The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
Latest Article

The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
More Recent Articles
Contrast Training for Size
By: Lee Boyce
An Interview with Marianne Kane of Girls Gone Strong
By: Jordan Syatt
What Supplements Should I be Taking? By: Jay Wainwright
Bench Like a Girl By: Julia Ladewski
Some Thoughts on Building a Big Pull By: Christopher Mason

Facebook Join Facebook Group       Twitter Follow on Twitter       rss Subscribe via RSS
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 30
  1. #1
    TJW Keith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Pickering, Ontario
    Posts
    3,238

    Considering opening up my own gym -- I need your input, guys!

    I've been considering opening up a gym with Detard (from this site) in the near future. We've discussed all of our ideas and my main concern is how successful it will be based on the clientele. We want to attract a very broad, general population who are "serious" about increasing strength and/or muscle mass so we're not limiting ourselves solely to competitive powerlifters. I know that's basically going to cut out 50% of the population (females), but we're okay with that. The look and equipment we're going for is a warehouse-type gym a lot like Elite Fitness Systems'. It would be equipped with a couple of monolifts, power racks, olympic benches, glute-ham raises, reverse hypers, tires, sleds, prowlers, farmers handles, plenty of chalk, loud heavy metal, maybe some rowers and spin bikes, etc. Ideally, we'd like to make enough income to survive comfortably (at least $50,000 - $100,000) for EACH of us. The location would be near the heart of Toronto. I know it's a competitive market, but I'm thinking this would be successful because our membership prices would be so low considering we wouldn't have such high equipment costs (treads, ellipticals, machines, etc. for $10,000+ each) like every other commercial gym. It's a huge risk, a risk that I'm not entirely sure I'm willing to take. The biggest question that comes to mind, is why hasn't this been done before? There's nothing like this anywhere near Toronto. Do any of you have experience with this? What tips/suggestions can you give me? How successful do you think a gym like this would be in a major, populated city?


    Age: 24 Height: 5'9" Weight: 185

    Gym PRs: 365/240/440=1045

    People need to quit ****ing asking what they need to do, exercise wise, until they reinforce their technique - Dave Tate

    The never-ending pursuit of becoming Strong(er) - My Westside journal

  2.    Support Wannabebig and use AtLarge Nutrition Supplements!


  3. #2
    Westside Bencher Travis Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Westside Barbell, OH
    Posts
    8,933
    Asking why it hasn't been done before is a very good question, however don't be intimidated by being the first person to do this.

    Eventually you guys may be able to make that much money, however for the first couple years, it's un-likely.

    Running a commercial gym is a pain in the neck. I manage one at the moment in addition to owning my own facility. The utilities are twice and 3x's as much more expensive as compared to my facility where I open it during the times when I have groups in there and close it up when I leave.

    You really just need to run the numbers. Figure out how much your rent is going to be, how much your average utilities are going to be (heat, electric and water) and then figure out how many members you will need to have in order to just cover your expenses.

    Then you have to look at the area you're going to put the gym. Look at the local hobby sports. What kind of sports are there? Look at the local gyms to get an idea for what kind of people are there. Does there even seem to be that kind of interest?

    Personally I think going from no gym, to your ideal facility that you want to run is a big risk. Rather why not open up a small facility? Maybe even a key club. A couple guys around here have managed successful key clubs. Your rent will be much less expensive, utilities are less expensive and that lowers your overhead by a significant amount.

    Start small. You can always grow.

    I started in a small facility and now I'm looking at growing into a bigger facility and eventually (few years down the road) I plan on going to a warehouse.

    My opinion, you can definitely do it if you do it slow, be patient, market your gym correctly and don't get too greedy.


    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

    Superior Athletics - Northeast Ohio's Center for Athlete Training
    *Westside Barbell Certified Gym

  4. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1,987
    Try to find a niche. Something your area doesnt have.
    Best Lifts unequipped
    765
    505
    755
    Best lifts Equipped
    1050
    840
    715

    Thankfully Representing AtLarge Nutrition and EliteFTS

  5. #4
    Bad Attitude Gym AdamBAG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    986
    There are a couple of really, really good posts done by Brian Schwab that owns Orlando Barbell. Check the EFS site. He lays out a lot of things to think about for this type of venture.
    750/500/690 APF Elite @ 242

    Bench Only - Multi Ply SPF - 600 @ 275 (251)

    Bench Only - Single Ply USAPL - 501 @ 275 (255)

