The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
Latest Article

The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

It’s no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
More Recent Articles
Contrast Training for Size
By: Lee Boyce
An Interview with Marianne Kane of Girls Gone Strong
By: Jordan Syatt
What Supplements Should I be Taking? By: Jay Wainwright
Bench Like a Girl By: Julia Ladewski
Some Thoughts on Building a Big Pull By: Christopher Mason

Facebook Join Facebook Group       Twitter Follow on Twitter       rss Subscribe via RSS
Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    south jersey
    Posts
    37

    Questions about biofeedback

    It seems difficult to differentiate between laziness and just needing a break. I know it's highly individualized but I was curious to hear what some of the markers people look for when their body is trying to tell them to take a few days off i.e. mood change, loss of energy. Also, when you do take some time off, is it for a predetermined amount of days or just when you feel it's time to get back in there?

  2.    Support Wannabebig and use AtLarge Nutrition Supplements!


  3. #2
    Westside Bencher Travis Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Westside Barbell, OH
    Posts
    8,933
    What is time off?


    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

    Superior Athletics - Northeast Ohio's Center for Athlete Training
    *Westside Barbell Certified Gym

  4. #3
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    160
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bell View Post
    What is time off?
    taking "time off" is a good way to set yourself up for regression and laziness; maybe getting out of the habit of working out for a long time....
    Now, a structured deload, recycle or dynamic effort phase.... that's different...

  5. #4
    Westside Bencher Travis Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Westside Barbell, OH
    Posts
    8,933
    Quote Originally Posted by NITF View Post
    taking "time off" is a good way to set yourself up for regression and laziness; maybe getting out of the habit of working out for a long time....
    Now, a structured deload, recycle or dynamic effort phase.... that's different...
    Even a structured deload is a waste of time for bodybuilding.

    to the OP my mildly put point was don't take time off. Being motivated is a decision, not a product of your training. The results of your training will be strongly correlated to your motivation (which goes back to being a choice)


    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

    Superior Athletics - Northeast Ohio's Center for Athlete Training
    *Westside Barbell Certified Gym

  6. #5
    Squat Heavy, Squat Often Cards's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    2,944
    Travis knows his stuff, I would listen to him.
    H: 5'7" W:185
    Goals: 495 -315 -585

    “Persistence Persistence.” - Calvin Coolidge.
    "I'm so pissed at how dumb this thread is that I think I'll go kick my cat. Again"-Belial
    "I mean, it's kind of like neutering your cat, hoping that'll stop your dog from humping your leg." - Belial
    Journal

  7. #6
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    south jersey
    Posts
    37
    I remember there was a post on here a while back about a member who didn't take one day off his program for the entire year. The responses were obviously positive but there was also a lot of responses that conveyed they wished they could've done the same thing but "life happens"... sickness, tragedies, injuries or whatever.

    Travis and NITF, I think I understand what you're both saying. Unless it's impossible to get to the gym when your program calls for it you go. I agree with that. Consistency and discipline are paramount. However, I don't think you guys were saying that you don't listen to changes in your body or mentality.

    And to Travis' point about motivation being a choice and not a product of training; I think lack of motivation is actually fear and self doubt; not fully committing to a set regiment. How many times have people come on here and asked for a program and once it's given to them they come back with doubts it'll work for them b/c there's not enough volume or whatever.

    I'm not sure if I'd say motivation is a decision but dicipline certainly is. Motivation, I think, is a non-factor, but it will come after a GOOD program is fully committed to.
    Last edited by riptied1; 09-09-2011 at 01:24 PM.

  8. #7
    Rory Parker Behemoth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    5,324
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bell View Post
    Even a structured deload is a waste of time for bodybuilding.

    to the OP my mildly put point was don't take time off. Being motivated is a decision, not a product of your training. The results of your training will be strongly correlated to your motivation (which goes back to being a choice)
    I tend to agree with this, especially if one is newer to lifting. It takes a lot of pushing to realize what you're truly capable of. The first time you think you're up against a wall you're probably not even remotely close.
    accuflex - LOLZZZZ!!!11one1!! SOEM PPL WORK THRE ARMZ!!!!11!! LETS KILL THEM111

    "You can fake effort with grunts and clanging weights but quiet, consistent hard work coupled with gradual strength increases earns universal respect in gyms" - Steve Colescott



    I'd rather Situation be a member of this board. -Joey54

  9. #8
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,905
    Quote Originally Posted by Behemoth View Post
    The first time you think you're up against a wall you're probably not even remotely close.
    Good point. It takes a while to really learn how to push yourself.
    _________
    ______
    ___

    Off Road Journal

    http://www.wannabebig.com/logo/alnlogo_white.gif

    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements – Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

  10. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    216
    I always took a week long break after 8-12 weeks. It is hard both physically and mentally to just keep going without any breaks. I'd also suspect that many people that don't take breaks probably have some "junk" workouts, which are like breaks.

