The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    15

    The Pump's Effect on Seperate Muscles

    Hey guys,

    I was just realizing the other day that when I get done with a really killer back/shoulders workout and my lats are really swollen my legs look skinnier and less defined. Also when I do legs and my quads hams and calfs are pumped my upper body seems to deflate. I was thinking it might be because if a lot of blood is rushing into the muscles your working it must come out of the muscles you are not working. Is this true and am I actually seeing what i think im seeing or is it just my paranoia kicking in again.

    P.S. The next day when my swell has totally dissipated things seem normal again.
    Stats

    Starting weight - 170-175
    Starting height - 6 foot 2.5

    Current weight - 200 - 205
    Current height - 6 foot 3

    Months lifting - 13

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  3. #2
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    7
    The 'pump' refers to when the blood rushes into the capillaries surrounding muscle cells, and fluid and nutrients (oxygen, etc.) diffuse from the capillaries into the muscle cell. On the other end, fluid (minus nutrients) exits the muscle cell by diffusing back into capillaries (osmosis). When the hydrostatic pressure pushing fluid into the cell is greater than the osmotic pressure pushing fluid out of the cell, fluid builds up and a pump occurs.

    So the specific muscle group you are targeting on the day at the gym will go through this process, and your muscles will retain this pump I suppose until the osmotic gradient balances and you 'go back to normal'. If you are doing a upper/lower split I suppose that whatever you were doing that day would look larger than the other by comparison only.. the other muscles don't become actually smaller.
    Last edited by vandelay; 10-21-2010 at 07:49 PM.

  4. #3
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    15
    oh ok thanks, i was just thinking that the fluids had to be coming from some other part of the body so if there was more fluid in the muscle cells of your arms then there would be less distributed everywhere else.
    Stats

    Starting weight - 170-175
    Starting height - 6 foot 2.5

    Current weight - 200 - 205
    Current height - 6 foot 3

    Months lifting - 13

  5. #4
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    7
    The movement of fluid out of or into capillaries is controlled by pressures within the blood itself and in the surrounding interstitial (connective tissue) compartment.
    As you exercise, the blood vessels in your muscles dilate and the blood flow is greater, this causes the capillaries within the muscle to dilate. The increased blood flow delivers more oxygenated blood to the working muscle.
    SO if, for example, feeding arterioles dilate the hydrostatic pressure of the capillary blood increases and surpasses the plasma solute osmotic pressure as well as both surrounding interstitial pressures, the movement of fluid will be OUT of the capillary and INTO the interstitial tissue.

    Basically I think that as you workout certain muscle groups, a higher demand for blood flow to those specific areas is necessary. As the blood rushes around quicker, an increased hydrostatic pressure placed on the capillaries releases nutrient rich fluids into the muscle cells. The mechanism pushing fluid in is much more effective than the mechanism pushing fluid out. Pumps only last about an hour or two, and as fluid concentrations in the cell return to normal, cell volume too retreats back to normal.
    The 'fluid' isn't transported from another part of the body to create an excess or pump, it relies on the increased pressure of the travelling blood to release it from the capillaries.

    Haha sorry I know it's a lot but I was just reading up some more and I found some interesting stuff I thought I'd share :P
    Last edited by vandelay; 10-22-2010 at 09:29 PM.

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