    Bench Only - Single Ply SPF - 550 @ 259 (257)

  6. #5
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    21
    i was looking at doing this a few years ago, but i gave up on the idea after crunching some numbers. the biggest killer was insurance, as in the kind needed to protect yourself from someone who tries to sue you for personal injury.

    however, if you are willing to take the risk & the numbers look good, then go for it & all the best.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Captain_Crunch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    274
    Being in a big centre like Toronto should help you. My partners and I started a similiar facility in BC 2 years ago. We started small by training sports teams in a local gym to build our reputation and clients. We did that for 3 years before opening our own facility, but still kept our fulltime jobs and only opened when we had groups or teams much like Travis has mentioned. We just opened full time this month after 5 years of building clients and a reputation.
    One thing that really helped was getting local CHL hockey teams and tier 2 teams which brought lots of local media coverage. We also call the local media about any powerlifting comps we go to and results. They love the easy story and it gives us great exposure.
    The client base takes a long time to build for a specialized facility so don"t get caught up in big numbers of clients, it won't happen right away.

  8. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    2,474
    There are some good points made. It's better to start small and move because you've outgrown your space. Joe DeFranco started in a closet. I'm sure that's a bit of a dramatization, but the point is he started small. The compound is huge and Dave doesn't have it to make money. I can't imagine rent (even for warehouse space) is cheap in Toronto. It's not great to have a rent bill that's a few thousand a month before you even have any clients/customers. Starting small also lets you spread out your equipment purchases.

    The portion of the population that's serious about strength training is very small. If you want it to be a full-time business, then you definitely have to get beyond being just a powerlifting gym. Your best bet would be to start building a clientele of local HS and college athletes. Those are the main people that'll be serious and willing to pay (it's actually more their parents that are willing to pay).


    Checkout if there are any crossfit gyms in your area. They are a much closer comparison for you than a regular commercial gym. They are usually in warehouse space vs the strip malls that commercial gyms are in. They also have a different dues structure and a dues premium because everything is instructor led. It'll give you an idea of what people in the area are willing to pay.

    I started in my garage ~18 months ago. Last June, I move to an 840 sq ft commercial space. It's actually quite a bit of space. We have 3 power racks (one with a mono attachment), 2 competition benches, 1 flat bench to put in a power rack, GHR, reverse hyper, dumbbells, decline bench, adjustable incline bench, sled, 2 tires, boxes, bands, chains, etc. It all fits in pretty well if you're organized about it. We have 12-16 people in there at a time and it works out pretty well. The key change we made was splitting into 2 groups based on strength. That way we always have one group training bench and the other group training squat/deads. It was stupid when we'd all train squat/deads on the same day. We'd have all of us crammed into half the gym getting in each others way. Now we're more spread out and it works fine.
    www.wildirongym.com
    Become a fan of Wild Iron on Facebook:
    http://tinyurl.com/WildIron

  9. #8
    Senior Member SELK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,946
    I used to train in a gym similar to the one you are mentioning (it was a warehouse which had all sorts of powerlifting equipment, key entry etc). You would be surprised at the number of females who are interested in serious training, usually its for another sport but I would be the gym was at least 20-30 percent females. Females who are athletes seem to seek out help from trainers etc more then males. We generally think that we can just do it our self.

    If you can make the numbers work, it sounds like it would be a great gym, one that everybody on here would want to train at. Ive thought about opening a gym a few times now, and I have not found a location where the numbers work out near good enough for it to be very profitable. I know that we all love powerlifting/strongman/athletics but thats not where the money is at all. The most successful gym owner I have ever met is a bodybuilder who owns about 5 curves gyms (he can only go there after hours). I guess what I am saying is that if you think you can make it work, go for it, but if the numbers are not looking good now, they are not going to look good in 5 years.
    960/530/749 @ 242
    903/524/738 @ 220

  10. #9
    Pro Strongman | Moderator Tom Mutaffis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    76
    If your objective is to make money and have a nice training environment I would open up a gym geared toward general fitness and bodybuilding / weight loss. You can add in a "power room" with loud music and good equipment but keep it seperate from the money-making portion of the gym.

    Location is very important. You want to be easy to access but also not too close to other gyms as that will take away from your business no matter how nice your facility is or how competitive the pricing. Another important factor with location is monthly rent, a high monthly rent will place a huge burden and make turning a profit very challenging.

    If you charge $20/mo and have 100 members then you would only be bringing in $2,000 in revenue. Once you have factored in operations cost then chances are that you would be taking home very little money. If you are able to grow the business to 200 members (larger facility) and charge $25/month then you would be looking at $5,000 - which should allow for some profit but you would still be making much less than $50,000/yr combined. Money makers for smaller gyms are personal training, classes, and other services. Crossfit-type gyms typically can do well because they charge for classes and do not have extended hours.

    As Travis suggested I would recommend starting out small with a studio and then growing from there. You can personal train or set up sepcific training times for "open gym" and with 10-20 steady clients it would be a strong business, which in turn could help to fund a larger commercial facility with open memeberships. Trying to start off with $50K+ in equipment would be tough. I would just get a power rack, tires, sandbags, dumbbells, weights, and a couple of benches. You can always add more from there and picking up used equipment then re-painting or getting new pads put on them is a great way to go.

    Hope this helps.
    ASC 105 Kg Pro Strongman | My Website | Facebook Fan Page

    Weight: 235 lbs | Front Squat: 510 lbs | Overhead: 375 lbs | Deadlift: 700 lbs

    Supplements: www.AtLargeNutrition.com

  11. #10
    TJW Keith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Pickering, Ontario
    Posts
    3,238
    Thank you all very much for your responses. That was very helpful and informative. I should have made myself more clear in that my original plan was to start out very small and my goal would be to run a facility like Elite Fitness Systems', not start out that way. I don't really have any more questions at this point because, well, you guys laid everything out for me. If anything else comes to mind, I'll be sure to ask. Looks like I have a lot of numbers to crunch. At that point, I'll see if it's worth it. Thanks again, guys. Very helpful!
    Age: 24 Height: 5'9" Weight: 185

    Gym PRs: 365/240/440=1045

    People need to quit ****ing asking what they need to do, exercise wise, until they reinforce their technique - Dave Tate

    The never-ending pursuit of becoming Strong(er) - My Westside journal

  12. #11
    ANVIL POWER Detard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    5,549
    Hey guys thanks for the reply. For me and Keith this is a pretty big and exciting decision for us. We should also mention for starters the equipment we already have combined:

    2 power racks
    1 olympic platform
    4 Olympic bars
    ~1500lbs+ of olympic plates
    2 adjustable flat benches
    1 olympic commercial bench
    sleds
    tires
    farmers bars
    bands
    chains
    Dumbells (up to 35 in fixed DB, 2 sets of plate loaded handles)
    2 free standing dip stations
    foam flooring to cover about 360sq feet
    3/4" rubber mats
    chalk and stands
    some cardio equipment (treadmill, eliptical, recumbant bike)
    mirrors are sorted out
    ropes and harnesses for any pulling

    and keith might have more stuff i'm forgetting. I work for a equipment distributer and have a contact with the equipment manufacturer so all our equipment costs are local and less than if we bought online. Keith works for fitness source so I remember him mentioning something about equipment too.

    I've made lots of connections around toronto in terms of sports because i've played competitve hockey and football my whole life so I have buddies who have always looked for a good gym to train. I am working at my old highschool as an assistant football coach next season and i'm going to try to develop the strength and conditioning program at the school because I know when I was there, it was almost non existant and most of it was run by the players.

    I enjoy training and teaching athletes so I fully plan on doing private training like sport specific (football players, hockey players), but not limit myself to that. Group training sessions are also great ways to generate income so that will definitily be a big opportunity during the summer time when highschool athletes are on break. If we had 6 highschool athletes from a team come in for a 1 hour training session, the costs could be lower but still alow for 60-80 dollars an hour to be made.

    Thanks for the input and everything guys were reading it all and taking it into account.

    -Dan
    Last edited by Detard; 03-22-2010 at 06:50 PM.
    w:225lbs. h:5'10.
    630/385/545/1560
    Journal | Vids

    "im ready for the ladies too, my stomach has never been bigger and ive never been hairier." - Stumprrp

    TJW

  13. #12
    Senior Member huskybear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    406
    I think one of the problems with Toronto will be finding the numbers to make it viable right away... there's all the extreme fitnesses and good life crap that you have a couple of established brands to deal with... however I think you guys sit on a very rich gold mine in both your home areas... and I'm most familiar with Pickering... where the hell is there to train????? Extreme sucks and the few other gyms always have me wondering if they're going to be around tomorrow... I think you can draw on the basic training ideals that work that also transfer to sports... and Pickering and Durham region are a freaking hockey bonanza... so being able to start in a small facility like the small warehouses along highway 2 could be great... not to mention the football population, lacrosse, baseball etc... I think by starting somewhere drawing on the athletic crowd, you can also create a solid hardcore gym for true strength and body enthusiasts.... There are tons of jacked peeps in Whitby that don't seem to train together at the commercial gyms... just my .02 and you likely want a $1.00 refund lol... good luck guys I wish you the best of luck!!!!!!!!
    He who gains victory over other men is strong; but he who gains victory over himself is strong(er)

    "Get rid of all excess in life. The more you own, the more that owns you. Strip yourself of all things, of all the fat, and leave nothing but brain, muscles and cock. That is life." - Jim Wendler

    My Journal

  14. #13
    ANVIL POWER Detard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    5,549
    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusWild View Post
    There are some good points made. It's better to start small and move because you've outgrown your space. Joe DeFranco started in a closet. I'm sure that's a bit of a dramatization, but the point is he started small. The compound is huge and Dave doesn't have it to make money. I can't imagine rent (even for warehouse space) is cheap in Toronto. It's not great to have a rent bill that's a few thousand a month before you even have any clients/customers. Starting small also lets you spread out your equipment purchases.

    The portion of the population that's serious about strength training is very small. If you want it to be a full-time business, then you definitely have to get beyond being just a powerlifting gym. Your best bet would be to start building a clientele of local HS and college athletes. Those are the main people that'll be serious and willing to pay (it's actually more their parents that are willing to pay).


    Checkout if there are any crossfit gyms in your area. They are a much closer comparison for you than a regular commercial gym. They are usually in warehouse space vs the strip malls that commercial gyms are in. They also have a different dues structure and a dues premium because everything is instructor led. It'll give you an idea of what people in the area are willing to pay.

    I started in my garage ~18 months ago. Last June, I move to an 840 sq ft commercial space. It's actually quite a bit of space. We have 3 power racks (one with a mono attachment), 2 competition benches, 1 flat bench to put in a power rack, GHR, reverse hyper, dumbbells, decline bench, adjustable incline bench, sled, 2 tires, boxes, bands, chains, etc. It all fits in pretty well if you're organized about it. We have 12-16 people in there at a time and it works out pretty well. The key change we made was splitting into 2 groups based on strength. That way we always have one group training bench and the other group training squat/deads. It was stupid when we'd all train squat/deads on the same day. We'd have all of us crammed into half the gym getting in each others way. Now we're more spread out and it works fine.
    There are 3 crossfit gyms within 30 minutes of downtown toronto. From what I know they have been hit and miss. One in Mississauga that has been around for 3 years now I believe and has a solid membership. I will get in contact with the owners this week and see if they are willing to have a chat and maybe give us some new ideas in terms of startup and costs.

    We plan on having powerlifitng meets in the facility too as a place for the different powerlifting and weightlifting organizations around ontario.
    w:225lbs. h:5'10.
    630/385/545/1560
    Journal | Vids

    "im ready for the ladies too, my stomach has never been bigger and ive never been hairier." - Stumprrp

    TJW

  15. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NW Iowa
    Posts
    216
    Keith and Detard(Dan),sorry love to type and say Detard.
    First of all the pics above,it that where you guys train now? Your equipment,or someone elses's? Looked through the initial post but could not find a answer.
    Second,I just think as a whole there are just not enough target client to make it a go.But I could be wrong.
    As stated above,I think a smaller type gym that targets college,high school kids that have parents that are more than willing to fork out the $ to have you train the kids.
    Great thread,whatever you decide to do I wish you the best of luck.

    Ryan Hale

  16. #15
    Moderator Brian Hopper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Lakeland, Florida
    Posts
    12,686
    I would love to open up my own powerlifting gym and start a barbell club. I actually think about it all the time. The only problem is, the city I live in has at least 3 powerlifting gyms already. Not to mention 2-Gold's Gym and 3-Lifestyle Fitness. So im pretty much screwed.
    My Training Log
    My YouTube page
    Training by Tone Barbaccio
    New Dimensions Wellness & Education

    *************************
    Best geared meet @ 242
    1030SQ, 640BP, 685DL and 2355 total
    Best raw meet w/sleeves @ 242
    665SQ, 440BP, 727DL and 1815 total
    Best raw meet w/sleeves @ 275
    700SQ, 452BP, 722DL and 1874 total

    *************************
    Sponsored By:


    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements
    Vanilla Gorilla

  17. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    455
    Been working on something myself the past while. Similar to your ideas, but even after running lots of financials the income won't come close to that unless you really are a decent size. You save a ton on start up expenses compared to your average gym that is spending near $5k per piece of equipment. But you also don't attract all the people who are going to buy a membership and never come. It's possible to make money, but one of the important things in my opinion is giving people flexibility and not tying them in to a year or two contract just to come to your gym, you can always give people a good deal if they want to front the money, but that has always been one of the things that I thought made most gyms thieves.

