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Thread: Benchprogram

  1. #1
    Gymaholic Workhorse's Avatar
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    I have one... puts 50 on in about 12 weeks. Something like that. I tried it and it worked... although this is more for ego than size, just so you know. You'll lift more, but you won't see huge changes in mass right away.


    ** Post it.
    Last edited by Paul Stagg; 10-30-2002 at 11:13 AM.
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    105kg Open IPF Classic Provincial record holder in the squat, bench, deadlift, and total.

  2. #2
    Wannabebig Member
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    Benchprogram

    Somebody who know about a great bench program??

    I need to put on some weight to my bench, and therefore i wondered if some of you maybe have tried a good bench program who me and my friend can use!!
    Last edited by Chuck Sipes; 10-30-2002 at 11:10 AM.

  3. #3
    Wannabebig Member
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    Maybe someone else has a good program too???

  4. #4
    the kid from oz
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    workhorse... why dont you post it so we can have a look??
    thanks

  5. #5
    Grasshoppa
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    Eat a lot and push yourself in the gym...always worked for me.
    Shao-LiN
    "I tried so hard and got so far, but in the end, it doesn't even matter." - Linkin Park

  6. #6
    Senior Member TreeTrunks's Avatar
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    http://www.weightrainer.com/spreadsheets/mm2kadd50.html

    This is the routine I think he is referring to. I tried this routine a couple years ago. It works. Try it, again not for mass, so those of you like me that have a weak bench try this.

  7. #7
    unemployed college grad jimlynch11's Avatar
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    whats a good program for mass? currently im doing flat bench, db decline, db incline, flys, and db flat bench...all doing 3 sets of 8, increasing the weight for each set...any better ways to go for mass?
    Age: 21
    Height: 6'3"
    Weight: 175 lbs.
    Phase: Bulking UP

  8. #8
    Grasshoppa
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    You take 15 sets to failure?
    Shao-LiN
    "I tried so hard and got so far, but in the end, it doesn't even matter." - Linkin Park

  9. #9
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    Why are you not sending the benchprogram to me workhorse??

  10. #10
    Gymaholic Workhorse's Avatar
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    Alright, here is the text for the program... I'll attach the chart as a jpeg in a later post.

    Workhorse

    Step 1 – Determining Your One-Rep Max
    Granted, I used a computer to generate the charts in this workout program, but you won’t need a computer or a calculator to complete the program. You will, however, need to supply one crucial bit of data, and that’s your 1RM. I can’t stress how important this piece of info is, but suffice it to say, it’s the backbone of the program. If you just guess your 1RM, you might as well forget it. This program is based on precise mathematical formulas, and if you try to guess your 1RM or don’t do the test to determine 1RM properly, you’ll get mediocre results.
    To determine your 1RM properly, you should refrain from training chest, shoulders, or triceps 48 hours prior to testing. You should also perform the test before you start your normal workout. No use trying to determine how strong you are in a particular lift if you’ve just finished an incredibly grueling workout, regardless of what body part is involved. You should also warm up properly and make sure you’ve got a conscientious spotter handy in case your 1RM is less than the weight you’ve piled on the bar. Here’s how to determine your 1RM:
    1. Warm up with a light weight for four to five reps. (Doing too many warm-up reps might generate too much lactic acid and screw up your 1RM.) Repeat twice.
    2. Rest two minutes after your final warm-up set.
    3. Increase the weight to one you can handle for eight reps.
    4. Rest three minutes.
    5. Increase the weight to one you can handle for three to four reps.
    6. Rest three minutes.
    7. Add weight, and attempt to lift the weight once.
    8. If you failed, rest three minutes, reduce the weight, and try again. If you succeeded in lifting the weight, rest three minutes, add some weight, and try again. Repeat steps six and seven until you fail at lifting the weight.

    Step 2 - Plugging Your 1RM into the Progression Table
    Take a look at the Progression Table at the end of this article. Once I point out a few things, you’ll see that it’s really very easy. For the time being, pay attention only to the column on the far left marked "1RM." Find the number in that far left column that corresponds to the 1RM you’ve already determined by completing Step 1. Let’s assume your 1RM was 280 lbs. Find the number 280 in that 1RM column, and look at the first three numbers to the immediate right of your 1RM. In this case, the numbers are 220, 235, and 245. These are the workout poundages you’ll use for your first bench-press workout, and if you look at the top of that same column, you’ll see that those three poundages are grouped in column number 1. That 1 corresponds to your first workout. Right underneath that column head are the letters A, B, and C. (We’ll get into these later--suffice it to say, they’re just there to make it easier to find the appropriate columns.) See ‘em? Now look under that A, B, and C; you’ll see the numbers 6, 5, and 4. These numbers correspond to the number of reps you’ll be doing in Bench-Press Workout #1.
    To summarize, your 1RM of 280 lbs indicates that in Bench-Press Workout #1, you’ll be using 220 lbs, 235 lbs, and 245 lbs in your work sets.
    For those of you who tried the earlier version of this program, you’ll notice a few improvements. For one, the Progression Table is set up in five-pound increments instead of ten. This is all part of making a smoother progression. Also, under each workout, there are three columns: A, B, and C. These columns correspond to the columns of the form so that it’s very simple to transfer the information into the right place (A to the A box, B to the B box, etc.). And, lastly, there are no longer sets of eight reps--I’ve discovered lower reps work even better.

    Step 3 - Recording Your Numbers on the Workout Sheet
    Go to the Workout Sheet at the end of this article. Remember the number of reps and poundages we just read off the Progression Table? Write them down, along with the date, in the boxes that correspond to Workout #1. In the case of our example, you’d write 220 lbs in the rectangular box marked A on the Workout Sheet. And, accordingly, you’d write 235 lbs under B and 245 lbs under C.
    Some of you more anal types will want to fill in all the boxes on the Workout Sheet right away... Don’t. I’ll explain why later.
    Although there are three rectangular boxes--marked A, B, and C--that doesn’t mean you’ll be doing only three sets. Take a look at Box A next to Workout #1: it says you’ll be doing one set of six reps. Fine and dandy. However, look at Box B: it says two sets of five reps. Accordingly, Box C says two sets of four reps. All total, you’ll be doing five sets of bench during Workout #1. The exact number of reps and sets varies slightly from workout to workout, but your Workout Sheet will let you know how many you need to do for each training session.
    By now, you’re probably wondering when the heck you’re actually going to work out. Well, that time is now. Do your chest workout using the poundages from the table. ALWAYS DO THE LAST SET TO COMPLETE FAILURE. Afterwards, finish working your chest, shoulders, and triceps as outlined in Table 1—The Workout.
    Once you complete the chest, shoulder, and triceps workout, rest a day or two, and then work back, biceps, and possibly legs, if it’s leg day. Chest Workout #2 will take place on Friday of that first week, and we’ll go back to the Progression Table to figure out your workout poundages.
    Find your 1RM on the right of the Progression Table again. This time, trace along the columns until you get to Workout #2. You’ll note that the weights are heavier this time. Don’t worry, I expect you to get stronger fast but not this fast. The poundages are significantly heavier because you’ll be doing fewer reps. If you look at the top of the page, in column number 2, you’ll see that you’ll be doing sets of three reps, two reps, and a set marked "Neg." Go ahead and write those poundages in the boxes marked A, B, and C. In the case of our example 1RM, these poundages will be 240 lbs, 260 lbs, and 285 lbs.
    If you’re paying attention, you’ll have noticed that the weight used for the third set--the set marked "Neg"—is more than your 1RM max. Hey, what are you trying to do, Shawn? Crush my chest? Actually, negative sets are used throughout the program. The use of negatives can really speed up strength development if not overused. Typically, people are capable of handling up to 20% more weight on the negative (eccentric) portion of a lift as opposed to the positive portion (concentric).
    You’ll do your negative set after your first four "normal" work sets of bench press. Then, you’ll need to find a spotter who’ll help you do your negative set. After you find one, load the bar with the weight specified in the Progression Table. Grip the bar as you normally would for a set, and then have your partner help you unrack the weight. Unlock your elbows, and slowly lower the weight, resisting it all the way. Then, press the weight up with help from your spotter, and rack the weight.
    Now, work your triceps and shoulders as indicated in Table 1.
    Check out my Training Journal HERE

    105kg Open IPF Classic Provincial record holder in the squat, bench, deadlift, and total.

  11. #11
    Gymaholic Workhorse's Avatar
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    Ok, here's the workout itself...


    Table 1 - The Workout

    Monday
    Chest
    Bench Press (Workouts #1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13)
    Dumbbell Bench Press—3 sets of 8 reps
    Shoulders
    Dumbbell Side Raise—3 sets of 8 reps
    Triceps
    Lying Triceps Extension—3 sets of 8 reps

    Tuesday Off

    Wednesday
    Back
    Narrow-Grip Pulldown—3 sets of 8 reps
    Barbell Row—3 sets of 6 reps
    Biceps
    Barbell Curl—3 sets of 8 reps

    Thursday Off

    Friday
    Shoulders
    Rotator-Cuff Exercise—3 Sets of 12-15 reps
    Chest
    Bench Press (Workouts #2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14)
    Triceps
    Weighted Dips—3 sets of 6 reps

    Saturday
    Legs
    Squat—3 sets of 6 reps
    Leg Press—3 sets of 8 reps
    Leg Curl—3 sets of 8 reps
    Back
    Reverse-Grip Pulldowns—3 sets of 8 reps
    One-Arm Dumbbell Rows—3 sets of 8 reps
    Biceps
    Incline Dumbbell Curls—3 sets of 8 reps

    Sunday Off


    Step 4 - The Failure Test
    This program wouldn’t be all that sophisticated (nor effective) if there weren’t some way to gauge your progress and make adjustments accordingly. That’s why there’s a "Failure Test" included in Workouts #5, 7, 9, and 11. Remember when I told you not to fill out the numbers on the Workout Sheet ahead of time? Well, that’s because of the Failure Test.
    (Those of you who are familiar with the earlier version of the program will be relieved to know that the old Failure Test is gone, relegated to the Arthur Jones Museum of Outdated Training Notions. There’s still a Failure Test, but it’s much, much easier to do, and there’s no confounding Failure Table to make things more complicated.)
    Go to the Progression Table once more. Take a look at the top row--the one where it lists the number of the workout with the letters A, B, and C underneath. Note that there’s an "F" under the letter C of Workouts #5, 7, 9, and 11. That "F" stands for failure, and during the third set of the workouts listed, you’ll need to do a Failure Test to determine your progress up to that point. If you "pass" the test, you’ll need to move up one five-pound increment on the Progression Table. If you "fail" the test, you’ll need to move back one five-pound increment. If you just get an average "grade," you stay on course because you’re right on track.
    Let me give you an example using our 280-lb 1RM scenario again. Let’s say it’s Workout #5, and you’re about to do your failure set. The Progression Table says you’re supposed to load 255 lbs on the bar. Now, do as many reps as you can, with good form, of course. If you did only one rep (or couldn’t lift it at all), you’ll need to drop one five-pound increment on the Progression Table. In other words, on your next chest workout, you’ll simply use 275 lbs as your 1RM instead of 280 on Workout #6.
    If you do between 2 and 4 reps with 255 lbs, you’ll continue using the increments and poundages listed for a 280-lb 1RM.
    And, finally, if you do 5 or more reps with 255 lbs, you’re moving too fast, and you’ll need to start using the increments and poundages listed for a 285-lb 1RM when you get to Workout #6.
    You’ll be required to do these tests several times during the remainder of the program. This important feature allows you to progress at your own pace! Here’s a point-by-point rehash of what I just explained regarding the Failure Test:
    9. During the third set of Workouts #5, 7, 9, and 11, you’ll be required to do a Failure Test to evaluate your progress.
    10. Set up the bench-press bar with the weight listed on the Progression Table for your Failure Test.
    11. Using good form, do as many reps as you can.
    12. If you do one rep or can’t lift the bar at all, you’ll need to go back one five-pound increment on the Progression Table. The new 1RM will be used to calculate subsequent workouts, until, of course, you get to the next Failure Test when you’ll check your progress again.
    13. If you do between two and four reps, continue using the same 1RM you’ve been using to calculate the poundages you use for subsequent workouts, until, of course, you get to the next Failure Test when you’ll check your progress again.
    14. If you do five or more reps, you’ll need to go up one five-pound increment on the Progression Table. The new 1RM will be used to calculate subsequent workouts, until, of course, you get to the next Failure Test when you’ll check your progress again.

    A Few More Words on the Nuts and Bolts
    This program takes 50 days. When you think about it, this is a very short time. We’re talking about 7 weeks or 14 chest workouts between you and new, previously unrealized power!
    For those of you who haven’t done this program before, it may seem a bit overwhelming. After all, many of you, if you’ve ever done a chest program before, probably borrowed it from some pro bodybuilder’s routine outlined in some other magazine. In other words, the workout probably instructed you to do 20 sets of bench press using 400 lbs or some other totally absurd recommendation. This is a workout that’s about as personalized as you’ll ever get, and it’s not one based on science fiction. Instead, it’s based on science fact. Spend a little time studying the program, put it to use, and I guarantee you’ll get great results more strength and size!
    Hey, building a great body is just as much mental effort as it is physical!
    Now, let’s look at the steps one more time:
    15. Determine your one-rep max (1RM).
    16. Find your 1RM in the far left-hand column of the Progression Table.
    17. Look across the table to the right from your 1RM to the column under the appropriate workout number.
    18. Fill in the weights listed in the Workout Sheet, matching the workout number and repetition subheads.
    19. Find the weights for the next workout and fill them in one workout at a time.
    20. Use the Failure Test as indicated by the Progression Table and the Workout Sheet to chart your progress and determine new 1RM’s as needed.


    GOOD LUCK!!!!!

    Workhorse
    Check out my Training Journal HERE

    105kg Open IPF Classic Provincial record holder in the squat, bench, deadlift, and total.

  12. #12
    Gymaholic Workhorse's Avatar
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    Here's the workout Table 1
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Check out my Training Journal HERE

    105kg Open IPF Classic Provincial record holder in the squat, bench, deadlift, and total.

  13. #13
    Gymaholic Workhorse's Avatar
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    I'd post the chart... but even as a .gif it's 250K. If you'd like the chart, which you'll need in order to do this program, PM me with your email address. Or if you know how to keep the chart the same physical size but lower the memory it takes, let me know.

    Workhorse
    Check out my Training Journal HERE

    105kg Open IPF Classic Provincial record holder in the squat, bench, deadlift, and total.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Accipiter's Avatar
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    Workouts like that aren't really good. for some they work, but if you miss even one set at the weight they say, you're behind, miss again the next week, or at some other point, and you'll end up failing. I tried it and by the end my bench had gone down.

  15. #15
    Gymaholic Workhorse's Avatar
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    This program tests you every 4th workout and depending on how many reps you do, it adjusts your routine to allow for proper rep counts and weights. I only tried this program once, but it did put 35 pounds on my 1RM.

    I think you're right though Acc, you really have to make sure you're on track and that you're pushing yourself as hard as you can. And then that fact says you should make gains without this program, so its a catch 22.

    Workhorse
    Check out my Training Journal HERE

    105kg Open IPF Classic Provincial record holder in the squat, bench, deadlift, and total.

  16. #16
    Think Tank TMan's Avatar
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    BTW, the Bench program Workhorse posted is the exact same one Tree Trunks posted a link for. You can also get all the charts and the full writeup at the link Tree Trunks provided.

  17. #17
    Senior Member TreeTrunks's Avatar
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    Its an old routine that works great. Yeah your tested every so often, if you fail the test then you need to decrease the weight, if you surpass the test limits to increase the weight.

  18. #18
    Bodybuilding Mythbuster
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    There are so many of these routines out there designed to "PUT TWELVE INCHES ON YOUR BICEPS IN SIX MONTHS" or "PUT TWENTY INCHES ON YOUR CHEST IN SIXTY DAYS", or somesuch nonsense. What works are the basics. Rest, eat and train enough, and you will see results. Repeat as often as needed. I should know. I have been in the Iron Game for almost 13 years now, and during my time, have tried just about every training routine devised. Some were okay, most were garbage. One in particular was very good. ((That was the six by six program that I currently use.) But no program, however good is going to work unless you get the basics in order. Most people however, spend most of their training life going from one program to the next, desperately searching for that one magic routine that is going to make them huge...,meanwhile neglecting their rest, food intake and overtraining on top of that.

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