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Thread: military basic training

  1. #1
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    military basic training

    hey guys, im joining the army in a few weeks(or whenever i think im ready physically) and i was wondering what i could do to help me since in basic traing theres no free weight or anything i was wondering if theres any routines i can follow to help me excel in push ups sit ups and the dreaded running.

    i really didnt kno where to put this so i thought id just post it up here
    Age: 20
    Weight: 199
    Bench: 210x1
    Squat: 285x1
    Deadlift: 315x1
    Height: 6'1 GOALS
    Weight: 210
    Bench: 275
    Squat: 315
    Deadlift: 375

  2. #2
    Senior Member gmen5681's Avatar
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    dont do it. im telling you right now do not join the military. i am in the marine corps and have never been more miserable in my life. i have been in almost 3 years. did 15 months in iraq and i ****ing hate every moment of my life. there is nothing good about the military. the pay sucks, the living sucks, and the food sucks. you get treated like a dog. its the only profession in the world that you cant quit or get fired from. you will work 12+ hours a day 5 days a week. you will be run into the ground physically and mentally. if i could change anything in my life it would be to go back and not join. i would consider the air force if anything. my buddy is in the air force and he loves it. the pay is the same, the work is less. he only work 3-4 days a week. and only 6 hours a day at that. seriously dont do it. its not worth it. nothing about the army or marine corps is worth it. i did a lot of work with the army when i was in iraq. they hate their lives just as much as we do in the marines. excpet in the army you get "smoked" its basically HIIT but 4-5 times a day. the GI bill isnt worth 4 years of your life wasted, and it will be wasted. you get no trade out of the the whole thing. if for what ungodly reason you are still thinking about joining the army please look very hard into what MOS you are doing. if its infantry (what i am in the marine corps) just quit now. it sucks. its not fun, its not glamorous. its nothing that you think its going to be. you may like to shoot guns now, but trust me in 6 months to a year you will be so sick of cleaning your weapon that you will never want to shoot the thing again.

  3. #3
    big on TONING dynamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmen5681 View Post
    dont do it. im telling you right now do not join the military. i am in the marine corps and have never been more miserable in my life. i have been in almost 3 years. did 15 months in iraq and i ****ing hate every moment of my life. there is nothing good about the military. the pay sucks, the living sucks, and the food sucks. you get treated like a dog. its the only profession in the world that you cant quit or get fired from. you will work 12+ hours a day 5 days a week. you will be run into the ground physically and mentally. if i could change anything in my life it would be to go back and not join. i would consider the air force if anything. my buddy is in the air force and he loves it. the pay is the same, the work is less. he only work 3-4 days a week. and only 6 hours a day at that. seriously dont do it. its not worth it. nothing about the army or marine corps is worth it. i did a lot of work with the army when i was in iraq. they hate their lives just as much as we do in the marines. excpet in the army you get "smoked" its basically HIIT but 4-5 times a day. the GI bill isnt worth 4 years of your life wasted, and it will be wasted. you get no trade out of the the whole thing. if for what ungodly reason you are still thinking about joining the army please look very hard into what MOS you are doing. if its infantry (what i am in the marine corps) just quit now. it sucks. its not fun, its not glamorous. its nothing that you think its going to be. you may like to shoot guns now, but trust me in 6 months to a year you will be so sick of cleaning your weapon that you will never want to shoot the thing again.
    this plus I hear the GI bill's benefits have been severely cut back so things like fully funding your education and getting that $20,000 signing bonus pretty much are non-existent and supposedly, not sure if its true, but the military reserves the right to change the conditions of any incentives that it offers to any of its "employees." One of my buddies in the army was pissed because either he or one of his friends didn't get their bonus they were promised when they enlisted and on top of that the money they offered for college was restricted as well which put a huge burden on my friend as well. But if you want to get better at running, run, if you want to get better at doing push ups, do push ups etc...
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  4. #4
    Mr Sensitive
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    wow umm...


    anyway, only way to get better at the pushups/situps/running is but doing them, a lot. Practice the pushups with full ROM nose to floor, do real situps and not crunches, and get out and run. That is the only way you will get better. I don't know if it will make you feel any better, but if you are in decent shape you will be fine, because in bct that's all they do to you.


    and I have to agree with gmen5681, it isn't what you think. you can watch all the war movies all you want and you're still not even close. the first half of full metal jacket is real. it wasnt made for comedy purposes. I went in at 17 years old and I didn't reenlist because all the crap that the recruiters feed to you. I never left the states for my 4 years. I went to the range maybe 8-10 times, ftx maybe 5 times. I became good at shredding paper and using office equipment.

  5. #5
    Senior Member McLaughlin's Avatar
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    Just doing them, as stated above, is the best way.

    -Full ROM push-ups
    -Full ROM sit-ups (crunches are for pussies)
    -Just run

    The amount required isn't nearly as high as you think.

    Most guys that are in good shape physically actually come out of basic weaker than they went in.

    Also unless you're super dedicated to army, you should really look into other branches before you settle on them. I recommend the Navy or the Coast Guard.

    Anyway, best of luck to you with whatever you end up deciding.

    Trying not to die young.

  6. #6
    Senior Member ironwill727's Avatar
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    First, I would really think about joining before you do. Gmen has a lot of good points. It really is not that fun and when you think something is going to be fun it usually is not. I do not regret joining though even though it did suck a lot at times. It could make you a stronger person and less than 1% of the population has done it.
    Second, do your research and pick a MOS (job) that will help you out later in life. I was infantry and it is physically tough and you are the army's warriors but it does not carry over to a career. Check out military intelligence or something with computers or even a pilot. Personally, I wish I choose something else that would have helped out more in terms of a career. Also, check out more than just the army. The air force seems to be where people are the happiest from my experience. Also, I suggest signing the shortest contract that you can. You may want to be swayed by a big enlistment bonus for 4+ years but do not do it. Get a 2 year or less contract so you can sort of try before you buy or even think about the reserves or guard because if you like it you can transfer over to active duty. This is what I did and I am thankful for that. I was able to continue college at the sametime.


    Now, as for training.

    DO every kind of pushup that you can think of. Situps and more situps. Run everything from 2-5 miles. Squat thrusts, 8 count bodybuilders, duck walks, road marching, planks, obstalce courses. Being miserable for all of basic training. Getting woken up at 2 am and smoked for 2 hours then sleeping for 30 mins to be woken up at 4:30 for first formation and then going to do PT. Yeah, I do not miss any of that. I will tell you if you do go Army the infantry basic training is far far harder and more physical then the rest of the army. Fort Benning is no joke. Even if you go thinking you are prepared you will not be but you should go in the best shape possible. They are going to push you and they are going to try to break you so they can build you back up. Just stay focused and motivated.
    Last edited by ironwill727; 01-15-2010 at 02:52 AM.

  7. #7
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    2 minutes pushups
    2 minutes situps
    2 mile run


    thats all. Practice those three and your good. Your age will determine how many and how log.

    Now for surving basic training. Push ups LOTS AND LOTS of PUSHUPS. And about that many flutter-kicks. Master those two.

    Honestly though a few weeks isn't long enough to get ready.

    I'm thinking of going back in for the retirement.
    Last edited by EternalSearcher; 01-21-2010 at 04:22 PM.

  8. #8
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    hold up guys lol, first off thanks for the info on everything but im not going into active duty im going active reserve. thanks guys
    Age: 20
    Weight: 199
    Bench: 210x1
    Squat: 285x1
    Deadlift: 315x1
    Height: 6'1 GOALS
    Weight: 210
    Bench: 275
    Squat: 315
    Deadlift: 375

  9. #9
    Senior Member ironwill727's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James510 View Post
    hold up guys lol, first off thanks for the info on everything but im not going into active duty im going active reserve. thanks guys

    Haha like that matters now a days. You still have to do the same training just less of it. You are still required to go through basic and ait training and take a pt test 2x a year. You can still be deployed at anytime. The only difference is that you can maintain a normal life when you are not deployed. But depending on your length of contract and your luck you will be deployed at least once.

    If you are going reserve you can not do a combat MOS (job) it is all support. National Guard does have all combat positions though.

    Oh and before you sign the contract make sure you read it over. A guy in my unit wanted to have a computer job and ended up in my infantry unit. Then his first day there he was told the unit is deploying to Iraq in 6 months.
    Last edited by ironwill727; 01-26-2010 at 03:51 AM.

  10. #10
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    wow I am pretty surprised to hear all the negative!
    I was active duty enlisted Air Force for 6 years. During that time I was a flying crew chief.
    I enjoyed my time over all, of coarse there are some people that are hard to work with. I would say that goes with any job though.
    As far as crap pay and GI bens... I guess thats their opinion. I left my last duty station in Hawaii with a base pay $2200 + BAH $2000 + COLA $540 + BAS $340 a month = $5080 now I suppose that could be considers low to some but not me.
    I am currently using the Post 9/11 GI Bill and they are paying my tuition as well as $1000 yr for books and paying a BAH E5 w/dep rate and for my location is $1672/mo.
    I was also offered many chances to advance my training. I got to attend GE school in OH for 6FC engines and multiple others as well as my A&P Tickets.
    I guess a jet mechanic could get fired just as easy as any other career, but it will not off shored.

    I am sure you are going to ask why I left. Simple I have a new calling in life and that is to be a food animal veterinarian- Ag vet.

    O ya and for the original poster. Just run a few miles a day before breakfast followed by push ups and pull ups and you will be fine.
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  11. #11
    Senior Member Butcher's Avatar
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    Accepting the fact that you are a soldier, not an individual, the drill sergeants rule your life and you are not in control of any aspect of your life for the next few months from day one will do you far better than any previous training regime. If you try holding onto your individuality you are going to make an uncomftrable situation into an extremly difficult one.

    If you want some training, try doing pushups till you cant anymore, then drop to your knees and keep doing them. When you cant do anymore, hold that position. When you collapse, get back into that position. It may be a stupid way to train but is a glimpse into what the pt will be like at times.

  12. #12
    Senior Member ironwill727's Avatar
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    Andy the Air Force is not the Army. From those that I have met the AF guys were always the happiest.


    I am not trying to sound negative in my post I am just trying to get the OP to learn the reality and that the reserves are not a joke like some ppl think. A lot of ppl join and then they go wtf did I get myself in to. Talking to a recruiter does not present an accurate picture at all. I just think someone should learn as much as possible before making a life decision. There are many positives and rewards about the military but one must earn them. One of the best things about it is how close you become to your buddies and that you have each others backs no matter what. It is a team effort and no one person is above that.
    Last edited by ironwill727; 01-27-2010 at 12:53 AM.

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    I hear you Ironwill, and it is life altering for sure. I also argree with the reserves as being no joke anymore.
    Well best of luck James510 with whatever you choose.
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    and climbing...

  14. #14
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    thanks guys, in no way am i saying this is going to be easy i kno what im gettin myself into.
    Age: 20
    Weight: 199
    Bench: 210x1
    Squat: 285x1
    Deadlift: 315x1
    Height: 6'1 GOALS
    Weight: 210
    Bench: 275
    Squat: 315
    Deadlift: 375

  15. #15
    Senior Member ironwill727's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James510 View Post
    thanks guys, in no way am i saying this is going to be easy i kno what im gettin myself into.
    Believe me nobody really knows what they are getting themselves into lol. You think you have an idea then it hits you usually on day one and you ask wtf did I get myself into when you have a Drill Sgt. yelling in your face.

    Just to share with you a brief story. I did basic and ait at fort benning, ga aka hell. In the Army when you get to basic training they send you to a place called reception. You get off the bus and you expect to get yelled at but it really is not like that. I was there for 10 days (longest most boring 10 days ever). You do medical and a bunch of other bs there. Everyone says I can't wait to start training because this sucks it is so boring.

    Then that day finally comes. You wake up put your uniform on for the first time eat breakfast then wait for the buses. Some of your drill sgts. are on that bus. They yell at you a little and tell you to look down while they drive you around in circles. Then the bus stops and you hear drill sgts yelling all over the place. I'll stop there.

    Good luck. Get in great shape and choose wisely.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by James510 View Post
    thanks guys, in no way am i saying this is going to be easy i kno what im gettin myself into.
    Like others, I doubt that statement is true.
    1. You "know" what your getting into based on what others tell you, and that my friend is highly subjective.
    2. Although my time was mostly good, it still was nothing like I expected.
    3. Be prepared for the sandbox, and I dont think you can know what thats like until you have been.

    Still best of luck,
    JOURNAL
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    and climbing...

  17. #17
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    Basic Training is designed to be highly intense and challenging. The challenge comes as much from the difficulty of physical training as it does from the required quick psychological adjustment to an unfamiliar way of life.

    Basic Training is divided into two parts: Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training.

    Basic Combat Training, or BCT, consists of the first nine weeks of the total Basic Training period. It is identical for all Army, Army Reserve, and Army National Guard recruits. This is where individuals learn about the fundamentals of being a soldier, from combat techniques to the proper way to address a superior. BCT is also where individuals undergo rigorous physical training, to prepare their bodies for the eventual physical strain of combat. One of the hardest and most essential lessons learned in BCT, however, is self-discipline: BCT introduces prospective soldiers to a strict daily schedule, entailing many duties and extremely high expectations for which most civilians are not immediately ready.

    Advanced Individual Training (AIT), consists of the remainder of the total Basic Training period. It is where recruits train to eventually become experts in their chosen field, and it is therefore different for each available Army career path. For example, if an individual has an MOS (Military Occupational Specialty) of Human Intelligence Collector, they would be sent, following completion of BCT, to the Intelligence School at Fort Huachuca, Ariz. If an individual instead had the MOS of Army medic, they would be sent, after BCT, to the Army Medical Department School at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Although many AIT schools don't center around combat the way BCT does, individuals are still subject to the same duties, strict daily schedule, and disciplinary rules as in BCT. AIT trainees are also continually tested for physical fitness and weapons proficiency.

  18. #18
    small flabby and hairy joelhall's Avatar
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    things must be much different in the us than in the uk judging by some of the responses. i joined the royal marines when i was 20, and absolutely loved it. so much that im rejoining into the reserves. it really depends on what sort of person you are. some people love the pressure, the mates you make, or the lifestyle, while others have been conditioned by what they see on tv - nothing like the reality of course. here in england they did a series on the royal marine selection and training - it was pretty accurate, but they left out a lot of the 'un-pc' stuff. basically marines are well known for having a slightly 'different' sense of humour, and this is often shielded from the public, who love to kick up a fuss when theyre exposed to it.

    for all their differences though, the rm prmc does have one thing in common with most nato basic training - its there to weed out the men from the boys so to speak. they want to see who can cope with it physically and more importantly mentally. people often forget when they hear reports of 'bullying' or other such stuff in the military exactly what is expected from these men (and women in alot of cases).

    you are not being trained to be lovely polite, patriotic boys. youre not being trained to look smart on parade or standing guard outside buck house, or be welcomed home as heros for wearing a uniform. theyre not even training you 'just in case' while giving you the opportunity to see the world and get really fit and have a great respectable career.

    theyre training you to fight wars. make no mistake here either, no matter what you see on the news or in films, war is horrific. they want people who are prepared to kill other people if they have to, or are told to. they need people to take life-threatening risks. they need people who can work for long periods in hostile environments. and they need people who can and will do this, and can cope with it. they need people who can put their fear or comfort aside and continue in extremely dangerous conditions.

    so they need to make sure you not only have the right stuff but that they can nurture this as well to get the horrible business of war done. your primary role is going to be taking part in wars. if youre the sort of person who goes quiet and sulks if someone shouts at you, or will take any of the drilling personally, or even if you think youll end up attacking the instructors, then dont bother joining up in the first place. it requires a strong mind and control.

    if youre still sure you want this, and happy to go ahead with it, then heres some pointers on your training. pretty much everything you do physical training-wise has a purpose in the military (and not just as punishment):

    running: a staple in the military. you need endurance, and the bes way of getting this is running. do not put off running or training for it if it bores you (and yes its a boring thing to do). your cv endurance is going to be the best weapon you have in your fitness arsenal and help you with all of the other physical stuff. make sure you run often and hard whenever you can. dont overdo it of course, remember to get the rest where possible. but do at least one or two hard sessions a week.

    ab work: strong core is important in the military as well. almost everything you do physically will depend on core strength and stability. whether its parades for endless hours, press ups/pt or lifting heavy ordnance. work on strength and endurance here - sit ups, crunches, leg raises, planks, etc. i even hold a leg raise position doing pull ups now and then.

    press ups: again these are important as theyre a good indicator and builder of upper body endurance. the best thing i can say is to vary things up to improve them. dont just bang out press ups all the time, but switch it up and use diamond press ups, dips, weighted press ups, etc. make them harder by adding weight or raising the feet while you do them to get stronger. every week do at least one session where you go to failure, to help with endurance.

    like with most bodyweight exercises change the pace from session to session. go slow and use perfect form sometimes, and others go explosive from the bottom.

    the key to being able to do more is not to plateau because your body gets used to it. change it up!

    pull ups: get good at pull ups. this goes without saying really as theyll expect you to do them. more importantly theyll keep the shoulders strong (especially with all the press ups) and the back. theyll also show theyre worth when youre doing rope work (if you do that), swim, jumping around like a blue-a***d fly wearing battle order, etc.

    brain work: what many people forget when they train. it isnt just something for royal marines, pretty much everyone in the military needs some degree of 'strength of mind'. learning to push through the pain is one of the best ways of doing this, as its something youll have pretty much every time you train. when you max out on press ups, dont just collapse in a heap - stay in the 'up' position, take a couple of breaths and squeeze out another.

    learn to become more bloody-minded. if you set goals during the day stick to it, be determined, dont give up just because something becomes uncomfortable or irritating or difficult. im not sure how much the army differs, but im sure this will come in helpful as ive heard the us army loves to shout! be assertive in everything you do, even a little cocky if you like, and learn to be grown up (im not saying this as i think youre being childish or anything like that, but i mean remember to be a man and take things on the chin if you have to, take reponsibility for your actions, good or bad, and learn from your mistakes instead of letting them get to you or fester). get into a good routine in the day. dont sleep in if you can help it and dont just do things the easy way. do your chores round the house, ironing etc (probably better advice if youre thinking of going regular) and dont skip things just cos you 'dont feel like it'.

    and lastly learn to cope with stress. most mental injuries in the military are not down to people being weak but more because they don know how to effectively deal with stresses they face. learn decent tips that work for you to unwind or cope with problems.

    the mental thing is going to be one of the best parts of coping.

    general: dont just do straight sets. throw in interval training and circuit work. go running then drop and bang out the press ups when you stop. do long circuit sessions to keep up the endurance while you do your strength work. i always follow running or step work with pull ups press ups and sit ups. you needed go to failure on these, its just get into the routine of doing them while youre out of breath and knackered.

    oh yeah - steps. yes the girly step aerobic things. i found this helped greatly with endurance, pushing through pain, and being uncomfortable, especially doing it indoors with no wind in your face. ill grab a couple of 35lb plates and run up and down the step for half an hour. works like a charm and strengthens up the legs pretty good.

    and of course read all the above posts - some decent advice there!

  19. #19
    Senior Member gmen5681's Avatar
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    just wanted to say again don't do it. it sucks. to the guys that say you like it, you lie. and to the air force guy, no **** you like it your in the chair force...

    on a completely different note though i am glad that i joined the marine corps only because i know i would be miserable the rest of my life if i haven't joined because i would have always said "damn i should have joined the marines" but now that i got to live the ****test life you could possibly imagine, in lieu of being homeless or ill, the grass is truly greener on the civilian side and i cant want to become a born again civilian in 6 months! EAS (end of active service) baby, you cant stop time!
    once a marine always a marine, so why ****ing re-enlist?

  20. #20
    Senior Member gmen5681's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joelhall View Post
    things must be much different in the us than in the uk judging by some of the responses. i joined the royal marines when i was 20, and absolutely loved it. so much that im rejoining into the reserves. it really depends on what sort of person you are. some people love the pressure, the mates you make, or the lifestyle, while others have been conditioned by what they see on tv - nothing like the reality of course. here in england they did a series on the royal marine selection and training - it was pretty accurate, but they left out a lot of the 'un-pc' stuff. basically marines are well known for having a slightly 'different' sense of humour, and this is often shielded from the public, who love to kick up a fuss when theyre exposed to it.

    for all their differences though, the rm prmc does have one thing in common with most nato basic training - its there to weed out the men from the boys so to speak. they want to see who can cope with it physically and more importantly mentally. people often forget when they hear reports of 'bullying' or other such stuff in the military exactly what is expected from these men (and women in alot of cases).

    you are not being trained to be lovely polite, patriotic boys. youre not being trained to look smart on parade or standing guard outside buck house, or be welcomed home as heros for wearing a uniform. theyre not even training you 'just in case' while giving you the opportunity to see the world and get really fit and have a great respectable career.

    theyre training you to fight wars. make no mistake here either, no matter what you see on the news or in films, war is horrific. they want people who are prepared to kill other people if they have to, or are told to. they need people to take life-threatening risks. they need people who can work for long periods in hostile environments. and they need people who can and will do this, and can cope with it. they need people who can put their fear or comfort aside and continue in extremely dangerous conditions.

    so they need to make sure you not only have the right stuff but that they can nurture this as well to get the horrible business of war done. your primary role is going to be taking part in wars. if youre the sort of person who goes quiet and sulks if someone shouts at you, or will take any of the drilling personally, or even if you think youll end up attacking the instructors, then dont bother joining up in the first place. it requires a strong mind and control.

    if youre still sure you want this, and happy to go ahead with it, then heres some pointers on your training. pretty much everything you do physical training-wise has a purpose in the military (and not just as punishment):

    running: a staple in the military. you need endurance, and the bes way of getting this is running. do not put off running or training for it if it bores you (and yes its a boring thing to do). your cv endurance is going to be the best weapon you have in your fitness arsenal and help you with all of the other physical stuff. make sure you run often and hard whenever you can. dont overdo it of course, remember to get the rest where possible. but do at least one or two hard sessions a week.

    ab work: strong core is important in the military as well. almost everything you do physically will depend on core strength and stability. whether its parades for endless hours, press ups/pt or lifting heavy ordnance. work on strength and endurance here - sit ups, crunches, leg raises, planks, etc. i even hold a leg raise position doing pull ups now and then.

    press ups: again these are important as theyre a good indicator and builder of upper body endurance. the best thing i can say is to vary things up to improve them. dont just bang out press ups all the time, but switch it up and use diamond press ups, dips, weighted press ups, etc. make them harder by adding weight or raising the feet while you do them to get stronger. every week do at least one session where you go to failure, to help with endurance.

    like with most bodyweight exercises change the pace from session to session. go slow and use perfect form sometimes, and others go explosive from the bottom.

    the key to being able to do more is not to plateau because your body gets used to it. change it up!

    pull ups: get good at pull ups. this goes without saying really as theyll expect you to do them. more importantly theyll keep the shoulders strong (especially with all the press ups) and the back. theyll also show theyre worth when youre doing rope work (if you do that), swim, jumping around like a blue-a***d fly wearing battle order, etc.

    brain work: what many people forget when they train. it isnt just something for royal marines, pretty much everyone in the military needs some degree of 'strength of mind'. learning to push through the pain is one of the best ways of doing this, as its something youll have pretty much every time you train. when you max out on press ups, dont just collapse in a heap - stay in the 'up' position, take a couple of breaths and squeeze out another.

    learn to become more bloody-minded. if you set goals during the day stick to it, be determined, dont give up just because something becomes uncomfortable or irritating or difficult. im not sure how much the army differs, but im sure this will come in helpful as ive heard the us army loves to shout! be assertive in everything you do, even a little cocky if you like, and learn to be grown up (im not saying this as i think youre being childish or anything like that, but i mean remember to be a man and take things on the chin if you have to, take reponsibility for your actions, good or bad, and learn from your mistakes instead of letting them get to you or fester). get into a good routine in the day. dont sleep in if you can help it and dont just do things the easy way. do your chores round the house, ironing etc (probably better advice if youre thinking of going regular) and dont skip things just cos you 'dont feel like it'.

    and lastly learn to cope with stress. most mental injuries in the military are not down to people being weak but more because they don know how to effectively deal with stresses they face. learn decent tips that work for you to unwind or cope with problems.

    the mental thing is going to be one of the best parts of coping.

    general: dont just do straight sets. throw in interval training and circuit work. go running then drop and bang out the press ups when you stop. do long circuit sessions to keep up the endurance while you do your strength work. i always follow running or step work with pull ups press ups and sit ups. you needed go to failure on these, its just get into the routine of doing them while youre out of breath and knackered.

    oh yeah - steps. yes the girly step aerobic things. i found this helped greatly with endurance, pushing through pain, and being uncomfortable, especially doing it indoors with no wind in your face. ill grab a couple of 35lb plates and run up and down the step for half an hour. works like a charm and strengthens up the legs pretty good.

    and of course read all the above posts - some decent advice there!
    i have been able to work with some royal marines and they are good ****, you guys all seem pretty happy (and drunks lol, but what military person isn't) with your service and i think its a bit different with you guys since the royal marines are strictly infantry (correct me in I'm wrong) but here in the us marines we got a bunch of POGs (personnel other than grunt) aka non-infantry running the show and they gay **** up, and make our lives more miserable than it needs to.

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