  18. #17
    Get Some! KoSh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    585
    Posts
    1,929
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Hale View Post
    Keith and Detard(Dan),sorry love to type and say Detard.
    First of all the pics above,it that where you guys train now? Your equipment,or someone elses's? Looked through the initial post but could not find a answer.
    Second,I just think as a whole there are just not enough target client to make it a go.But I could be wrong.
    As stated above,I think a smaller type gym that targets college,high school kids that have parents that are more than willing to fork out the $ to have you train the kids.
    Great thread,whatever you decide to do I wish you the best of luck.

    Ryan Hale
    Not to speak for them, but the gym pictured is EliteFTS, the gym owned by Dave Tate.
    "Donít fall for the crap that people are peddling on message boards, in magazines or on TV. Get your **** in order, and get your training in order. Start kicking ass, and take out the crap that doesnít matter. Start doing and believing in the stuff that works, and do it today and forever. You want science and studies? **** you. Iíve got scars and blood and vomit."
    Jim Wendler, 531 Method

  19. #18
    A gallon a day, everyday! ThomasG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,715
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mutaffis View Post
    If your objective is to make money and have a nice training environment I would open up a gym geared toward general fitness and bodybuilding / weight loss. You can add in a "power room" with loud music and good equipment but keep it seperate from the money-making portion of the gym.
    .
    This.

    I used to run my business out of a hardcore elite athletic gym. Lots of powerlifters, mma fighters, bodybuilders, football players etc.. and I couldn't make good money there.

    Now I run my business out of a commercial gym and I make $$$$. I still train athletes here and there but as tom said d general fitness and bodybuilding / weight loss is where the big bucks are.
    My Journal
    Quote Originally Posted by Athos View Post
    you're an intelligent guy... but you're also half #$%&ing crazy... and that my friend is the formula for a great powerlifter.
    23 Years old
    5'10 198'er
    Squat-565(wraps) 560(Raw)
    Bench:365(raw)
    Deadlift:555(raw)
    Front Squat-465x1 (wraps) 405x2 (raw)
    AtLarge Nutrition Optimize your body and Support WBB

  20. #19
    Westside Bencher Travis Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Westside Barbell, OH
    Posts
    8,933
    I disagree here with you guys.

    I work exclusively with athletes. Own my own facility too.

    I make plenty at the moment and the gym is only growing. In fact I'm probably going to have to move to a bigger facility by the end of the summer.

    What it boiled down to for me was I knew what I wanted to do and just decided I was going to make it work. Don't do something like this half hearted. It won't work that way.

    If you know what you're doing and are good at it, the athletes will come. There is a huge market for private strength and conditioning trainers out there. The only down side is there is also a vast pool of guys who think they are good at what they do because they have taken some class or have some cert.

    Be what you expect your athletes to be. Be able to do everything you expect them to be able to do and do it well. That's what will separate you from the rest of the "trainers" out there.

    I also have the luxury of being able to train under Louie and have done so for the last 5+ years so I realize not everyone has that resource, but I would strongly encourage anyone who is considering something in this field to spend a LOT of time with someone who is a proven strength and conditioning coach. The real stuff that will make you a better trainer is learned in the gym, not in books.

    If you want to train the normal soccer mom or business guy who wants to stay in shape or just wants to lose some weight, that's fine. If you don't though, don't do it. Your heart wont be in it and it will show. I did that stuff for awhile and it bored me to freaking death. Training athletes is a whole different challenge that is awesome. You're constantly figuring out new ways to help the athlete be stronger, bigger, faster and better at their given sport.

    Just don't sell yourself short. It's not easy, but if you go into it with your eyes wide open, you will be successful.


    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

    Superior Athletics - Northeast Ohio's Center for Athlete Training
    *Westside Barbell Certified Gym

  21. #20
    Senior Member Captain_Crunch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    274
    Travis is right when talking about your heart not being in it if your training people you don't really want to. There are lots of athletes looking for direction when it comes to training and being in Canada the resources aren't there like in the states. You provide results for the athletes and things grow on their own. One thing we do to grow our client base is meet with different sports associations. We have a presentation about us, our facility and our proven track record. The association always end up doing the marketing for us with their athletes and we get groups of 12 - 24 athletes. By doing this we have hockey(our main groups), baseball, soccer, football, volleyball, speed skating, Olympic lifting, and powerlifting groups.
    Now we are branching into getting more athlete rehab. We have aligned the gym with physiotherapist and sports doctors who are refering paitients for rehab after injury or surgery. There is lots of business out there you just have to look.

  22. #21
    Dr. Subtotal
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,372
    It looks like you've chosen your niche in the market, which is to offer very good equipment for a cheap price. I'm a competitive powerlifter who needs a place to lift in the summer, so I train at a place sort of like this. The real reason I lift at this place rather then a cheaper on campus gym is solely based on the attitude this place has. I'm a fringe customer who pays the monthly fee, does not buy any supplements/shirts/things the gym offers, and does not use their trainers. I'm most likely a big liability since I pose a greater financial risk of damaging their equipment (which my summer membership would not recover). However, they allow me to do what I want, bring in my own equipment, and are generally nice to me.

    What you need to ask yourself is or realize, is that your potential clientele already lifts at some type of gym. How are you going to lure them to yours? Do some research, maybe go to a few local places these lifters may be at. Is your niche enough to do this? Maybe try harping on a strongman side to your gym. Hell even crossfitters get excited at this type of stuff. At the same time, someone who sees Atlas stones, monolifts, and non-pretty looking equipment, might not feel welcome to the gym, and this is the type of person who WILL spend the most amount of money at your gym.

    For the percentage of the gym going population (the 10% of the 15% who actually go to gyms) you're after, you're going to need a TON of volume to make up for the lack of gymgoers who buy smoothies, shirts, and training if you were to open a planet 24 hour golds gym fitness center.
    Trample the weak, hurdle the dead
    http://www.wannabebig.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=132318

    Satisfaction is the Death of Desire...

  23. #22
    A gallon a day, everyday! ThomasG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,715
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bell View Post
    I disagree here with you guys.

    I work exclusively with athletes. Own my own facility too.

    I make plenty at the moment and the gym is only growing. In fact I'm probably going to have to move to a bigger facility by the end of the summer.

    What it boiled down to for me was I knew what I wanted to do and just decided I was going to make it work. Don't do something like this half hearted. It won't work that way.

    If you know what you're doing and are good at it, the athletes will come. There is a huge market for private strength and conditioning trainers out there. The only down side is there is also a vast pool of guys who think they are good at what they do because they have taken some class or have some cert.

    Be what you expect your athletes to be. Be able to do everything you expect them to be able to do and do it well. That's what will separate you from the rest of the "trainers" out there.

    I also have the luxury of being able to train under Louie and have done so for the last 5+ years so I realize not everyone has that resource, but I would strongly encourage anyone who is considering something in this field to spend a LOT of time with someone who is a proven strength and conditioning coach. The real stuff that will make you a better trainer is learned in the gym, not in books.

    If you want to train the normal soccer mom or business guy who wants to stay in shape or just wants to lose some weight, that's fine. If you don't though, don't do it. Your heart wont be in it and it will show. I did that stuff for awhile and it bored me to freaking death. Training athletes is a whole different challenge that is awesome. You're constantly figuring out new ways to help the athlete be stronger, bigger, faster and better at their given sport.

    Just don't sell yourself short. It's not easy, but if you go into it with your eyes wide open, you will be successful.
    Many Valid points here Travis. My post is from personal experience. All the other trainers with the exception of one at the elite gym I trained at we're struggling as well. Location plays a huge roll. I agree with the hands on experience, cert's are mostly bull****. Hello crossfit? lol.

    With Detards connections it may just work. Opening a gym or studio period is risky. A hardcore/athletic gym is even riskier. I definitely make a lot more money off of general fitness, which doesn't bore me at all. Athletes are definitely funner and more of a challenge.
    My Journal
    Quote Originally Posted by Athos View Post
    you're an intelligent guy... but you're also half #$%&ing crazy... and that my friend is the formula for a great powerlifter.
    23 Years old
    5'10 198'er
    Squat-565(wraps) 560(Raw)
    Bench:365(raw)
    Deadlift:555(raw)
    Front Squat-465x1 (wraps) 405x2 (raw)
    AtLarge Nutrition Optimize your body and Support WBB

  24. #23
    Westside Bencher Travis Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Westside Barbell, OH
    Posts
    8,933
    Yeah that wasn't completely pointed at you, I was just speaking from my own experience with my gym.

    Location does play a role, but I tell you what, I have athletes drive over 40min one way just to train at my gym. That's why I say, if you're good at what you do, the athletes will come.

    Connections brings up a good point as well. When people get into this stuff, you have to make your own connections. I spend a TON of time recruiting athletes into my gym. Don't just sit and wait for them to show up. Go out and get them! Talk to them, let them know you even exist and explain to them why they should train at your gym.

    As far as the money, I actually make more doing private strength and conditioning than I did personal training. Initially it wasn't that way, but it is now. I can move 15 athletes through the gym 4 days a week and then I have a smaller group that trains 3 days a week. In the summer I move about 30 athletes through the gym 4 days a week. There is no way I could have done that personal training.

    Only reason i bring that up is just to say that if you want something bad enough, you can make it happen, regardless if it's personal training or private strength and conditioning. You just have to be innovative, agressive and patient.


    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

    Superior Athletics - Northeast Ohio's Center for Athlete Training
    *Westside Barbell Certified Gym

  25. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    2,474
    I think the key is training people in groups. Zach Even-Esh or Alywn Cosgrove had an article about it on Elite. It's the way to make the economics work. If you train 1:1, then maybe you can get $80/yr. If you train 10-15 people, you can get $10-20/person. The math is a whole lot better with the group (for you and the people you train).

    That's where I think crossfit has the business model down even if the training itself is less than ideal. Around here they charge $150-200/mo for unlimited sessions. They run 6-7 sessions a day, some of which are invite only for advanced people. Meanwhile Gold's has been running $49 to join and $10/mo for the last 2 years. The key is to own the facility and be the trainer. That way you get the $150-200/mo for each person. There's a reason crossfit gyms are popping up all over the place. They have the business model down and they are a cash cow if you run right.
    www.wildirongym.com
    Become a fan of Wild Iron on Facebook:
    http://tinyurl.com/WildIron

  26. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    455
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bell View Post
    I disagree here with you guys.

    I work exclusively with athletes. Own my own facility too.

    I make plenty at the moment and the gym is only growing. In fact I'm probably going to have to move to a bigger facility by the end of the summer.

    What it boiled down to for me was I knew what I wanted to do and just decided I was going to make it work. Don't do something like this half hearted. It won't work that way.

    If you know what you're doing and are good at it, the athletes will come. There is a huge market for private strength and conditioning trainers out there. The only down side is there is also a vast pool of guys who think they are good at what they do because they have taken some class or have some cert.

    Be what you expect your athletes to be. Be able to do everything you expect them to be able to do and do it well. That's what will separate you from the rest of the "trainers" out there.

    I also have the luxury of being able to train under Louie and have done so for the last 5+ years so I realize not everyone has that resource, but I would strongly encourage anyone who is considering something in this field to spend a LOT of time with someone who is a proven strength and conditioning coach. The real stuff that will make you a better trainer is learned in the gym, not in books.

    If you want to train the normal soccer mom or business guy who wants to stay in shape or just wants to lose some weight, that's fine. If you don't though, don't do it. Your heart wont be in it and it will show. I did that stuff for awhile and it bored me to freaking death. Training athletes is a whole different challenge that is awesome. You're constantly figuring out new ways to help the athlete be stronger, bigger, faster and better at their given sport.

    Just don't sell yourself short. It's not easy, but if you go into it with your eyes wide open, you will be successful.
    I like this post, I agree you can make it work, but like travis said you have to put everything into it to have success.

Similar Threads

  1. New Guy, Would Appreciate it if you Guys Can Bring Input
    By haitu in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-05-2007, 02:35 AM
  2. new updated yearly pics... in need your input guys
    By wannab250 in forum Members' Pics and Videos
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 11-23-2005, 10:58 AM
  3. opening a gym
    By Mission in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 03-09-2005, 02:58 PM
  4. Opening Day!
    By MrWebb78 in forum General Chat
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 04-02-2003, 11:06 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •