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Thread: Bodybuilding Training for Powerlifter

  1. #1
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    Bodybuilding Training for Powerlifter

    Assuming one was concerned with max strength(powerlifting) do you guys think one could benefit from doing bodybuilding work for legs? Or would one just stick to heavier powerlifting work?
    The only lift I'm proud of at this point is a close stance, ass to grass zercher squat of 170kg x2 at 85kg bw. If only they held zercher squat competitions...

  2. #2
    Strongman Tom Mutaffis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KJDANEXT0 View Post
    Assuming one was concerned with max strength(powerlifting) do you guys think one could benefit from doing bodybuilding work for legs? Or would one just stick to heavier powerlifting work?
    I believe that some volume work / hypertrophy training is going to be beneficial for all athletes, even if strength is your primary objective. Do you compete Raw or Equipped?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mutaffis View Post
    I believe that some volume work / hypertrophy training is going to be beneficial for all athletes, even if strength is your primary objective. Do you compete Raw or Equipped?
    I don't compete in powerlifting yet man, too weak, but when I do compete I'd like to try some raw lifting.
    The only lift I'm proud of at this point is a close stance, ass to grass zercher squat of 170kg x2 at 85kg bw. If only they held zercher squat competitions...

  4. #4
    Powerlifter/Strongman J L S's Avatar
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    theres no such thing as too weak, if you tell yourself that you will never step up and feel ready enough to do it, jump in at the deep end my friend.

    As for bodybuilding training assuming you mean higher reps then yes its fine, at some point it probably would be best to bite the bullet and try some heavier sets but generally 5's/3's and doubles between 75%-95% are your best friend. Theres nothing wrong with building strength through sets of 10/8/6 etc though when you aren't as close to a competition/meet.
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    @JLS

    I didn't really mean too weak as in im never gonna get strong, I just feel that right now my strength levels(especially squats) aren't good enough. I don't really know why I think this, just a personal thing.

    As for the higher reps, I'd like to give them a go but on the few occasions I've tried them I was out of breath and full of lactic acid by the last rep. This impacted my sessions a few days later too. Do you ever get used to it?

    Oh and I don't remember starting this thread by the way, did an admin do this?
    The only lift I'm proud of at this point is a close stance, ass to grass zercher squat of 170kg x2 at 85kg bw. If only they held zercher squat competitions...

  6. #6
    Moderator Matthew Bryduck's Avatar
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    I definitely think you could do bodybuilding styled training while doing powerlifting. Here's how I would do it, you main movement whether it be bench, deadlift or squat and follow it up with accessory movements. For instance, for your deadlift day you would deadlift and follow it by some of these movements like seated row, barbell rows, single arm dumbbell rows, pull ups, lat pull downs, face pulls and the list goes on. I did this style of training and it allowed me to achieve a 1625 total.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Bryduck View Post
    I definitely think you could do bodybuilding styled training while doing powerlifting. Here's how I would do it, you main movement whether it be bench, deadlift or squat and follow it up with accessory movements. For instance, for your deadlift day you would deadlift and follow it by some of these movements like seated row, barbell rows, single arm dumbbell rows, pull ups, lat pull downs, face pulls and the list goes on. I did this style of training and it allowed me to achieve a 1625 total.
    So basically what you're saying is that you build up the strength with the big compound then use higher reps on the accessory to get extra hypertrophy in the desired muscle group? If that's correct it sounds like a good idea. I might give it a go as I haven't really done that type of training before.
    The only lift I'm proud of at this point is a close stance, ass to grass zercher squat of 170kg x2 at 85kg bw. If only they held zercher squat competitions...

  8. #8
    Moderator Matthew Bryduck's Avatar
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    KJDANEXT0,

    That is exactly what I mean. If you want to throw some arm work in, you can do biceps on your back day and triceps on your chest day. Here's things I would think about as well, I would add a shoulder day somewhere in the mix because who wants a big back and a big chest but no delts. Do not neglect your hamstrings or your glutes on your squat days. If you have any questions feel free to pm or if you want me to take a look at a workout your were planning.

    Matt

    Quote Originally Posted by KJDANEXT0 View Post
    So basically what you're saying is that you build up the strength with the big compound then use higher reps on the accessory to get extra hypertrophy in the desired muscle group? If that's correct it sounds like a good idea. I might give it a go as I haven't really done that type of training before.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Bryduck View Post
    KJDANEXT0,

    That is exactly what I mean. If you want to throw some arm work in, you can do biceps on your back day and triceps on your chest day. Here's things I would think about as well, I would add a shoulder day somewhere in the mix because who wants a big back and a big chest but no delts. Do not neglect your hamstrings or your glutes on your squat days. If you have any questions feel free to pm or if you want me to take a look at a workout your were planning.

    Matt
    Thanks for the advice Matt ill be sure to make use of your it when I restructure my routine.

    Right now I'm seeing good gains from my current routine but I feel size gain are getting slower. When it becomes an issue ill PM you for more advice.

    Thanks,

    KJ
    The only lift I'm proud of at this point is a close stance, ass to grass zercher squat of 170kg x2 at 85kg bw. If only they held zercher squat competitions...

  10. #10
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    Just to chime in and give my 2 cents, I do basically the same as what Matt was talking about. Using 5/3/1 method of training. After my compound movement (dl, bench, squat, military press) I'll do 2-4 assistance exercises @ 10-25 reps per set to hammer the muscles some more. Have been getting really great gains with it so far.
    Last edited by langadang; 02-15-2013 at 09:41 AM.

  11. #11
    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
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    Demonstrable strength is driven by two basic components. The first is your nervous system and optimization of it relative to max loads. Optimization includes recruiting more motor units, fiber type optimization via the conversion of type IIA or IIX fibers to be more like IIB, synchronization of the involved musculature, optimization of firing frequency and so on. You can optimize your nervous system with very little hypertrophy. The second main component of demonstrable strength is size of your contractile myofibrils. The larger you make them the more force they can produce and therefore the more force your nervous system can express when trying to lift a maximal load. If you hypertrophy your muscles some percentage of that growth is always of the contractile myofibrils.

    So, the take home message is hypertrophy training is ALWAYS of benefit to the strength athlete not encumbered by a weight class or a sport where increased body weight may impair performance.
    Last edited by chris mason; 02-16-2013 at 10:59 AM.

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