would really hesitate to tell others to teach like Rip however, because I think they are going to miss A LOT and simply exacerbate existing issues (like non-firing glutes and quad dominance, lumbar flexion, etc.). JMO.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
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  12. #11
    Chubbilicious. VikingWarlord's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    It really is genius and Rip is absolutely 100% correct that most people just don't understand how central the hips are to squatting (and life and athletics). Learning how to squat should be a lesson in how to use the hips, NOT knee extension which is what most newbies think squatting is all about.

    I don't know how many people have told me that Rip is teaching people to do a good morning squat.... NO, HE IS NOT. He's teaching hip drive.

    I would really hesitate to tell others to teach like Rip however, because I think they are going to miss A LOT and simply exacerbate existing issues (like non-firing glutes and quad dominance, lumbar flexion, etc.). JMO.
    Might be quicker to get people squatting properly by teaching them to swing a kettlebell the right way.
    If one person can do something, anyone can learn to do it.
    Do what you've always done and get what you've always gotten.
    There is no failure, only feedback.

    "Journey of 1000 miles starts with a single step".--Lao Tzu

    Pro-Choice...ON EVERYTHING.

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