Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32

Thread: Too Much Cardio

  1. #1
    Senior Member Allen Cress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,156

    Too Much Cardio

    Cardio (steady state) is often over used and absued during pre-contest training or with most trying to reduce bodyfat. Trainees think they are doing aerobic activity to raise metabolism, but that couldn't be further from the truth. What aerobic training does is make a person more "efficient" at using fat for fuel. Now to be more efficient at something means to use less of something i.e Fat in this case.

    The last thing we want when trying to lose fat is become more efficent at burning it, we want to be like a high powered V-12 engine and burn fuel as fast and as much as possible, not be a hybrid car and burn less fuel. So if you do 5 days of 45 min cardio eventually you will become efficient at it and to get same results you will have to do more. Its the law of diminsihing returns ( so like a car instead of getting 10 miles to a gallon you get 30 miles per gallon).

    Steady state cardio ONLY burns off calories, it doesn't do anything to enhance metabolism. When/if its used it should be done as sparingly as possible and after so amny weeks should be stopped for a period of time. If applied properly and in moderation it can be useful in losing fat, but in the bigger picture your goal should be to rely on it less and less. This is were proper programming and sequencing of programs comes in.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Invain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,965
    Besides the fact that it doesn't lead to much of an increase in metabolism, I think most people way over-estimate how many calories they're burning when they do steady-state cardio.
    Best lifts: 615/475/660, Raw w/ Wraps
    http://www.youtube.com/user/invain622002

  3. #3
    Senior Member Jonathan E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    478
    After researching this area slightly over the years, it amazes me to see how many people say "they're going for a workout" but only go for a couple miles run with the intention of losing weight/body fat. In reality, you should only be doing it for aerobic fitness/endurance.
    Bench: 350
    Squat: 475
    Dead: 500

    "All people dream but not equally. Those who dream by night in the recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous ones, for they may act their dream with open eyes to make it possible."

  4. #4
    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    12,659
    In addition, steady state cardio is quickly adapted to and the number of calories burned drops DRAMATICALLY. That is why you see people spend hours doing it day after day and see virtually no change in their body fat levels.


    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

  5. #5
    Wannabebig Member Bulking's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    16
    The BBC documentary 'The Truth About Exercise' basically mirrors your statement, Chris. What they did HIIT, but then that got me thinking; Wouldn't HIIT be considered steady state cardio if you do the same thing day after day?
    If you're struggling to gain weight, let alone muscle, Click Here

  6. #6
    Senior Member GazzyG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Melton Mowbray, England, UK
    Posts
    3,272
    Good points. Run for the aim of increasing your cardio fitness, not for weight loss.

    Weight loss is more a function of diet.
    Last edited by GazzyG; 05-23-2013 at 02:07 AM.
    Add me on Facebook: Gaz Pengelly

    Best Lifts: | Goals:
    SQ167.5(368.5) | 180(396)
    BE112.5(247.5) | 120(265)
    DL205(451) | 220(484)

    www.garethkpengelly.co.uk

  7. #7
    Senior Member Allen Cress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,156
    Quote Originally Posted by Bulking View Post
    The BBC documentary 'The Truth About Exercise' basically mirrors your statement, Chris. What they did HIIT, but then that got me thinking; Wouldn't HIIT be considered steady state cardio if you do the same thing day after day?
    Intervals target the anaerobic system, not the aerobic. 2 different energy pathways. Steady state cardio (aerobic)is maintaining a consistent heartrate and perceived exertion level for a period of time. HITT can be overused as well, but has a greater meatabolic benefit than steady state. THe weight room is the first best option. The others have a place when used correctly

  8. #8
    Cardio bunny Alex.V's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Duke
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Cress View Post
    THe weight room is the first best option. The others have a place when used correctly
    THIS is the best statement in this thread. For body composition purposes, NOTHING beats lifting and diet adjustment. ANY activity beyond lifting has an inherently catabolic component that throws another variable into the mix. If you want to be as lean and muscular as possible, even HIIT isn't really recommended- lift consistently to force the body to retain muscle, and adjust energy balance via intake to keep yourself in a deficit.

    From my perspective, cardio should be done for one of two purposes- health or performance. If performance is the goal, the chosen form of cardio (whether HIIT, steady state, or what have you) should be specific to the individual's chosen sport. If health is the goal, a bodybuilder type should do both HIIT and limited steady state (since excessive HIIT can be extremely taxing on the system). If health is the goal, a pure strength athlete should avoid HIIT like the plague, since the strength athlete is already placing excessive demands on his or her muscles and nervous system, and any additional high resistance activity is nothing but detrimental to their chosen goal. These folks SHOULD do steady state cardio, since it won't compromise their strength gains or recovery.

    That said, I have to disagree with one part- there's no mechanism by which increased aerobic activity causes the body to use LESS fat to fuel activity- the body is simply adapting to be more efficient overall. Steady state aerobic activity improves the body's ability to use fat for fuel, but the net result WILL be fewer calories burned per mile over time as the individual becomes a more finely tuned machine.
    "Except Belial. He knows everything. This isn't a sarcastic attack, either. He really knows everything." -----Organichu
    "Alex is all knowing and perfect"-----Jane (loosely paraphrased)
    -515/745/700 bench/deadlift/squat
    Current mile time: 4:23
    Marathons: 3
    Century races: 3
    Ironmans: 1
    Ultramarathons: 1
    Current supps: http://www.atlargenutrition.com/prod...covery/results

  9. #9
    Dr. Subtotal
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,370
    What would be a generalized performance/health cardio for a powerlifter in your view? Obviously on the performance front, there are a variety of things that can aid performance depending on each lifter, but I was just wondering from a generalized view.

    Something like BB circuits or utilizing small extra workouts with minimal rest for performance and walking for health? Would you tailor the "performance" aspect in a block fashion that would mirror the volume/intensity/specificity of the lifting aspect?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex.V View Post
    THIS is the best statement in this thread. For body composition purposes, NOTHING beats lifting and diet adjustment. ANY activity beyond lifting has an inherently catabolic component that throws another variable into the mix. If you want to be as lean and muscular as possible, even HIIT isn't really recommended- lift consistently to force the body to retain muscle, and adjust energy balance via intake to keep yourself in a deficit.

    From my perspective, cardio should be done for one of two purposes- health or performance. If performance is the goal, the chosen form of cardio (whether HIIT, steady state, or what have you) should be specific to the individual's chosen sport. If health is the goal, a bodybuilder type should do both HIIT and limited steady state (since excessive HIIT can be extremely taxing on the system). If health is the goal, a pure strength athlete should avoid HIIT like the plague, since the strength athlete is already placing excessive demands on his or her muscles and nervous system, and any additional high resistance activity is nothing but detrimental to their chosen goal. These folks SHOULD do steady state cardio, since it won't compromise their strength gains or recovery.

    That said, I have to disagree with one part- there's no mechanism by which increased aerobic activity causes the body to use LESS fat to fuel activity- the body is simply adapting to be more efficient overall. Steady state aerobic activity improves the body's ability to use fat for fuel, but the net result WILL be fewer calories burned per mile over time as the individual becomes a more finely tuned machine.
    Trample the weak, hurdle the dead
    http://www.wannabebig.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=132318

    Satisfaction is the Death of Desire...

  10. #10
    Cardio bunny Alex.V's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Duke
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by BloodandThunder View Post
    What would be a generalized performance/health cardio for a powerlifter in your view? Obviously on the performance front, there are a variety of things that can aid performance depending on each lifter, but I was just wondering from a generalized view.

    Something like BB circuits or utilizing small extra workouts with minimal rest for performance and walking for health? Would you tailor the "performance" aspect in a block fashion that would mirror the volume/intensity/specificity of the lifting aspect?
    In my view, absolutely- walking and/or slow cycling/elliptical for general health, 30-45 minutes per session, 3-4 times a week. Easy to compensate for calorically, minimally taxing, certainly won't cause any soreness or result in a detriment to performance.

    As far as performance goes- I'm still on the fence as to whether or not most Powerlifters would benefit from complexes to improve local/specific work capacity. Assuming they are generally in average aerobic condition (as they should be if they're doing generalized cardiovascular activity), I'd still say that local work capacity is better improved via volume and intensity fluctuation rather than incorporation of novel workout modalities such as complexes or circuits. So yes, a loose block training scheme with a focus on work capacity in the early phases (higher rep benching, possibly even using techniques associated with bodybuilding, such as drop sets and multiple sets to failure and the like), with the goal of improving local energy stores, increasing lactic acid clearance potential, etc... which could lead to improved workout quality later on in the pure strength cycles and competition/peaking phase.

    I guess it's really lifter dependent- if local muscular endurance is a limiting factor in training or in meet performance, then it should be addressed via specific, targeted volume accessory work that hopefully has minimal impact on both recovery (i.e., not overtaxing the same systems as the pure power and speed work), and minimal impact on learned movement patterns (i.e., not teaching movement patterns that could cause "un-learning" of technique)
    "Except Belial. He knows everything. This isn't a sarcastic attack, either. He really knows everything." -----Organichu
    "Alex is all knowing and perfect"-----Jane (loosely paraphrased)
    -515/745/700 bench/deadlift/squat
    Current mile time: 4:23
    Marathons: 3
    Century races: 3
    Ironmans: 1
    Ultramarathons: 1
    Current supps: http://www.atlargenutrition.com/prod...covery/results

  11. #11
    Senior Member big ragu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    144
    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Cress View Post
    THe weight room is the first best option
    I was thinking about this statement, and all I kept coming back to was whenever I drop cardio, and only lift, I get heavier. No, not heavier in a sense that I become insanely diesel and pack on gobs of muscle, but I put on more fat. So I'm thinking this must be bullshit, cardio must be the king.

    But then I think a little bit more, and realize that I have NEVER had any sort of decent diet when all I did was lift. The diet was ALWAYS accompanied by cardio. The more I learn, the more I realize I don't know shit. I plan to really focus on fat lost somewhere around Oct, and I gotta tell yah, I don't even know where to start anymore!
    Take a look at my journal, keep me on the right path: http://www.wannabebig.com/forums/sho...-5-3-1-Journal

  12. #12
    Senior Member Allen Cress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,156
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex.V View Post
    That said, I have to disagree with one part- there's no mechanism by which increased aerobic activity causes the body to use LESS fat to fuel activity- the body is simply adapting to be more efficient overall. Steady state aerobic activity improves the body's ability to use fat for fuel, but the net result WILL be fewer calories burned per mile over time as the individual becomes a more finely tuned machine.
    You have contradicting statements. If the body becomes more efficient at using fuel it will burn less of it in the same amount of time. As you said the body is adapting and becoming more efficient, therefore burning less fuel(kcal) for the same activity, which is my point because when someone is trying to lose fat they are looking to burn more fuel and if they do 30 min of steady state for 4 weeks then the body adapts and burns less fuel for that same activity you see less results (as in body composition) so they increase time.

    Overall I think we are on the same page with the bigger picture. Stick to weights and its various applications to increase metabolic rate and retain muscle when looking to lose fat.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Allen Cress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,156
    Quote Originally Posted by big ragu View Post
    I was thinking about this statement, and all I kept coming back to was whenever I drop cardio, and only lift, I get heavier. No, not heavier in a sense that I become insanely diesel and pack on gobs of muscle, but I put on more fat. So I'm thinking this must be bullshit, cardio must be the king.

    But then I think a little bit more, and realize that I have NEVER had any sort of decent diet when all I did was lift. The diet was ALWAYS accompanied by cardio. The more I learn, the more I realize I don't know shit. I plan to really focus on fat lost somewhere around Oct, and I gotta tell yah, I don't even know where to start anymore!
    You are not alone in this thought as many more are in your shoes. Nutrition is a huge component. When combined with a properly designed program the results come. Just work hard, be consistent, and be patient and remember its has to be a lifestyle and something that is sustainable for you!

  14. #14
    Senior Member Allen Cress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,156
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex.V View Post
    In my view, absolutely- walking and/or slow cycling/elliptical for general health, 30-45 minutes per session, 3-4 times a week. Easy to compensate for calorically, minimally taxing, certainly won't cause any soreness or result in a detriment to performance.

    I guess it's really lifter dependent- if local muscular endurance is a limiting factor in training or in meet performance, then it should be addressed via specific, targeted volume accessory work that hopefully has minimal impact on both recovery (i.e., not overtaxing the same systems as the pure power and speed work), and minimal impact on learned movement patterns (i.e., not teaching movement patterns that could cause "un-learning" of technique)
    Exactly!

  15. #15
    Rory Parker Behemoth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    5,320
    Very good advice. Using cardio to get lean is a difficult balancing act. IMO, for body composition purposes, unless you're in a time crunch and/or are more concerned with simply WEIGHT loss > fat loss it should be avoided altogether.
    Last edited by Behemoth; 05-23-2013 at 12:49 PM.
    accuflex - LOLZZZZ!!!11one1!! SOEM PPL WORK THRE ARMZ!!!!11!! LETS KILL THEM111

    "You can fake effort with grunts and clanging weights but quiet, consistent hard work coupled with gradual strength increases earns universal respect in gyms" - Steve Colescott



    I'd rather Situation be a member of this board. -Joey54

  16. #16
    Cardio bunny Alex.V's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Duke
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Cress View Post
    You have contradicting statements. If the body becomes more efficient at using fuel it will burn less of it in the same amount of time. As you said the body is adapting and becoming more efficient, therefore burning less fuel(kcal) for the same activity, which is my point because when someone is trying to lose fat they are looking to burn more fuel and if they do 30 min of steady state for 4 weeks then the body adapts and burns less fuel for that same activity you see less results (as in body composition) so they increase time.

    Overall I think we are on the same page with the bigger picture. Stick to weights and its various applications to increase metabolic rate and retain muscle when looking to lose fat.
    Absolutely agreed- same page.

    My point, though (and you could say this is academic at this point)- say I currently burn 160 calories while running an 8:30 mile, and suppose about 50% of that is from fat (simplification), i.e. aerobic pathways, while the remainder is glycogen.

    As I become more aerobically fit (greater oxygen carrying capacity in the blood, improve capillarization, improved mobilization of lipids from fat cells during activity, etc. etc.), I am capable of generating 100 calories worth of work per mile aerobically, i.e. 100 calories of my expenditure would be from fat at an 8:30 mile. However, overall given my stride adjustments, passive mechanical adaptations, etc., I now only require 145 calories total to run that same distance. So while my body is burning more FAT, it is burning fewer calories overall. The thing I don't want people to think is that your system becomes any worse at burning fat- quite the opposite. It just becomes more efficient overall, so the more cardio you do, the more you HAVE to do to create the same deficit. Same end result, really (excessive amounts of steady state cardio burns fewer calories over time), but it DOES have ramifications for those who might be steered away from it because of this.

    So yes- same advice that you were giving at the end of the day. Say I was running 20 miles a week to create a 3200 calorie deficit. Now I'm in great shape, but only getting a 2900 calorie deficit from the same activity, so suddenly I find myself needing to run more and more and more to control my weight. Not a good scenario!

