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Thread: Pain in neck and back starting to piss me off. Can i use a COLD pack on neck?

  1. #1
    white trash goes north WilliamX's Avatar
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    Pain in neck and back starting to piss me off. Can i use a COLD pack on neck?

    can i use a cold pack on neck and my upper back? I tried to before, i think works bettter then HOT one, but should i do it?
    ogrish.com

  2. #2
    Pain in the Ass Allie's Avatar
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    Of course you can, the cold will reduce any swelling or inflimation. Only use it for 15- 20 mins, but it should help, if things have really been bothering you, you could always take some motrin (or other anti-inflamatory) to help.

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    Wannabebig Member
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    what is wrong with it?

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    Originally posted by Allie
    if things have really been bothering you, you could always take some motrin (or other anti-inflamatory) to help.
    No offense Allie, I think this is a terrible idea. Taking meds to dull the pain without knowing WHY you're in pain?

    WilliamX - See a chiropractor man. Find out why your neck/back is FUBARed. IMHO it's better to see a chiro than a GP/MD for back neck stuff because they focus on it more and can easily identify most problems. Plus if ya have a sore neck, most GPs will jsut tell you to take an aspirin anyway.

    Cal

  5. #5
    is no more. Orange357's Avatar
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    Callahan its a perfectly legit and intelligent thing to do. In many cases the injury can be worsened by inflammination. It may or may not be anything serious. and still most docs would tell you to do that anyway.
    ...watch me reap of what I sow....

    and BOOM goes the dynomite!

  6. #6
    . Delphi's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Callahan
    ...Taking meds to dull the pain without knowing WHY you're in pain?

    ... See a chiropractor man. Find out why your neck/back is FUBARed. IMHO it's better to see a chiro than a GP/MD for back neck stuff because they focus on it more and can easily identify most problems. Plus if ya have a sore neck, most GPs will jsut tell you to take an aspirin anyway...
    For most minor musculoskeletal pains, REST/Ice/Elevation is a reasonable first strategy. If that doesn't take care of the pain, or if the pain recurs, or if the pain is severe then a visit with a physician (MD/DO/DC) is in order.

    I personally wouldn't go to a doc at the first onset of minor pain, and I wouldn't recommend having a spinal manipulation at first onset either.

    I'm not anti-Chiropractic. My ex-sister-in-law is one, and I've had my back manipulated by a DO and a chiropractor before. One thing I'd like to point out is that manipulation of the neck is not an absolutely benign procedure. The is a definite, albeit low, incidence of damage to the vertebral arteries, carotid arteries, jugular veins, and spinal cord from manipulation. If you go to a chiropractor with neck pain you can bet money you'll get a neck manipulation. It sure would suck to end up with an injury to a blood vessel or the spinal cord for a problem that could have been treated adequately with REST/Ice/Elevation.

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by Delphi

    For most minor musculoskeletal pains, REST/Ice/Elevation is a reasonable first strategy. If that doesn't take care of the pain, or if the pain recurs, or if the pain is severe then a visit with a physician (MD/DO/DC) is in order.
    I agree to a large degree. However, the phrase 'beginning to piss me off' suggested to me that it was a longer-term thing. Pressure/Ice/Elevation/Rest has been a part of sports medicine for ages, and it's pretty correct. I'm not disputing that. Taking medication, even over-the-counter stuff, to counteract nagging or longer-term neck/back pain? Not so smart IMHO.

    I'm not anti-Chiropractic. My ex-sister-in-law is one, and I've had my back manipulated by a DO and a chiropractor before. One thing I'd like to point out is that manipulation of the neck is not an absolutely benign procedure. The is a definite, albeit low, incidence of damage to the vertebral arteries, carotid arteries, jugular veins, and spinal cord from manipulation. If you go to a chiropractor with neck pain you can bet money you'll get a neck manipulation. It sure would suck to end up with an injury to a blood vessel or the spinal cord for a problem that could have been treated adequately with REST/Ice/Elevation.
    I will assume that you're only responding to what you've seen in the news, so let me make a couple of key points in response to your mentioning of the potential for arterial dissection. If you are responding based on a medical/health background, shame on you -- there are plenty of journal articles that tell the real story:

    1) Although there is a lot of press about links between chiropractic manipulation of the neck to dissection or occlusion of the vertebral artery, there is no direct evidence that such is the case. There's an instance going through the courts here in Canada right now where someone died (within a couple of days) of receiving a neck manipulation and the medical community is using it as an excuse to try and generate an antoichiropractic witch hunt. It's worth noting that

    2) One of the key articles that gets quoted a lot is "Spinal manipulation: Its safety is uncertain", a COMMENTARY article published in the CMA Journal in January of this year. Written by Edzard Ernst, this isn't actually a study, but simply an OPINION piece that REFERS to a study in the "Stroke" journal, May 2001.

    Chiropractic manipulation and stroke: a population-based case-control study
    Rothwell DM, Bondy SJ, Williams JI.
    Stroke. 2001 Oct;32(10):2441.
    Abstract:
    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Several reports have linked chiropractic manipulation of the neck to dissection or occlusion of the vertebral artery. However, previous studies linking such strokes to neck manipulation consist primarily of uncontrolled case series. We designed a population-based nested case-control study to test the association.
    METHODS: Hospitalization records were used to identify vertebrobasilar accidents (VBAs) in Ontario, Canada, during 1993-1998. Each of 582 cases was age and sex matched to 4 controls from the Ontario population with no history of stroke at the event date. Public health insurance billing records were used to document use of chiropractic services before the event date.
    RESULTS: Results for those aged <45 years showed VBA cases to be 5 times more likely than controls to have visited a chiropractor within 1 week of the VBA (95% CI from bootstrapping, 1.32 to 43.87). Additionally, in the younger age group, cases were 5 times as likely to have had >/=3 visits with a cervical diagnosis in the month before the case's VBA date (95% CI from bootstrapping, 1.34 to 18.57). No significant associations were found for those aged >/=45 years.
    CONCLUSIONS: While our analysis is consistent with a positive association in young adults, potential sources of bias are also discussed. The rarity of VBAs makes this association difficult to study despite high volumes of chiropractic treatment. Because of the popularity of spinal manipulation, high-quality research on both its risks and benefits is recommended.


    So, we find a study which demonstrates that there is a CORRELATION between people visiting chiropractors within a week of having a stroke. Additionally the range of probability cited indicates this places the risk of stroke for individuals aged under 45 years at about 1.3 per 100 000 chiropractic visits, with a wide 95% confidence interval of 0.516.7 per 100 000. Given the anti-chiropractic bias exhibited in other articles by the author of the January article (Ernst), I'm not surprised that he chose the most dramatic end of this range of probability to report, but he doesnt even get THAT right.

    3) Susan J. Bondy (one of the AUTHORS of the study quoted by Ernst) actually replied to another commentary article in October's CMAJ (Arterial dissections following cervical manipulation: the chiropractic experience by Scott Haldeman, Paul Carey, Murray Townsend, Costa Papadopoulos) that cited her article in 'Stroke' and suggested that Haldeman, et al.'s suggestion of a very low incidence of correlation between stroke and chiropractic was too low in light of their study. The interesting thing about Bondy's response is her comment that (emphasis mine)

    "The evidence to date indicates that the risk associated with chiropractic manipulation of the neck is both small and inaccurately estimated. The estimated level of risk is smaller than that associated with many commonly used diagnostic tests or prescription drugs. . ..

    This leads into one of most important things in this whole issue, IMHO. Many MDs are quick to jump on the anti-chiro bandwagon, citing the chance that something bad might happen. Yet these same MDs will cheerfully prescribe diag tests and/or drugs to patients which have a higher incidence of dangerous outcomes.

    One might almost suspect that there is an element in the medical lobby that recgonizes the erosion of both authority and revenue stream chiropractic acceptance means to the medical community and is working to stop it. I mean, where a surgeon can use all kinds of resources (surgery, rehab, drugs, etc.) to help someone deal with back pain, a chiropractor need only perform some adjustments and often achieves the same or better results.

    Anyway, I've rambled on quite a bit here, but the take home point?

    It's silly to overstate the POTENTIAL risk associated chiropractic neck manipulations. You have a better chance of being struck by lightning than you do of dying from stroke via a neck manipulation.

    Callahan
    Last edited by Relentless; 05-22-2002 at 08:40 AM.

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