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Thread: Pulled groin muscle or hernia . . .

  1. #1
    Convicted Felon Kromax's Avatar
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    Pulled groin muscle or hernia . . .

    I've been out of commission for 5 days with an injury that is most likely a pulled groin muscle, but possibly a hernia. The pain is primarily on the inside of my left thigh. I'm going to make an appointment to see the doctor on Monday.

    I'm freaking out, longing to go back to the gym. Damn.
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  2. #2
    Gettin Lean Goin_Big's Avatar
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    gl, hope you're ok.
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  3. #3
    hmm, I like to be big!!!
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    holy christ do pulled groins hurt, lol, screw squats, pulled groins are the ultimate training pain. Good luck and keep icing it.
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  4. #4
    Cottage cheese addict LiftAgain's Avatar
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    If it is hernia get it fixed soon. I prolonged it myself and it eventually made even normal life activities uncomfortable.

    I wish I had got it fixed immedialtely as I got symptoms and not at the point I had to. It would have saved me from lots of harm, not only the fact that I stopped training for several years mainly because of it...

    Feels a bit awkward to feel your gut popping out during training...

  5. #5
    Trying to figure this out JohnCollins's Avatar
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    Kromax,

    Probably won't make you feel better physically, but this probably will psychologically. If the pain is in your thigh, no matter how high up, it is almost certainly NOT a hernia. (I'm no doctor, but I've a double hernia surgically repaired, so I know of what I speak). If it was a hernia, you would be feeling it just ABOVE the crease formed between your abdomen and your thighs when you sit. Can't be below it.

    Good luck, though, I hope you feel better, but stop worrying about a hernia.

    JC

  6. #6
    Convicted Felon Kromax's Avatar
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    Oh sh*t. It's just above the crease.
    "When you have to kill a man, it costs nothing to be polite."

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  7. #7
    Trying to figure this out JohnCollins's Avatar
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    Oooops! You need

    OK, let's look at this again.

    Place your hand flat against the bottom of your abdomen on whichever side hurts, with your fingers pointing to the floor. Left hand for left side, right over right. The tip of your index finger should be right about where the base of your penis is. If the sore spot is under your fingertips somewhere. . .well that sounds like a hernia.

    If you cough with your hand there, you should feel a slight bulging under your fingers. If you do, get it looked at RIGHT away. You can probably continue to train upper body (chest, shoulders, back, arms) but don't do any squats or deads or any lift that stresses your middle a lot until you figure out exactly what's going on.

    What a hernia is, actually, is a tear in the abdominal wall where the testes descended when you were developing in the womb. In most men this never becomes a problem, but sometimes it weakens and the abdominal wall can tear there. Can happen at any age from a young boy to whenever. Happened to me around 40. First it starts bulging, though and if you have a hernia, I'd think you'd have noticed some weirdness, if not discomfort, before. Normally, a hernia won't go from you not knowing you have one to a big problem right away, but I don't know that it can't. Don't waste any time getting it checked, because if the tear lengthens you can get whats called a "strangulation" where a piece of the gut forces itself through the tear and gets stuck. VERY painful and very bad.

    The good news is, the latest fixes are permanent. If you do have a hernia, and need to have it repaired, ask about the doctor about the procedure. Some older docs are still doing the old slice and stitch routine, but the latest technique is less traumatic and a much better, more permanent fix.

    They go in through the navel with a fiber optic and some tools which spread a couple layers of abdominal muscle (they lay over each other in sheets). They then slip in a rolled up mesh screen, unroll it over the tear, staple it in place, and the muscle tissue literally heals through the mesh, locking it in place permanently. This mesh is very tough and you're practically guaranteed to not have any problems with it again.

    Mine felt a little funny for about a year as it healed into place, but I don't ever notice it now. I had a pretty bad double hernia and now I'm lifting away happily--no problems. If you do the old stitch routine, sometimes folks tear the area again. The screen patch is much better. Shop around until you find a doc experienced with that procedure.

    If you end up being told you need surgery, follow the doctor's advice on any activity which should be avoided. Since you like lifting, you ought to schedule the surgery ASAP so as not to delay getting back into your training. If it gets this bad, email me and I'll give you some tips on handling the surgery better.

    Good luck, bud! Ouch!

    JC
    Last edited by JohnCollins; 06-23-2002 at 07:13 PM.

  8. #8
    . Delphi's Avatar
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    If you're referring to the laparoscopic repair as the "latest technique" it ain't necessarily better than the "old slice and stitch routine." I personally know of three surgeons who have abandoned the laparoscopic repair because the recurrence rate is unacceptably high. If somebody is going to be doing heavy manual labor or lifting weights, IMO the best repair is the open Licteinstein procedure, where a sheet of permanent mesh is placed over the entire floor of Hesselbach's triangle. It's also better than the Perfix plug repair, where a piece of mesh shaped like a badmitton shuttlecock is stuffed into the hernia defect. I have found that about 50% of my patients with a Perfix plug repair developed a recurrence within a year, just adjacent to the previous repair. I have also had two colon surgeries complicated by mesh that was placed during laparoscopic hernia repair, when the mesh migrated into the pelvis and became attached to the rectum.

    Inguinal hernias can cause pain on the anterior or medial thigh when the ilioinguinal or genitofemoral nerve is compressed by the hernia.

  9. #9
    Trying to figure this out JohnCollins's Avatar
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    Yikes! There is a doctor in the house! Kromax, I hereby retire and defer to the good doctor. Get yourself checked out.

    I had been told that the laproscopic mesh method had much lower reinjury rates than the older stitch method, but I ain't no doctor. I like my fix, but whatever you do, do have it looked at pronto.

    Thanks, Delphi.

    JC

  10. #10
    . Delphi's Avatar
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    Your earlier post is a good one, JC. The stats you've heard about the laparoscopic repair are pretty widespread in the lay media, scientific articles, and the spiel given out by the companies that sell the equipment for the laparoscopic repair. When I used to do the Plug repair I also told my patients these statistics. The problem with some of the scientific articles is that they were funded by the equipment companies, and IMO some of the articles are tainted by a lack of objectivity. There are still lots of surgeons that still do the laparoscopic repair. If they get good results, I feel more power to them. I personally never did the laparoscopic repair. You've got to keep in mind that this is the personal opinion of one surgeon, not something etched in stone. If I ever have a hernia I will have it repaired by the open technique with mesh.

    BTW, you were kinda bushwhacked here. My name here used to be DelphiDoc but I had it shortened to Delphi. You had a good post. No harm done.

  11. #11
    Player Hater PowerManDL's Avatar
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    Delphi's no doctor. He's just some quack that cuts and pastes off the WebMD website.
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  12. #12
    Cottage cheese addict LiftAgain's Avatar
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    Delphi, sounds like it was the Lichtenstein method that was used on my hernia. The surgeon doing the job told me that he basically put a patch on it and thet the mesh would "melt" into the tissue forming a very strong patch. (?) Just a little 3-4 inch scar left just above my groin as a reminder. The hospital would have released me the same day but because I lived alone I had to stay in for observation over the night.

    Anyways it's been over 5 years now without any probs. Worst time was the first couple of weeks when you had to let gravity take care of your pooping...

  13. #13
    . Delphi's Avatar
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    Originally posted by PowerManDL
    Delphi's no doctor. He's just some quack that cuts and pastes off the WebMD website.

    "I'm not a doctor, but I play one at work."

  14. #14
    Trying to figure this out JohnCollins's Avatar
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    Delphi, is the only difference between the laprascopic and the "open mesh technique" one uses a regular type incision to get the patch in place instead of the laprascope? And I'm curious how the patch I have could migrate. I was told that tissue growing through it would anchor it in place.

    It's been about 4 years since I had it done and I haven't even noticed the patch in about 2.5 years. I was very confident in the fix, but you've shaken that a little bit. Thanks for your posts, you've gotten me quite curious now.

    How you feeling, Kromax?

    JC

  15. #15
    Convicted Felon Kromax's Avatar
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    Ouch.
    "When you have to kill a man, it costs nothing to be polite."

    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  16. #16
    Convicted Felon Kromax's Avatar
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    I have a doctor's appointment for 1:00 EDT. Wish me luck.
    "When you have to kill a man, it costs nothing to be polite."

    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  17. #17
    Cottage cheese addict LiftAgain's Avatar
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    Good luck!

  18. #18
    Convicted Felon Kromax's Avatar
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    Well, it's not a hernia. The dr. did say he felt "pressure on the ring," which means that a hernia might not be too far down the road. He recommended lifting lighter weights, which is going to be tough.
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  19. #19
    . Delphi's Avatar
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    JC- There's different ways of introducing mesh laparoscopically. For a small defect a small patch can be laid on top and the anchored with staples or coils. Some hernias are really too large to be repaired this way. On a big defect all you can do laparoscopically is to shove a huge piece of mesh into the defect and hope it scars in place. This is what happened in the two patients I had who had migrated mesh.

    Kromax- What type of abdominal exercises do you do? Are you used some type of Ab-wheel? I've felt a strain at both external inguinal rings during/after using one, and I'm very sure that I don't have a hernia on either side.

  20. #20
    Convicted Felon Kromax's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Delphi
    Kromax- What type of abdominal exercises do you do? Are you used some type of Ab-wheel? I've felt a strain at both external inguinal rings during/after using one, and I'm very sure that I don't have a hernia on either side.
    I train abs on cardio day:
    3 sets nautilus crunch
    3 sets weighted leg raise
    3 sets side bends
    "When you have to kill a man, it costs nothing to be polite."

    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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