    I think we're all basically finding the same things here- good discussion.
    Last edited by Alex.V; 05-23-2013 at 01:15 PM.
    "Except Belial. He knows everything. This isn't a sarcastic attack, either. He really knows everything." -----Organichu
    "Alex is all knowing and perfect"-----Jane (loosely paraphrased)
    -515/745/700 bench/deadlift/squat
    Current mile time: 4:23
    Marathons: 3
    Century races: 3
    Ironmans: 1
    Ultramarathons: 1
    Current supps: http://www.atlargenutrition.com/prod...covery/results

  17. #17
    Senior Member big ragu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    144
    Maybe my problem is I over complicate it and look for the quick answer. If I'm reading this correctly, in theory, if I don't do any cardio, cut my calories down, and lift heavy, I should lose weight and get leaner? So as an example, I weigh 230ish. I lift 4-5 days a week as intensely as I know how to. If I cut my calories to 2500-3000 a day, keep about 200 grams of protein coming in, I should see a weight and fat loss? And keep most muscle? Is it that simple?
    Take a look at my journal, keep me on the right path: http://www.wannabebig.com/forums/sho...-5-3-1-Journal

  18. #18
    Senior Member GazzyG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Melton Mowbray, England, UK
    Posts
    3,272
    Quote Originally Posted by big ragu View Post
    Maybe my problem is I over complicate it and look for the quick answer. If I'm reading this correctly, in theory, if I don't do any cardio, cut my calories down, and lift heavy, I should lose weight and get leaner? So as an example, I weigh 230ish. I lift 4-5 days a week as intensely as I know how to. If I cut my calories to 2500-3000 a day, keep about 200 grams of protein coming in, I should see a weight and fat loss? And keep most muscle? Is it that simple?

    From what I've learned, yes.

    Though best to cut the calories by a small amount at first, then cut some more when the weight stops dropping, continuing in that trend till the job's done
    Add me on Facebook: Gaz Pengelly

    Best Lifts: | Goals:
    SQ167.5(368.5) | 180(396)
    BE112.5(247.5) | 120(265)
    DL205(451) | 220(484)

    www.garethkpengelly.co.uk

  19. #19
    Senior Member Jonathan E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    478
    Very good discussion all around by everyone.

    To over simplify and cut down on the variables:

    Say one is trying to get more 'endurance' for their given high intensity sport. (I.E. after running pursuit drills in the 105 degree sun they don't want to kill themselves afterwards as much)

    Obviously, steady state is the best from an aerobic point of view, and therefor the answer for above. However, a lot of HIIT type running goes along with many training templates for these athletes (For explosion, sport specific drills, etc). Is their any carry over from HIIT to general fitness/endurance or are the nervous pathways that different? Or is a balance of steady state/HIIT the way to go so they can hit both sides of the spectrum, similar to speed strength-strength speed training for lifters?
    Bench: 350
    Squat: 475
    Dead: 500

    "All people dream but not equally. Those who dream by night in the recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous ones, for they may act their dream with open eyes to make it possible."

  20. #20
    Rory Parker Behemoth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    5,320
    Quote Originally Posted by big ragu View Post
    Maybe my problem is I over complicate it and look for the quick answer. If I'm reading this correctly, in theory, if I don't do any cardio, cut my calories down, and lift heavy, I should lose weight and get leaner? So as an example, I weigh 230ish. I lift 4-5 days a week as intensely as I know how to. If I cut my calories to 2500-3000 a day, keep about 200 grams of protein coming in, I should see a weight and fat loss? And keep most muscle? Is it that simple?
    Yes.
    accuflex - LOLZZZZ!!!11one1!! SOEM PPL WORK THRE ARMZ!!!!11!! LETS KILL THEM111

    "You can fake effort with grunts and clanging weights but quiet, consistent hard work coupled with gradual strength increases earns universal respect in gyms" - Steve Colescott



    I'd rather Situation be a member of this board. -Joey54

  21. #21
    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    12,659
    Quote Originally Posted by Whoopipally View Post
    Very good discussion all around by everyone.

    To over simplify and cut down on the variables:

    Say one is trying to get more 'endurance' for their given high intensity sport. (I.E. after running pursuit drills in the 105 degree sun they don't want to kill themselves afterwards as much)

    Obviously, steady state is the best from an aerobic point of view, and therefor the answer for above. However, a lot of HIIT type running goes along with many training templates for these athletes (For explosion, sport specific drills, etc). Is their any carry over from HIIT to general fitness/endurance or are the nervous pathways that different? Or is a balance of steady state/HIIT the way to go so they can hit both sides of the spectrum, similar to speed strength-strength speed training for lifters?
    HIIT will build general endurance to a point, yes. Even with HIT your heart rate stays elevated for the entirely of the exercise.


    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

  22. #22
    Senior Member Allen Cress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,156
    Quote Originally Posted by big ragu View Post
    Maybe my problem is I over complicate it and look for the quick answer. If I'm reading this correctly, in theory, if I don't do any cardio, cut my calories down, and lift heavy, I should lose weight and get leaner? So as an example, I weigh 230ish. I lift 4-5 days a week as intensely as I know how to. If I cut my calories to 2500-3000 a day, keep about 200 grams of protein coming in, I should see a weight and fat loss? And keep most muscle? Is it that simple?
    Many do overcomplicate it, but at the same time everything needs to be adjusted to fit the individual, so its not really all black & white. You need to know when to spike calories to keep metabolism from down-regulating, when to back off training volume, designing a program to fit the individual's lifestyle and take it into account.

  23. #23
    Senior Member big ragu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    144
    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Cress View Post
    Many do overcomplicate it, but at the same time everything needs to be adjusted to fit the individual, so its not really all black & white. You need to know when to spike calories to keep metabolism from down-regulating, when to back off training volume, designing a program to fit the individual's lifestyle and take it into account.
    This is where things get tricky to me, and where I tend to fail. When I start to try to do these things without a full understanding of how it all works, I screw it up, get discouraged, and get some chocolate......
    Last edited by big ragu; 05-24-2013 at 05:36 AM.
    Take a look at my journal, keep me on the right path: http://www.wannabebig.com/forums/sho...-5-3-1-Journal

  24. #24
    Rory Parker Behemoth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    5,320
    Quote Originally Posted by big ragu View Post
    This is where things get tricky to me, and where I tend to fail. When I start to try to do these things without a full understanding of how it all works, I screw it up, get discouraged, and get some chocolate......
    You don't need to do those things for the most part. You can. But its entirely simple to efficiently lose fat to the 10% range equally as well without any voodoo tricks.
    Last edited by Behemoth; 05-24-2013 at 08:06 AM.
    accuflex - LOLZZZZ!!!11one1!! SOEM PPL WORK THRE ARMZ!!!!11!! LETS KILL THEM111

    "You can fake effort with grunts and clanging weights but quiet, consistent hard work coupled with gradual strength increases earns universal respect in gyms" - Steve Colescott



    I'd rather Situation be a member of this board. -Joey54

  25. #25
    Senior Member Allen Cress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,156
    Quote Originally Posted by Behemoth View Post
    You don't need to do those things for the most part. You can. But its entirely simple to efficiently lose fat to the 10% range equally as well without any voodoo tricks.
    Very true, but the things I stated are far from voodoo tricks, they are basic things to implement. For some to get to 10% isn't as easy as others and also being able to maintain it.

Similar Threads

  1. 2x25min cardio vs. 1x45min cardio
    By Deadrodent in forum Powerlifting and Strength Training
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 04-26-2005, 01:41 PM
  2. whats better? high calories with cardio or low cal with no cardio?
    By T_Chapman in forum Powerlifting and Strength Training
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 08-15-2004, 12:40 PM
  3. How much Cardio is TOO much cardio if trying to lose weight/fat?
    By GrindingOut in forum Powerlifting and Strength Training
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 05-24-2004, 09:29 PM
  4. Max OT-Cardio or 45 min low intensity cardio?
    By QuadzillaRF in forum Powerlifting and Strength Training
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-24-2002, 11:34 PM
  5. AM Cardio VS. Non-AM Cardio On Low-Carb Diet
    By MonStar1023 in forum Powerlifting and Strength Training
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 01-03-2002, 11:23 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •