The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Its no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    More Kettlebell Work

    24kg Kettlebell Snatches - Tabata Right/Tabata Left (108 reps total), 2:00 Sprint (25/25)

    Video
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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  3. #2
    A gallon a day, everyday! ThomasG's Avatar
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    Good work! I've been obsessed with kettlebells lately. I don't know how you teach kettlebell classes. Teaching in a private session is hard enough, I'm getting better at teaching it though. I'm diggin the LL in background too.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athos View Post
    you're an intelligent guy... but you're also half #$%&ing crazy... and that my friend is the formula for a great powerlifter.
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  4. #3
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Thanks Tom.

    Most of my classes are for beginners and we'll spend a good 15-20 minutes warming-up w. mobility/activation drills and stretches, then 20 minutes of technical work (which is plain old work to people who are sedentary), followed by short, focused workout(s). After working almost exclusively with athletes and young(er) people my whole life, it took me a while to realize how out of shape the average person can be - I start slowly these days.

    The mp3 has the timed chimes built in. I don't mind LL, but the rest is not fun to listen to for me.
    Last edited by Sensei; 09-06-2010 at 06:28 PM.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  5. #4
    A gallon a day, everyday! ThomasG's Avatar
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    O yes many of my clients can not swing bells right off the bat if they're life depended on it they're so immobile. I don't introduce KB's to many of them till they've been with me for several month's depending on their initial level of conditioning. I do have a 65 year old client who can snatch the 25lb KB for reps, and a 250lb woman(she started at 295) who has excellent swinging form. I use KB's a lot for my weight loss clients, everyone seems to be so curious about them at the gym and wonder wtf we are doing haha.

    Hmmm that's a good idea with the chimes in the mp3. I usually put a stopwatch on the floor and glancing at it is a pain in the ass with HIIT. I definitely need to put more time in with the bell though, thanks for the inspiration.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athos View Post
    you're an intelligent guy... but you're also half #$%&ing crazy... and that my friend is the formula for a great powerlifter.
    23 Years old
    5'10 198'er
    Squat-565(wraps) 560(Raw)
    Bench:365(raw)
    Deadlift:555(raw)
    Front Squat-465x1 (wraps) 405x2 (raw)
    AtLarge Nutrition Optimize your body and Support WBB

  6. #5
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    A reasonably sized analog clock (w. a second hand) on the wall will serve the same purpose if you don't have a gym boss or watch that does intervals - takes some time getting used to and maybe some calculation if you're using odd intervals, but it does the job.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  7. #6
    Soon to be lean... Joe Black's Avatar
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    Mam said knock you out!
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  8. #7
    Senior Member McVein's Avatar
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    Hi Sensei,

    Forgive me if this sounds like i am attempting to "call you out" or something similar, i assure you i am not. I have watched all your squat rx vids countless times and your kb stuff too.

    Im curious though, arent kb snatches meant to be done with a high elbow or a high pull, you seem to be doing swing snatches. Are these as beneficial? Im assuming these are within rkc standards as i think i remember reading you were certified!!

    I can bang out a helluva lot more of these than i can if i do a high pull, which is wrong and which is right, or alternatively, which is better?

    Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

    Chris
    Quote Originally Posted by Everyone View Post
    I agree with McVein

  9. #8
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Hi Chris,

    Not to be all zen about it, but there isn't really a wrong or right or better or worse. It depends on what you want to do and what your goals are. IMHO, most people aren't going to spend the time necessary to learn how to do kettlebell snatches (or any kind of snatch actually) proficiently - they'd be better off doing other things like, DLs (and variants), squats (and variants), cleans, etc.

    I think a lot of people don't really get what kettlebells are "for" and when or why they might choose to use one over a barbell or dumbbell, or how and why technique might differ from a barbell or dumbbell.

    You can do a kettlebell snatch in a fashion similar to a dumbbell but then, if you do, you might as well use a dumbbell. Kettlebells lend themselves to particular training methods and exercises, for example ballistic high-rep work such as kb snatches, kb clean & jerks, etc. The backswing allows for the lifter to safely dissipate kinetic energy on the eccentric and then seamlessly transition into the next rep for multiple repetitions, loading the posterior chain without cranking the shoulders and without setting the bell on the ground.

    I've heard a few people scoff at kettlebell "swing-snatches" - but, I'd invite them to try to do half the set I did in the video w. a 24kg bell, rest periods overhead, and one hand switch. I think they'd find it a real challenge for shoulder stability, grip, and hip drive (if they're doing it right).

    The kettlebell high pull is its own exercise - and for the RKC, it's generally used as a preliminary drill to the snatch.

    I hope that clears some of it up. Let me know what you think.

    Quote Originally Posted by McVein View Post
    Hi Sensei,

    Forgive me if this sounds like i am attempting to "call you out" or something similar, i assure you i am not. I have watched all your squat rx vids countless times and your kb stuff too.

    Im curious though, arent kb snatches meant to be done with a high elbow or a high pull, you seem to be doing swing snatches. Are these as beneficial? Im assuming these are within rkc standards as i think i remember reading you were certified!!

    I can bang out a helluva lot more of these than i can if i do a high pull, which is wrong and which is right, or alternatively, which is better?

    Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

    Chris
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  10. #9
    Senior Member McVein's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply!

    I use kettlebells a lot, theyre not really about in gyms yet in ireland and even if they were, it would be a rarity for anyone to be halfway competent enough to teach someone the proper form, so pretty much all my technique has come from the internet, i picked up a few tips at a crossfit cert i did too from an RKC qualified coach.

    I might take a video of myself doing some swing snatches and some hig pull snatches and post it up here for your critique if thats ok?

    Your post pretty much clears up my question though, thanks again!
    Quote Originally Posted by Everyone View Post
    I agree with McVein

  11. #10
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Sure Chris. Post it here or send me a message.

    One more thing about the high pull - the reason that we use the high pull when teaching the snatch because it sets up for a good "punch through" and discourages getting into the habit of letting the bell flop over the hand, hurting the wrist and forearm.

    In the video I posted, there's a slight pull at about chest level and then a punch through to the top.It's subtle, but it's there.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

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