Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: which squat places the least stress on the lumbar?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    152

    which squat places the least stress on the lumbar?

    I very recently hurt my back. I think it was doing 25 reps in the squat, getting a little off balance, but I think it has been sneaking up on me. Not a heavy weight, but I was tired. My lower left back seems to get out of wack at times, it is what I have my chiropractor work on most of the time. I went to the doc, he gave me some muscle relaxant, and recommended going to a physical therapist if it bothered after a week. I saw my chiropractor, felt great, but then a day later when I was lifting a light piece of cedar with a customer, the back pain came right back, terrible. So I made an appt with a physical therapist, who gave me some exercises to do to stretch the back, and then we will do some traction. He thinks I have a disc problem. MRI's are expensive, so I will do this only if it is necessary.

    Well, I like working out, and I plan to do so once again, but I am behaving myself for the time being, NoT doing anything other than some light kettlebell work, some ab work that does NoT bother the back, and stretches. I rest more.

    Anyway, some time ago I inquired about those hip belt squats. It seems like it takes some doing to get an effective place to do them, so I just did not go buy any. Will these have less mpact on the back, or is the trap bar the best way to go? Right now I am not doing any of that, until I see this get sorted out.

    It seems to me that being in the upside of my 50s, that while if I can return to hard exercise for my back, that I need to be sure of what will not hurt the back any more.

    Well, thanks for any input.

  2. #2
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,884
    Hip belt squats will not work the back as the weight is attached at the hips.
    Trap Bar Deadlifts are a tough call because some guys use more back than others.
    Of course, I believe in working an injured back after it has healed to make it stronger.
    _________
    ______
    ___

    Off Road Journal

    http://www.wannabebig.com/logo/alnlogo_white.gif

    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

  3. #3
    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    12,662
    Squat with an upright upper body. When you find yourself leaning forward you are using too much weight. Problem solved. That, or just get a strong back.


    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

  4. #4
    Cardio bunny Alex.V's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Duke
    Posts
    41
    Honestly, until you know whether it's a disc problem or a muscular problem, ANY exercise prescription is potentially risky.

    If it's muscular, you're better off (as people indicated) strengthening your back as your rehabilitation allows.

    If it's a disc issue (herniated disc), then quite frankly any load bearing exercise, regardless of angle, will make matters worse. (Whether your back is upright or leaning forward, provided you're maintaining a proper lumbar curve the pressure on the discs is the same).

    I know MRIs are expensive, believe me, but if it's a disc issue and you continue lifting, the long term effects could be crippling.
    "Except Belial. He knows everything. This isn't a sarcastic attack, either. He really knows everything." -----Organichu
    "Alex is all knowing and perfect"-----Jane (loosely paraphrased)
    -515/745/700 bench/deadlift/squat
    Current mile time: 4:23
    Marathons: 3
    Century races: 3
    Ironmans: 1
    Ultramarathons: 1
    Current supps: http://www.atlargenutrition.com/prod...covery/results

  5. #5
    Senior Member Invain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,967
    Do you feel anything in your legs when the back pain flares up? I had a pinched sciatic a couple years ago and I swore my back was fucked. Had an MRI done and all that jazz, doc figured it was just muscular. The pain finally went away when I started stretching regularly, including glute/posterior chain exercises such as glute bridges.
    Best lifts: 615/475/660, Raw w/ Wraps
    http://www.youtube.com/user/invain622002

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    152
    Thanks for the answers gentlemen. I am not doing any heavy lifting while this business is going on. Most anything I would do caused pain, although stretching would help it. I am still on the muscle relaxant. It seems to be iimproving each day, slowly. The exercises I did this morning helped.

    So thanks for the word about the MRI. I am going to proceed with the plan the physical therapist laid out, which is basically to do stretching to help the spasmed and tight muscles, and then see where things are at. The traction should help. I reckon if it is necessary I will have to have an MRI.

    No, I don't much seem to have shooting pains down my leg, they are all around either my hip or my lower back, right across the small of the back, both lumbar and the sacroiliac. If I squat(freehand) it isn't too bad now, before I would have to help myself up with my hands.

    Yes, keeping upright back in squatting is a good idea. I do have a Gerard trap bar, and the way I use it I don't bend much, I use more legs. I'm not using that now, I want to see some healing.

    Then yes, I agree, it is best to strengthen the airea. I usually find that rehab means light exercise in several ways. I am thinking it is a good idea to get one of these thera balls and to sit on that and roll it around, that kind of action helps to strengthen as well as make you more flexible. Then I want to get the back strong. I'm for that, I like cleaning and pressing or rows or deadlifts, I much admire a strong back. I just can't do those things now.

  7. #7
    Cardio bunny Alex.V's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Duke
    Posts
    41
    Sounds reasonable.

    Do bear in mind, as I said, any exercise where the back is being compressed will stress the discs equally (upright back squats, leaning forward, trap bar, etc.), so back angle only makes a difference if it's muscular.

    I'm not sure the thera ball will do much of anything, but the stretching and relaxing all sound good.

    Good luck to you, mate. Keep us posted.
    "Except Belial. He knows everything. This isn't a sarcastic attack, either. He really knows everything." -----Organichu
    "Alex is all knowing and perfect"-----Jane (loosely paraphrased)
    -515/745/700 bench/deadlift/squat
    Current mile time: 4:23
    Marathons: 3
    Century races: 3
    Ironmans: 1
    Ultramarathons: 1
    Current supps: http://www.atlargenutrition.com/prod...covery/results

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    152
    Quote Originally Posted by Belial View Post
    Sounds reasonable.

    Do bear in mind, as I said, any exercise where the back is being compressed will stress the discs equally (upright back squats, leaning forward, trap bar, etc.), so back angle only makes a difference if it's muscular.

    I'm not sure the thera ball will do much of anything, but the stretching and relaxing all sound good.

    Good luck to you, mate. Keep us posted.

    Thanks for the sensible advice.

    Bending forward brought numbing killing pain, even getting up from a squat did. Now I can squat freehand, and, sloowly touch my fingers, even palms to the floor, where I couldn't do that at all at first.

    I have thought a thera ball would make for better flexibility in the hips and deal with stiffness, slowly.

    Thanks to each one who answered my query.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    152
    Thanks for the caution. This evening I went to see a physical therapist, the second I have consulted. Very helpful. Both of the PTs I have seen think I am vulnerable right now to hurting the spine, no heavy weights now. However, it seems that I have good prospects, the young woman thought I had good strength and flexibilty of joints. My lumbar muscles, back muscles and tissues(fascia), and the thigh muscles, both quadriceps and hamstrings are way too tight, and therefore it affects ones posture and makes it hard on my vertebrae. Hoiw does it make it hard on the vertebrae? She thinks the abdominal exercises I have done strengthen the iliopsoas and not the lower abdomen, and that this muscle is pulling hard on the spine, turning it. She applied pressure to my sacroiliac, which was turned out, I could feel that it was out of alignment, which I had commented to her. This made some difference right quickly. The iliopsoas was strong, but she showed me how that my lower/middle abdomen strength and control were not good, and that my leg muscles, quads and hamstrings are also way too tight, therefore I compensate by a back posture that places strain on the back.

    So, this helpful and knowledgeable woman I saw this afternoon recommends a number of exercises, and to hold off on squats or deadlifts(especially). Thankfully, I have met two PTs that are not opposed to weight training at all. She noted several things about my posture, which I did not believe at first, but after thinking about it, I believe she has quite a few things right. She showed me several things I was doing in stretching that are not helping me as I need to be helped, I mean how I do the stretches.
    Last edited by NordicMan; 05-14-2011 at 05:03 AM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    152

    amazing how simple exercises can help

    I went to another physical therapy appt. and after some poking and testing, got some exercise which tired my back, but did a good deal of good. One thing that was done was a 'clock' exercise, in which lying supine you press your back to the mat/table, around lumbar 5, they call it, for several seconds, then you press your left hip and lightly raise your right hip. Then you apply attention and press your sacrum down, and then the right hip, while sliightly lifting the left. So around you go clockwise and then counterclockwise. Actually the first way would be counterclockwise, depending on how you look at it. Elvis probably would have been good at this exercise.

    Welll, anyway, this exercise, which exercises the multifidus, along with one to stretch the ilio psoas muscles, has helped, as well as the other exercises that I have been doing.

    I felt good enough to take some light weight, kettlebells and then plates, and do some light squatting. It was nice to do that without having a pain like an electrical shock. I felt that I may be able to rejoin the human race again some day, and exercise strongly once again, hopefully the wiser for it all.

Similar Threads

  1. Deadlift lumbar pain / Where did my squats go?!
    By Partyfoul in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-17-2009, 08:57 PM
  2. lumbar / deadlift
    By Corey170 in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-24-2008, 12:51 PM
  3. places to go in sydney?
    By Praetorian in forum General Chat
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-19-2004, 04:36 AM
  4. Lumbar injury?
    By Victor in forum General Chat
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-22-2003, 06:17 AM
  5. Lumbar muscles cramp while running
    By Cue-Ball in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-16-2003, 02:03 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •