The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
Latest Article

The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
More Recent Articles
Contrast Training for Size
By: Lee Boyce
An Interview with Marianne Kane of Girls Gone Strong
By: Jordan Syatt
What Supplements Should I be Taking? By: Jay Wainwright
Bench Like a Girl By: Julia Ladewski
Some Thoughts on Building a Big Pull By: Christopher Mason

Facebook Join Facebook Group       Twitter Follow on Twitter       rss Subscribe via RSS
Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    mini-hulk imabeast7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    7

    diabetic, cant gain weight, help?

    i have type-2 diabetes(which dr's havent a clue why). my dr wont let me take weight gainer or creatine, im eating all the time. protein shakes leaving me bloated. ive been working out for a while(taking breaks/rests when needed) but cant gain wieght to save my life. i'm 5'3 125 lbs with a max bench of 265lbs. ive done starting strength for a while and still no weight gain although i did improve my bench some. i know my diet isnt perfect since i dont like many veggies or fruit, but i feel im taking in more calories then i should need along with protein. any thoughts or help would be appreciated.

  2.    Support Wannabebig and use AtLarge Nutrition Supplements!


  3. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    University at Albany
    Posts
    2,514
    First and foremost, you need to do A LOT OF RESEARCH on Type II Diabetes so you understand what you're dealing with. This is a lifelong issue that you have to learn to live with.

    Onto weight gain, you're not eating enough. At 125lbs, you're just not big at all. It doesn't matter what you eat, but you need to eat. Weight gain is as simple as eating more food than your body needs. If you're not gaining, eat up.

  4. #3
    Senior Member GazzyG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Melton Mowbray, England, UK
    Posts
    3,273
    Also, 265lbs @ 125lbs? Blimey! Good work!
    Add me on Facebook: Gaz Pengelly

    Best Lifts: | Goals:
    SQ167.5(368.5) | 180(396)
    BE112.5(247.5) | 120(265)
    DL205(451) | 220(484)

    www.garethkpengelly.co.uk

  5. #4
    mini-hulk imabeast7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by RhodeHouse View Post
    First and foremost, you need to do A LOT OF RESEARCH on Type II Diabetes so you understand what you're dealing with. This is a lifelong issue that you have to learn to live with.

    Onto weight gain, you're not eating enough. At 125lbs, you're just not big at all. It doesn't matter what you eat, but you need to eat. Weight gain is as simple as eating more food than your body needs. If you're not gaining, eat up.
    yes ive done alot of research on it. and really? im not big at all? im 5'3" i know that hence the post! im eating all the time. trust me. thanks for your input though

  6. #5
    mini-hulk imabeast7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    7
    yea thanks man. ive always been oddly strong. it helps that i wrestled too lol.

  7. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,377
    That's a very impressive bench.

    As far as the weight gain thing goes, obviously it's going to be complicated by the diabetes. Unfortunately, there's really no secret answer to the question; if you aren't gaining weight now, you're going to have to eat more.

    You might try talking to your doctor (or another doctor who specializes in the area) about what your goals are in weightlifting, and how you can adjust your diet to meet them. Obviously, given that diabetes is pretty serious, it won't be as easy as other lifters who can just 'shovel food into their mouths'. You're going to have to find a safe way to meet the calorie levels you need to gain weight.

    Also, you say you're 'eating all the time'. What does that mean? Have you tried a calorie calculator like fitday.com to track your food? Freshman year of college I was around 135 lbs, and thought I was eating 'a lot'. I started tracking it and it wasn't that much. Once I realized how much 3000 calories really was I got up to 170 pretty quickly.
    23 y/o, 170 lbs

    Do you understand that the second you
    look in the mirror and you're happy with
    what you see, baby, you just
    lost the battle!

  8. #7
    Senior Member DontTakeEmOff31's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    139
    If you really don't believe you aren't eating enough buy a scale and measure how much you are eating. You'll learn pretty quickly how many calories you are really eating. I bet you aren't even at 3000 calories a day. You need to be at 4000 at least if you want to put on some real weight.

    Regarding diabetes you probably should talk to your doctor about serious weight gain and how you can eat. You need 4000 calories a day if not more, and if he wants you to stay away from gainer that makes me think he doesn't want you at high calories.
    Best Gym Lifts:
    475 - 315 - 585

    Best Meet Lifts (220 Raw)
    435 - 295 - 555 (1285)

  9. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    737
    Quote Originally Posted by imabeast7 View Post
    yes ive done alot of research on it. and really? im not big at all? im 5'3" i know that hence the post! im eating all the time. trust me. thanks for your input though
    "Eating all the time" doesn't mean shit if you are diabetic and trying to gain weight.

    First off I agree 110% with Rhodes, you need to LEARN EVERYTHING YOU CAN ABOUT THE MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES. Trust me in this one, I know diabetes both personally and professionally.

    Second, you need a tight diet and a meal plan. A diabetic who cant gain weight concerns me. A diabetic who says they are eating all the time and they can't gain weight really concerns me. Remember, one of the signs of poor diabetic control is weight loss. If your diabetes is not in good control, especially when you are waif little like you are, you will not gain.

    Third, you want to get bigger, you need to eat. I wish i had a dollar for every person under 150 lbs who's told me that they are "eating alot" when they are actually barely consuming maintenance calorie levels. You are diabetic, you will have to do what I do and get the aid of a good nutritionist. Then you are going to have to eat, and eat like you mean it. "Alot" doesn't mean crap in terms of a person eating to gain muscle. You don't eat enough of the right food, you won't gain, its that simple. The kicker with you is you have diabetes, so the more you eat, the harder it may be for you to control the diabetes. You have to find balance in your life with eating and gaining and maintianing control of your diabetes. The simple fact is the diabetes will kill you if you don't control it.

    Finally you need to lift weights to gain weight. 40 sets of pec dec and 35 sets of curls won't put any quality mass on you. You need to squat, bench, deadlift, military press, and do rows. Leave your ego at the door and work the muscles to make your body grow.


    Its really simple, you just need to make the right choices and put in the work.
    Finally ELITE @ SHW..

    Single ply: 931 squat, 760 bench, 530 deadlift and 2180 total
    Multi ply: 960 squat, 770 bench, 550 deadlift and 2250 total.

    The next stop: PRO total.

    HOO's Gym: building the strongest gym in the South, one plate at a time.

  10. #9
    Senior Member synonymous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    177
    I'm curious about this. How does diabetes affect a persons ability to gain weight or lose it? I have only a basic understanding of type 2 diabetes. The image I have is of people who are overweight and eating too much and not exercising enough as those with type 2. I would imagine that the OP's first concerns should be his diet and making sure that he gets his blood sugar under control before it starts to really affect him...going to the gym is a good thing. Eat a lot doesn't seem like a good thing unless what he's eating is NOT spiking his blood sugars.

    Again, I don't know. I'm interested in hearing the science though.
    Ban Censors Donít Let ___ Stop___
    Love Your Enemies - It Really Messes with Their Minds

  11. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    737
    Quote Originally Posted by synonymous View Post
    I'm curious about this. How does diabetes affect a persons ability to gain weight or lose it? I have only a basic understanding of type 2 diabetes. The image I have is of people who are overweight and eating too much and not exercising enough as those with type 2. I would imagine that the OP's first concerns should be his diet and making sure that he gets his blood sugar under control before it starts to really affect him...going to the gym is a good thing. Eat a lot doesn't seem like a good thing unless what he's eating is NOT spiking his blood sugars.

    Again, I don't know. I'm interested in hearing the science though.

    in a nutshell (it is way more complex than this, I'm trying to keep things simple, if you need more info or if I've glossed over something too much, let me know)...

    The body needs glucose as its basic fuel source. This isn't the "Macros" that are consumed at meals, it is at the molecular level, when food is broken down to glucose molecules and then used by the cells of the body for energy. Diabetes is, in essense, a disturbance in the energy production mechanism of the body. The body cannot metabolize glucose as it normally would, so it essentially senses it is starving. As a result of that it institutes metabolic pathways the same as if a person were starving.... fat begins to be metabolized (this is what produces the ketosis associated with diabetic ketoacidosis) and muscle is broken down to amino acids to be metabolize to glucose.

    In a type I diabetic, where there is no insulin production, in uncontrolled diabetes you see a rapid weight loss, ketoacidosis develop, and then death. In a type II diabetic, there is either a) abnormal insulin function--ie insulin insensitivity or b) not enough insulin produced. both of these mean that the body will have periods of nearly "normal" metabolism-- ie early in the morning when the body has had a chance to "catchup" and blood sugars are near normal and periods of abnormal metabolism---ie after a sugar filled meal when blood sugars are high.

    This creates a viscous cycle in Type II diabetics who are not under control. Their bodies resist gaining any type of muscle unless they are in very, very tight control because of the mixed signals that the body gets as blood sugars fluctuate... or worse yet if blood sugars don't return to normal, the development of ketoacidosis or worse.

    That is why Rhodes and I both said the absolute most important thing that needs to be done is to learn everything there is about diabetes and then get it under tight controll. He's fighting a loosing battle if that doesn't happen.
    Finally ELITE @ SHW..

    Single ply: 931 squat, 760 bench, 530 deadlift and 2180 total
    Multi ply: 960 squat, 770 bench, 550 deadlift and 2250 total.

    The next stop: PRO total.

    HOO's Gym: building the strongest gym in the South, one plate at a time.

  12. #11
    Senior Member synonymous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    177
    I appreciate that you put in the time to try an teach me this. What you said makes sense and is what I basically know of how diabetes works.

    Once you've gotten control of your blood sugar (Diet and exercise) and you're within the normal ranges for fasting BG and H1ac levels, you're still diabetic right? You just have it under control. How does one then modify a diet in order to gain weight if it's the calories that's causing those spikes, the calories needed to gain muscle? Does bringing diabetes under control allow for a person to become less insulin resistant and allow for a more normal channeling of sugars?

    I also thought that becoming diabetic was a matter of over-eating and consuming too much processed foods. Is it also genetic? The OP says docs don't know why he's diabetic, but for his size, I have to wonder how he became diabetic.

    I have a fear of diabetes and have episodes of hypoglycemia, which I've found out is associated with diabetes. Doctors have been clearing me of diabetes for the last 3 years. I get tested every 6 months. The way they do it is with a 12 hour fast and they check fasting blood glucose and H1ac levels. My H1ac levels are always within the normal range (Below 6) and my blood glucose can vary from 100 on one test to 140-50 on another. I keep getting the 'You have nothing to worry about.' speech, and it may be so. I'd just like to attack the problem if it should arise. My grandparents have/had diabetes. My parents, uncles, aunts not at all. Still, need to stay on top of things.

    Any info, please do share. Even if it's just links to good reading sources.
    Ban Censors Donít Let ___ Stop___
    Love Your Enemies - It Really Messes with Their Minds

  13. #12
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    University at Albany
    Posts
    2,514
    Quote Originally Posted by imabeast7 View Post
    yes ive done alot of research on it. and really? im not big at all? im 5'3" i know that hence the post! im eating all the time. trust me. thanks for your input though
    Trust me, from someone who has gone from 185lbs to 331lbs, at one point, I know exactly what I'm talking about. If you're eating enough, you'll grow. I don't know about Type II. Maybe that's the issue you're running into. But, it's normally as simple as eating. Hence, my initial response.

  14. #13
    Wannabebig New Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1

    Ectomorph Body Type

    As you have an ectomorph body type, you might have to do things a little differently than the normal body type while watching your Type II Diabetes. You say you eat all the time, what kind of food do you eat? Is it rich in protein? Do you monitor your calorie intake? Do you time your meals? I saw this site on squidoo about ectomorph bodybuilder which interest you but you have to take in consideration you Type II Diabetes.

    Type II Diabetes is well known in our family and relatives and you really have to monitor what you eat and your blood level. Find out which food raises your blood level, etc. Like eating grapes will elevate your blood level, carbohydrates, etc. Not one body is the same. You have to find what works for YOU. Eliminating processed foods helped a lot of. Nothing is better than knowing what is in your meals; you control the sugar, salt, etc. Cooking your own meals requires a lot of dedication but well worth the effort.

    Hope something in this post helps you out!

  15. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    303
    Eat more.

  16. #15
    mini-hulk imabeast7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Klaus Lang View Post
    i think its impossible for a type 2 diabetic patient to get a bit fat on his body. but will say that he can maintain his body by regular workouts at gym and keep his sugar level in control
    most type 2 late onset are overwieght sedetary lifestyle ppl just fyi

  17. #16
    mini-hulk imabeast7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    7
    hi, srry for the late response. no my diabetes is under control. i do eat alot but i suppose i was more focused on taking in alot of protein vs overall calories. my dr doesnt want me to gain weight mostly bc its frowned upon in most cases as you know. he says im healthy n dont need to gain weight. but of course id like to gain another 10lbs and be good. as far as my workout, i typically do the starting strength program. im gonna take a few weeks off and then start over looking at calories and other things and see how that works out for me.

  18. #17
    mini-hulk imabeast7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by synonymous View Post
    I appreciate that you put in the time to try an teach me this. What you said makes sense and is what I basically know of how diabetes works.

    Once you've gotten control of your blood sugar (Diet and exercise) and you're within the normal ranges for fasting BG and H1ac levels, you're still diabetic right? You just have it under control. How does one then modify a diet in order to gain weight if it's the calories that's causing those spikes, the calories needed to gain muscle? Does bringing diabetes under control allow for a person to become less insulin resistant and allow for a more normal channeling of sugars?

    I also thought that becoming diabetic was a matter of over-eating and consuming too much processed foods. Is it also genetic? The OP says docs don't know why he's diabetic, but for his size, I have to wonder how he became diabetic.

    I have a fear of diabetes and have episodes of hypoglycemia, which I've found out is associated with diabetes. Doctors have been clearing me of diabetes for the last 3 years. I get tested every 6 months. The way they do it is with a 12 hour fast and they check fasting blood glucose and H1ac levels. My H1ac levels are always within the normal range (Below 6) and my blood glucose can vary from 100 on one test to 140-50 on another. I keep getting the 'You have nothing to worry about.' speech, and it may be so. I'd just like to attack the problem if it should arise. My grandparents have/had diabetes. My parents, uncles, aunts not at all. Still, need to stay on top of things.

    Any info, please do share. Even if it's just links to good reading sources.
    yes diabetes is also genetic. most late onset type 2 are normally overwieght ppl with sedetary lifestyles. i however dont have diabetes in my family to be genetic and considering my build and the fact i do work out, most drs ive been too say theyre not sure why really. also there is a such thing as pre-diabetes. which means you arent diabetic if you keep your levels normal and dont allow them to get out of wack, and if they do you stand the chance of converting over. hope that kinda helps. i know its short

  19. #18
    Back in business WBBIRL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    The Fridge
    Posts
    5,604
    I can't say much about your type 2 diabetes but here are the plain facts:

    You need to know, in calories, how much you are consuming. A hard, factual number.
    You need to have a basic understanding of your activity levels.
    You need to monitor your weight, twice weekly would be a good amount of times to weigh yourself.

    I say this because your looking at someone who has been up at high as 320 pounds and down as low as 240 pounds and then back everywhere in between. The keys to when I was able to start trimming down were actually knowing, and not guessing or estimating, how much food I was eating.

    I used to guess and estimate... let me tell you I was way off of what I "thought" I was eating. When your tracking your calories, everything that goes into your mouth needs to be counted.

    I know people who were half my size and could lose weight eating more calories then I could while trying to lose weight.

    It comes down to everyone is different and each persons body is different. The principles are the same:

    Eat more calories then your body uses and you will gain weight. Eat less calories then your body uses and you will lose weight.

    So basically start tracking everything you put into your mouth. If nothing else at least calories but a macro breakdown couldn't hurt (protein, fats, carbs)

    If your not gaining weight, you need more calories. If you are gaining weight, and your gaining too fast then you need to lower calories. You don't want to gain fat, or not that much fat anyhow. I'm going to go out on a limb and assume you want to gain muscle. 5 pounds a month is a decently high expectation for how much muscle you can gain in a month.

    I think that if your commited enough and want it bad enough you can gain weight. I'm not very educated on diabetes and have forgotten a lot of the nutritional information I used to know but I'm pretty sure proteins and fats would be more favorable for you to add in extra calories then carbohydrates. Someone else can chime in on that part.

  20. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    737
    Quote Originally Posted by imabeast7 View Post
    hi, srry for the late response. no my diabetes is under control. i do eat alot but i suppose i was more focused on taking in alot of protein vs overall calories. my dr doesnt want me to gain weight mostly bc its frowned upon in most cases as you know. he says im healthy n dont need to gain weight. but of course id like to gain another 10lbs and be good. as far as my workout, i typically do the starting strength program. im gonna take a few weeks off and then start over looking at calories and other things and see how that works out for me.

    You need to approach it differently with your doctor. I know my endocrinologist is very good with my weight---he's also very blunt. as long as I maintain normal blood work, pass my stress tests, and most importantly maintian my diabetes, then its not an issue. I am a powerlifter, he understands that muscle weighs more than fat.

    You can't rush in and announce to your doctor you want to "bulk up 30 lbs". Instead present it as you "want to get into better shape". Quite frankly, you are basically just plain little. Some doctors will try to keep diabetics underweight, but honestly that is an "old school" thinking and it also comes from the long history of Type I diabetics frequently being borderline ketoacidotic and Type II's simply being fat.
    Finally ELITE @ SHW..

    Single ply: 931 squat, 760 bench, 530 deadlift and 2180 total
    Multi ply: 960 squat, 770 bench, 550 deadlift and 2250 total.

    The next stop: PRO total.

    HOO's Gym: building the strongest gym in the South, one plate at a time.

  21. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    737
    Quote Originally Posted by synonymous View Post
    I appreciate that you put in the time to try an teach me this. What you said makes sense and is what I basically know of how diabetes works.

    Once you've gotten control of your blood sugar (Diet and exercise) and you're within the normal ranges for fasting BG and H1ac levels, you're still diabetic right? You just have it under control. How does one then modify a diet in order to gain weight if it's the calories that's causing those spikes, the calories needed to gain muscle? Does bringing diabetes under control allow for a person to become less insulin resistant and allow for a more normal channeling of sugars?
    Sorry its taken me a long time to get back on here. I've been busy with grad school stuff and honestly I rarely go to this board. I thought about it today for the first time in a while. First off, there is 'transient" diabetes in pregant women--brought on by insulin resistance caused by pregnancy hormones and there are some type II's who are very obese who will go off diabetic medications and be able to maintain normal blood sugars just by watching their diet. In their case they also have profound insulin resistance issues. In my mind though, they are always diabetic. You will even see some Type I's who, within a few years of being diagnosed as diabetic, once they get their diet tight and are exercising correctly who can virtually go off insulin. I was that way as a teenager, even eating several thousand calories a day, I was only taking 1-3 units of insulin per day. Why? Because I was young, I was healthy, and I was very, very active. The thing is the units of insulin taken per day are not the issue, it is the maintenance of normal blood sugars that matters. This is also a reason why health insurance company's are screwing diabetics over because they have statistical levels of how many units of insulin they should take per day (thats a personal rant and not related to this).

    Bottom line, once a diabetic always a diabetic in my mind.

    I also thought that becoming diabetic was a matter of over-eating and consuming too much processed foods. Is it also genetic? The OP says docs don't know why he's diabetic, but for his size, I have to wonder how he became diabetic.
    There are multiple factors that play into Diabetes as a disease, ranging from genetics, obesity, diet, viral diseases (this is still thought to be a cause of type I diabetes, autoimmune diseases, pregnancy, alcoholism, hormone imbalances--ranging from thyroid to testosterone levels and many others. You simply cannot say there is one factor that "causes a person to become diabetic". the bottom line with it is a person is diabetic. they need to take the steps to control their blood sugars or the disease can and will kill them.

    I have a fear of diabetes and have episodes of hypoglycemia, which I've found out is associated with diabetes. Doctors have been clearing me of diabetes for the last 3 years. I get tested every 6 months. The way they do it is with a 12 hour fast and they check fasting blood glucose and H1ac levels. My H1ac levels are always within the normal range (Below 6) and my blood glucose can vary from 100 on one test to 140-50 on another. I keep getting the 'You have nothing to worry about.' speech, and it may be so. I'd just like to attack the problem if it should arise. My grandparents have/had diabetes. My parents, uncles, aunts not at all. Still, need to stay on top of things.

    Any info, please do share. Even if it's just links to good reading sources.
    listen to your doctors.
    Finally ELITE @ SHW..

    Single ply: 931 squat, 760 bench, 530 deadlift and 2180 total
    Multi ply: 960 squat, 770 bench, 550 deadlift and 2250 total.

    The next stop: PRO total.

    HOO's Gym: building the strongest gym in the South, one plate at a time.

  22. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    737
    Quote Originally Posted by npakergy16 View Post
    For a person with type two diabetes like yourself, I'm going to strongly recommend a ketogenic diet.

    For the unaware, the ketogenic diet is basically a low carb diet that is high in fat, average in protein and low in carbs. I've personally used this diet to bulk up and cut down and have seen fantastic results with it.

    This is the best type of diet for a person with type two diabetes, as it basically eliminates it. Period. Forget about what your doctor tells you, because a majority of doctors these days don't know the first thing about nutrition.

    I personally know a couple of people who have been on this diet for years and have not had to inject insulin. Not once.

    You have to have strong willpower to be on such a diet, but if you have the willpower, it can change your body and your life. Diabetes will cease to be the master and it will become the servant in your life. You won't have to worry about injecting insulin constantly, because insulin will be virtually non-existent.

    If you want more information on the ketogenic diet then just check out the forum. There's dozens of posts about it.
    You need to learn more about diabetes.
    Finally ELITE @ SHW..

    Single ply: 931 squat, 760 bench, 530 deadlift and 2180 total
    Multi ply: 960 squat, 770 bench, 550 deadlift and 2250 total.

    The next stop: PRO total.

    HOO's Gym: building the strongest gym in the South, one plate at a time.

Similar Threads

  1. Weight Gain vs Strength Gain
    By Supra98x in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-27-2009, 08:58 PM
  2. Diabetic needs help gaining weight
    By photogman in forum Diet and Nutrition
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-24-2009, 05:12 PM
  3. Question about weight gain and fat gain
    By Mort in forum Bodybuilding & Weight Training
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-25-2008, 09:36 PM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-17-2005, 10:24 PM
  5. Best cafeteria foods (college) to lose weight? To gain weight?
    By EdgeCrusher in forum Diet and Nutrition
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-31-2003, 08:26 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •