The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

It’s no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Wannabebig New Member snowcrash256's Avatar
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    What is the difference between strength lifting and bodybuilding lifting plans?

    I work out every few days and I have tried a lot of different lifting routines. Right now I lift 4 sets at 8-10 reps. I am strong and ripped but not "big." I think this might be because of my type of workout. I know there is difference between strength lifting and bodybuilding lifting. Should I do a bodybuilding type of workout to gain weight? Also, what is good bodybuilding routine?

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  3. #2
    Senior Member tom183's Avatar
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    No, if you want to gain weight you have to eat more.

  4. #3
    Skinny Feet Kiff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom183 View Post
    No, if you want to gain weight you have to eat more.
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  5. #4
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
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    Depending on how advanced you are, you can regulate the volume of your routine. Less advanced, you should have low volume. More advanced, you can start increasing volume. Focus on the big compound lifts, and like tom said, eat in a surplus.
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  6. #5
    big on TONING dynamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Off Road View Post
    Depending on how advanced you are, you can regulate the volume of your routine. Less advanced, you should have low volume. More advanced, you can start increasing volume. Focus on the big compound lifts, and like tom said, eat in a surplus.
    wait a second...when i was a newb i was doing 125 reps per workout now im doing no more than 50. i disagree with your statement and replace it with eat a ****ton and go high volume if you're a newb. you can look at my w/o journal from 2007 to today. You'll see what I'm talking about.
    My journal
    Goal(Current):
    400(335) Bench Press
    600(520x3 2xBW) Dead Lift
    500(495x1) ATG Squat
    Total: 1500(1350)
    365 Front Squat
    consistency and intensity.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Allen Cress's Avatar
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    Unfourtunately there really is no black and white answer. depending on your background (ie being in athletics growing up, your structure, metabolic profile, current level of muscle mass/maturity, etc...) your program could go many different ways. Also everyone responds differently to different types of programs and their context whther they are strength, power, metabolic, or hypertrophy based or even a hybrid.

    The thing to remember is there is not one magical program that produces continuous results its the cummalitive effects of proper programing over time. For example I may have a client do back to back hypertrophy based protocols, then have them do a hybrid of strength and power and then go back to a hypertrophy based program and they will see the beneifits from the strength/power program induce more hypertrophy in the next protocol.

    A general answer to your question would be if you have been doing 4 x 8-10 reps for a while then a change or variation maybe needed. You can intergrate say 5x5 in a hypertrophy based program or more power moves like olympic lift variations such as one arm snatch. Many ways to go about it, it just depends on your current needs state.

    Also to gain you must have proper nutrition in place.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dynamo View Post
    wait a second...when i was a newb i was doing 125 reps per workout now im doing no more than 50. i disagree with your statement and replace it with eat a ****ton and go high volume if you're a newb. you can look at my w/o journal from 2007 to today. You'll see what I'm talking about.
    What I've noticed is that true beginners need relatively low volume, then as they progress through the beginner stage and begin to transition to the intermediate stage, volume has to be increased. The exception to this might be the beginner who has an extensive athletic background in another sport and thus has the GPP to handle higher volumes from the beginning. Then as intermediates start to reach advanced levels, they have to decrease volume (at least on the main lifts) since they are now using poundages that are more difficult to recover from. The difficulty is that with most beginners I've seen is that if you have them do a bunch of volume they either waste alot of time and energy on unnecessary exercises (i.e. 7 different curl variations) or they don't learn to focus their effort on a handful of main exercises because they are pacing themselves.
    As for the original question, I would recommend getting stronger on the main lifts in the 5-10 rep range and eating alot of food. You can do a set of two of isolation exercises as "finishers", but put your main effort into driving up the main lifts. Your number of isolation exercises should be limited early on. This is essentially a blend of "strength" training and "bodybuilding" training. A good strength program and a good bodybuilding program will not be nearly as different as many people think.

  9. #8
    Wannabebig New Member
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    From what I understand, the volume tends to go up as you get adapted to it and use more work to disrupt homeostasis, and frequency goes down as your recovery gets longer. Could someone tell me if they agree?

  10. #9
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dynamo View Post
    wait a second...when i was a newb i was doing 125 reps per workout now im doing no more than 50. i disagree with your statement and replace it with eat a ****ton and go high volume if you're a newb. you can look at my w/o journal from 2007 to today. You'll see what I'm talking about.
    I was going to say the same thing Sean said, but he says it much better than I could. So just read his response

    There's a reason routines like Starting Strength are so good for beginners, very low volume allows them to adapt to the stresses. As their ability to increase loads and their work capacity increases, then they can start adding in more volume. Just jumping into high volume routines usually has beginners spinning their wheels for years.
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  11. #10
    Iplan Iplan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Off Road View Post
    There's a reason routines like Starting Strength are so good for beginners, very low volume allows them to adapt to the stresses. As their ability to increase loads and their work capacity increases, then they can start adding in more volume. Just jumping into high volume routines usually has beginners spinning their wheels for years.
    ^ this! Give Starting Strength a chance.

    Too many people rule out Starting Strength as a possible workout routine (me included) as soon as they hear the phrase "beginner routine" (as everyone assumes they're not a beginner if they've lifted weights at some point in their life) ~ and that's ashame because if you do the work and EAT like Rip says, you will get STRONG, and HUGE ~ and you will see these results QUICKLY!

    I remember thinking I was an intermediater lifter ~ then I started comparing my lifts to what the guys on Starting Strength were doing after a year or so on the program, and I was quickly humbled by the weight they were moving. lol
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  12. #11
    big on TONING dynamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Off Road View Post
    I was going to say the same thing Sean said, but he says it much better than I could. So just read his response

    There's a reason routines like Starting Strength are so good for beginners, very low volume allows them to adapt to the stresses. As their ability to increase loads and their work capacity increases, then they can start adding in more volume. Just jumping into high volume routines usually has beginners spinning their wheels for years.
    touche touche I started with the wbb routine 1 (or whatever its called) then I jumped to the higher volume so I suppose it was low volume, to high to low. But one thing I cant get over I never ended up looking like the guy in the picture lol
    My journal
    Goal(Current):
    400(335) Bench Press
    600(520x3 2xBW) Dead Lift
    500(495x1) ATG Squat
    Total: 1500(1350)
    365 Front Squat
    consistency and intensity.

  13. #12
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dynamo View Post
    But one thing I cant get over I never ended up looking like the guy in the picture lol
    Ya, me neither...but maybe when I turn 50
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  14. #13
    Senior Member Raleighwood's Avatar
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    SS is actually pretty high in squat volume. You have to keep in mind, with SS the goal is to add weight to the bar 2-3x a week for 3x5 sets across. In a few months your volume/intensity begins to sky rocket.
    My 10 week cut results

    "Sweat in training so you don't bleed in battle."

  15. #14
    Wannabebig New Member
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    There are a lot of internet guru types who think that SS is a poor choice for novices who are interested primarily in bodybuilding, as the volume is low. Personally, I think that's bull****. I and several other people I know why jumped on SS saw extremely good results. It may not be a perfect program, but it damned well holds its own.

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