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Thread: Sled dragging observation

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  1. #1
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
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    Sled dragging observation

    I've been using sled dragging after my squat sessions to work on conditioning and added leg work. I usually use a 200+ lb seld and really lean into it to get as much heavy work as possible. After yesterday's squat session I was feeling a little whooped, so I decided to lighten the sled a little for my pulls. I dropped the sled weight to 130 lbs and focussed on taking larger steps. I'll tell you what, this hit my hamstrings like never before. I will be experimenting with it some more but I was wondering if anybody else has had this experience?
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    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    I haven't used a sled much, but I've used my pulling harness a lot, mostly on hills. I think you're right - it makes a difference to take longer strides.
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  3. #3
    Hungry like the wolf. Dgro's Avatar
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    It makes sense. By loading up the sled with 200+lbs and leaning way forward, you're mimicking a sprinter's drive phase (when they come out of the blocks and accelerate, before they're standing upright). the drive phase is very quad-dominant compared to the upright sprinting phase, which is entirely posterior chain dominant, which is what you are probably doing with a lighter weight even if you don't realize it

    sprinters use weight sleds to build leg strength and explosiveness in the horizontal plane of motion (something you can't really do in the weight room - squats, deads, and power cleans are all vertical), but even for the biggest and strongest guys there's really no need to use a huge amount of weight like 200lbs. if you ever feel like switching things up even more, you could try using only 50-75lbs and focus on running upright while moving as quickly as possible. go for a distance of 30-50 meters with short rests inbetween - makes for some damn good conditioning.
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  4. #4
    Westside Bencher Travis Bell's Avatar
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    Try walking leading with your heels and taking large steps. It'll get even better


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  5. #5
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sensei View Post
    I haven't used a sled much, but I've used my pulling harness a lot, mostly on hills. I think you're right - it makes a difference to take longer strides.
    I'm thinking so, I'll keep experimenting with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dgro View Post
    It makes sense. By loading up the sled with 200+lbs and leaning way forward, you're mimicking a sprinter's drive phase (when they come out of the blocks and accelerate, before they're standing upright). the drive phase is very quad-dominant compared to the upright sprinting phase, which is entirely posterior chain dominant, which is what you are probably doing with a lighter weight even if you don't realize it

    sprinters use weight sleds to build leg strength and explosiveness in the horizontal plane of motion (something you can't really do in the weight room - squats, deads, and power cleans are all vertical), but even for the biggest and strongest guys there's really no need to use a huge amount of weight like 200lbs. if you ever feel like switching things up even more, you could try using only 50-75lbs and focus on running upright while moving as quickly as possible. go for a distance of 30-50 meters with short rests inbetween - makes for some damn good conditioning.
    Interesting. That makes a lot of sense. I'm not a runner, but I'm always looking for ways to work the legs and increase my conditioning. But I prefer walking with the sled because running with it takes away the friction.

    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bell View Post
    Try walking leading with your heels and taking large steps. It'll get even better
    Are you talking about pulling the sled backwards? That is twice as hard and kills the quads.
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  6. #6
    Westside Bencher Travis Bell's Avatar
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    No going forwards almost like you are walking on your heels trying to stretch out your calves.

    It kinda pre extends the hamstring (think i just made that term up) and youll really feel it in the hips and hamstrings


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  7. #7
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bell View Post
    No going forwards almost like you are walking on your heels trying to stretch out your calves.

    It kinda pre extends the hamstring (think i just made that term up) and youll really feel it in the hips and hamstrings
    Okay...I will definitely try that. Thanks.
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  8. #8
    Become Unbreakable Mark!'s Avatar
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    Had my first real sled experience, did what Travis was saying. Long leg drive, leading with the heals, and that sucks. Still really sore today. Was definitely a good workout.
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