    I did the same thing when I used to run long distance. After cranking out the miles for 3-6 straight months, you just really need a break.

    Looking forward to my break always kept me motivated. Some days I really wouldn't want to complete my workout, but I always would think "well, in just X weeks you will be able to enjoy a full week of rest, so just gut it out until then". It sort of marks beginning and ending (and new beginning) points to a cycle, instead of just going on and on (and on and on........).

    I'd also "suggest" that taking breaks will help reduce injuries and help you to stay healthy, but I have no evidence to back up this claim. Just a gut feeling.
    Last edited by r2473; 09-09-2011 at 01:56 PM.

  11. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    655
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bell View Post
    Even a structured deload is a waste of time for bodybuilding.
    Why's that? I always heard the opposite

  12. #11
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    160
    Quote Originally Posted by greemah View Post
    Why's that? I always heard the opposite
    Same here, and if that's the case then why are deloads in major bodybuilding programs?

  13. #12
    Westside Bencher Travis Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Westside Barbell, OH
    Posts
    8,933
    deloads are for central nervous system refreshment. Unless you're doing a powerlifting routine you shouldn't even be lifting heavy enough to suppress your central nervous system. I train at Westside with some of the strongest guys in the world and we train heavy year round. The only time we deload is the week before a meet, so about twice a year.

    You don't see the Pros deloading before a big show.


    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

    Superior Athletics - Northeast Ohio's Center for Athlete Training
    *Westside Barbell Certified Gym

  14. #13
    Senior Member Allen Cress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,159
    Taking a week or so off is only really needed for advanced trainees who train intensley each and every workout, which a lot do not even when they think they do.

    I usually take 1 week off every 12-16 weeks, but it is needed. On the other side individuals can get burnt out and a few days off would do them good to mentally recharge. Its not a s black and white as saying you should or shouldn't.

  15. #14
    Wannabebig Member alexspt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    28
    I always go by my inability to sleep and flat muscles- both of which are signs of over training. I think it's funny some people don't take "off days". Just goes to show how "intense" their training sessions are.
    Favorite Quote:"Those who think they have not time for bodily exercise will sooner or later have to find time for illness--Edward Stanley"

    Bodybuilding Information, Interviews, and more: www.directlyfitness.com

  16. #15
    Moderator Off Road's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,905
    Quote Originally Posted by alexspt View Post
    I think it's funny some people don't take "off days". Just goes to show how "intense" their training sessions are.
    I agree...Travis should really step up the intensity...lol
    _________
    ______
    ___

    Off Road Journal

    http://www.wannabebig.com/logo/alnlogo_white.gif

    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements – Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

  17. #16
    Rory Parker Behemoth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    5,324
    This thread is full of win, Travis and Cress have spoke golden words in here.

    The intensity needed to push one to the limits of time off doesn't happen easily. If you're newer in your training think about what these advanced guys have just said, and ask yourself if you're really giving it everything to merit this? It's a humbling reminder to leave our egos aside and accept that we may not be as tough as we're convinced we are, and that training our minds at times might be the best routine adjustment that we can make.
    Last edited by Behemoth; 09-12-2011 at 12:44 PM.
    accuflex - LOLZZZZ!!!11one1!! SOEM PPL WORK THRE ARMZ!!!!11!! LETS KILL THEM111

    "You can fake effort with grunts and clanging weights but quiet, consistent hard work coupled with gradual strength increases earns universal respect in gyms" - Steve Colescott



    I'd rather Situation be a member of this board. -Joey54

  18. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    216
    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Cress View Post
    On the other side individuals can get burnt out and a few days off would do them good to mentally recharge. Its not a s black and white as saying you should or shouldn't.
    Couldn't agree more.

    I don't think you have to train "balls to the walls" each and every time you are in the gym to need or "earn" a break. In fact, I would say pretty much everyone would benefit from a short break now and again as a means of "recharging".

  19. #18
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    7,645
    The first signs that I need some kind of "break"* (however you wish to define that...) are general a-holishness and a lingering soreness in the joints and muscles that doesn't seem to go away.

    *For me, a "break" can mean things like more sleep, a change in training (reduced volume and/or intensity, rotating exercises, etc.), reducing stress, improving diet, or (gasp) time off.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

Similar Threads

  1. HCT-12 (adjustment questions (number or reps, and shoulder, calfs,and core questions)
    By lmedinacarreto in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-08-2011, 03:56 PM
  2. Weider 9725 related questions/routine related questions
    By SeriousChange in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-09-2008, 09:23 PM
  3. some questions...
    By frank in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 05-24-2008, 11:21 AM
  4. Questions..Questions..Questions. ROUTINE!
    By Seyborg in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-07-2008, 01:05 PM
  5. Bulking questions, Nutrition questions
    By Common in forum Diet and Nutrition
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 12-31-2002, 05:53 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •