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Thread: Bench Press Strength

  1. #26
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    ElPietro
    i like what you said about a guy who does 350 being stronger than a guy who arches at 450.......i compete in powerlifting and do 450 with out a arch in my back and dont like the shirt but it has got me up to the 490's in comp. i think they should make people keep there back flat at comp....i may be a little more fair that way
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  2. #27
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    I think that your routine is very good, your lifts are very impressive for 2 years training even though you are pretty big anyway.

    All I'd say is dont max out every chest day....and use dumbells only every second chest workout, keeping your main focus on perfect form in your BB pressed.

    This from one who's been training nearly a year complete natural, loves the bench weighing 70kg I max out at 115kg. Or triples of 105kg.

    I think your lifts are very impressive and maybe it's possible some of your other areas might need attention, maybe if you hit your triceps on your bench day your bench might improve, maybe it wont.

    You obviously need to mix something up though or get a spotter and throw some massive weight on the bar and keep pushing your 3 rep max up.

    I dont know.

  3. #28
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    Originally posted by ElPietro


    I would think that this is bad advice. This is not Basketball and soccer, this is bench, which the primary mover is the pecs. If you want a big bench, you need big pecs. How on earth do other pec exercises adversely affect strength? He is doing those exercises AFTER he does bench, so they have no impact whatsoever on those lifts. He will be recovered before his next workout, so those lifts will have contributed to him having a stronger chest, which will help him with the bench, not hurt him, as you say. He could do more volume on bench, since that seems to be what you are saying, but saying other lifts are bad I think is horrible advice.
    I actually wasn't saying other lifts are bad per se. What I was saying (and probably wasn't that clear) is that all those other exercises may be too much volume and he might benefit from doing only one exercise for a while.
    Last edited by Songsangnim; 11-13-2002 at 07:53 AM.

  4. #29
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    Originally posted by willey
    so all he should do is just bench press, nothing else? in crease his volume a little and that will help?...interesting.

    When I dropped other exercises and just focused on the flat bench press, my press strength went up...to the point where I can press 330 for 5 reps. Unless you can do more, spare us the sarcastic comments. And if you can do more, how about contributing your workout program so the orginal poster has something to build on.
    Last edited by Songsangnim; 11-13-2002 at 07:49 AM.

  5. #30
    Senior Member benchmonster's Avatar
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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by ElPietro
    [B]One point I will add...unless you are competing, what is the point of a big "power bench?"

    Good point. I have often wondered this myself. Guys will profess to be a bodybuilder, but never compete in the sport. Then will ask how to get a big bench, and when a powerlifter (who benches way more than the other people answering) gives his opinion, everyone wants to jump in and say, "Well a powerlifting style bench press is not the best way to build pecs!!!" Well no ****!!

    Building a big bench, and building a big chest is not always the same thing. In fact, it is rarely the same thing. I have never held myself out to be a bodybuilder. I have never competed in bodybuilding, nor do I have any desire to do so.

    I was a weight trainer for a number of years before I took up powerlifting. And guys, I have a shocking announcement for you. If you go to the gym but do not compete in some sport, then you are a weight trainer too. Bodybuilders compete in the sport of competitive bodybuilding. You know, oil, tanning, speedo's, stages, posing routines, that sort of thing.

    Powerlifters compete in powerlifting competitions. They use an arch, a shirt, belts, wrist wraps, and whatever else they can to lift the most weight possible, in an effort to set personal records and occasionally win a powerlifting meet.

    People who go to the gym and train, are weight trainers. I don't care if you have 20 inch arms and a 30 inch waist, with a far better physique than I will ever sport, that does not make you a bodybuilder till you enter a competition. And I don't care if you can bench press 600 lbs or squat 800 lbs, until you enter a powerlifting meet, you are not a powerlifter.

    So, if you are a weight trainer, and your major focus is on having the biggest bench possible, then it would make sense to me to train in the same manner as the people out there who have the biggest benches, and lo and behold, those people are powerlifters.

    The flip side of that token is, that if you want to look like a bodybuilder, and having a good looking body is your primary focus, then you should train like the people who have the kind of body you desire. i.e. bodybuilder style training.

    I rarely post here, and this is why. When someone asks how do i get stronger, I post. I never post on how do I prepare for a bodybuilding contest threads, cause I don't know jack about that. But people ask how to get strong, I tell them the truth about it, and I end up with a ton of people saying one of two basic things.

    1. Well, that is not the best way to develop hypertrophy. (when I am talking about increasing strength)
    2. Well that is not the conventional way of doing things, so I don't buy it.

    Guys, bodybuilding is not the same thing as gaining strength. Strength sports such as olympic lifting, powerlifting, strongman, highland games, and field events (hammer, shot, discus, javelin) are not remotely the same thing as bodybuilding. In many ways strength sports and bodybuilding are diametrically opposed.

    Strength sports is about moving the most amount of iron with the least amount of bodyweight, while bodybuilding is honestly, not much different from runway modeling. By this I mean, it is all about looks. Who cares how much Ronnie Coleman can squat, or bench? It doesn't make any difference at all. What he looks like is all that matters on contest day, while in strength sports, what you can do, not what you look like, is all that matter come contest day.

    I think there would be a lot less dissention on this and many other boards if people would realize there is a vast difference between looking good/big/like a bodybuilder, and being strong and athletic.

    B.

  6. #31
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
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    I'd like to see you post here MORE often.

    Just not in a speedo.

    Great post. I would like to point out that regardless of the end goal or result, we are ALL lifters, and there are lots of common training techniques that apply to us.

    While a bodybuilder may not care what his bench press is, making it bigger will allow him to use more weight (possibly) on other things that may lead to bigger triceps (for example)

    Powerlifters are often trying to gain mass (for example, I've seen it suggested that one work on getting bigger rear delts to help improve the fit of a bench shirt), certianly the hypertrophy training a bodybuilder would use might be applicable.

    And there are guys pout there (like me), who are going to compete as PLers (December 7th!), but know damn well they'll never really excel at it (total elite)- but instead use it as a fun way to garner the health benefits of weight training and continue to look good nekkid. And maybe they'll prove themselves wrong in the process.

    Both styles of training lend themselves to the recreational weight trainer, if for nothing else, a little change of pace or motivation.
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  7. #32
    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by benchmonster
    [B]
    Originally posted by ElPietro
    One point I will add...unless you are competing, what is the point of a big "power bench?"

    Good point. I have often wondered this myself. Guys will profess to be a bodybuilder, but never compete in the sport. Then will ask how to get a big bench, and when a powerlifter (who benches way more than the other people answering) gives his opinion, everyone wants to jump in and say, "Well a powerlifting style bench press is not the best way to build pecs!!!" Well no ****!!

    Building a big bench, and building a big chest is not always the same thing. In fact, it is rarely the same thing. I have never held myself out to be a bodybuilder. I have never competed in bodybuilding, nor do I have any desire to do so.

    I was a weight trainer for a number of years before I took up powerlifting. And guys, I have a shocking announcement for you. If you go to the gym but do not compete in some sport, then you are a weight trainer too. Bodybuilders compete in the sport of competitive bodybuilding. You know, oil, tanning, speedo's, stages, posing routines, that sort of thing.

    Powerlifters compete in powerlifting competitions. They use an arch, a shirt, belts, wrist wraps, and whatever else they can to lift the most weight possible, in an effort to set personal records and occasionally win a powerlifting meet.

    People who go to the gym and train, are weight trainers. I don't care if you have 20 inch arms and a 30 inch waist, with a far better physique than I will ever sport, that does not make you a bodybuilder till you enter a competition. And I don't care if you can bench press 600 lbs or squat 800 lbs, until you enter a powerlifting meet, you are not a powerlifter.

    So, if you are a weight trainer, and your major focus is on having the biggest bench possible, then it would make sense to me to train in the same manner as the people out there who have the biggest benches, and lo and behold, those people are powerlifters.

    The flip side of that token is, that if you want to look like a bodybuilder, and having a good looking body is your primary focus, then you should train like the people who have the kind of body you desire. i.e. bodybuilder style training.

    I rarely post here, and this is why. When someone asks how do i get stronger, I post. I never post on how do I prepare for a bodybuilding contest threads, cause I don't know jack about that. But people ask how to get strong, I tell them the truth about it, and I end up with a ton of people saying one of two basic things.

    1. Well, that is not the best way to develop hypertrophy. (when I am talking about increasing strength)
    2. Well that is not the conventional way of doing things, so I don't buy it.

    Guys, bodybuilding is not the same thing as gaining strength. Strength sports such as olympic lifting, powerlifting, strongman, highland games, and field events (hammer, shot, discus, javelin) are not remotely the same thing as bodybuilding. In many ways strength sports and bodybuilding are diametrically opposed.

    Strength sports is about moving the most amount of iron with the least amount of bodyweight, while bodybuilding is honestly, not much different from runway modeling. By this I mean, it is all about looks. Who cares how much Ronnie Coleman can squat, or bench? It doesn't make any difference at all. What he looks like is all that matters on contest day, while in strength sports, what you can do, not what you look like, is all that matter come contest day.

    I think there would be a lot less dissention on this and many other boards if people would realize there is a vast difference between looking good/big/like a bodybuilder, and being strong and athletic.

    B.

    I agree for the most part. I don't think that the difference is quite as vast as you propose. Part of that "vast" difference in the strength between an equally trained bodybuilder and powerlifter, assuming similar genetics, is the equipment and technique involved with the lifts. In other words, if a bodybuilder were to take a wider grip on the bar (assuming that was best for him), practice a proper arch, change the groove through which he moves the bar, and wear a double ply bench shirt, he would most likely have a very similar bench press to a powerlifter.

    Another part of the difference is that many powerlifters become that because of a genetic propensity for strength (better attachments for better leverage, superior ability to recruit fibers etc.).

  8. #33
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    I agree with you benchmonster, but I will expand on your contention.

    Strength cannot continue to increase unless increased hypertrophy is attained. So while the two are trained for differently, they do walk hand in hand in some facets.

  9. #34
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    Originally posted by ExtremeAnabolic



    When I dropped other exercises and just focused on the flat bench press, my press strength went up...to the point where I can press 330 for 5 reps. Unless you can do more, spare us the sarcastic comments. And if you can do more, how about contributing your workout program so the orginal poster has something to build on.
    it was never meant to come across as sarcastic. do all new members here get treated like this. i thought it was interesting just to do bench, it was just a comment. have a pleasent day
    Age 39, wt 255, ht 5'7''. 23 yrs lifting and supps.

  10. #35
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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by benchmonster
    [B]
    [i]
    People who go to the gym and train, are weight trainers. I don't care if you have 20 inch arms and a 30 inch waist, with a far better physique than I will ever sport, that does not make you a bodybuilder till you enter a competition. And I don't care if you can bench press 600 lbs or squat 800 lbs, until you enter a powerlifting meet, you are not a powerlifter.



    .

    B.
    I would have to disagree with this. Let's say someone decided (just for a laugh) to enter a bodybuilding competition. Let's also say this person did no weight training at all. Now he may place dead last, but that is not the point. Is he a bodybuilder JUST because he entered a bodybuilding competition? I would submit that entering a bodybuilding competition is NOT what makes you a bodybuilder. What makes you a bodybuilder is LIFESTYLE, not some silly competition. What is the magical thing about a competition that changes people from "a weight trainer" to a "bodybuilder"? There is none, period.

  11. #36
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    Somebody who plays football on a real team is a football player. Somebody who plays football in his backyward with friends is not, even if he has better hands.

    Yes, these here are individual sports, but they're still sports. Unless you compete, you're considered a hobbyist.
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  12. #37
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    I agree with ExtremeAnabolic, bodybuilding is a lifestyle, although it is often seen best in competitions. The definition of "body building" is "The practice of developing the body through physical exercise and diet, esp. for competitive exhibition." Thus, although competitions are the quintessential expression of bodybuilding, it is not a requirement.

  13. #38
    WBBs motivational Speaker Rock's Avatar
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    when I bench I only lift it 60% of my full room, it does wonder for my strength, try it.
    A big thanks to all my friends in the USA, I am deeply grateful for your hospitality and kindness.

  14. #39
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    what i think he's asking, and what id also like to know:
    of any tips to increase ur bench in a bodybuilding style, to benifet the pecs
    "The whole jedi thing was just not compatible with my lifestyle. My master was jelous he was always holding me back, -"be mindfull of the future, but live in the present"- what the hell does that mean? I even got my arm cut off...it just sucked. So i switched to the dark side and i havent looked back once...Now i am shooting lightning from my fingertips, choking people over the phone, i even get to wear a cape.....its just boss. My name is Anikin skywalker and i am a sith lord."

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    age: 19
    height: 5'8'' (im lieing its probably 5'7'')
    weight: 159-165 lbs (morning and day)
    bodyfat: 8.6
    bench:315
    squat:405
    Deadlift:500

    goals for end of the year 405/500/600 at 170-175(with the 8pack)

    other: dips 3 and a quarter plates for 4 reps

  15. #40
    Jack's Utter Surprise Saturday Fever's Avatar
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    Why do you want to increase your bench if your goal is bodybuilding? Hypertrophy is not about lifting heavy weights, that notion needs to be wiped out.

  16. #41
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    Originally posted by Belial
    Somebody who plays football on a real team is a football player. Somebody who plays football in his backyward with friends is not, even if he has better hands.

    Yes, these here are individual sports, but they're still sports. Unless you compete, you're considered a hobbyist.

    However, bodybuilding is not like other sports. Unlike other sports you WEAR your sport. It is a 24/7 sport unlike say touch football. It's about LIFESTYLE, not competing. If you have someone who just lifts weights, then yes I could agree that person is a hobbyist. But if you have someone who diets, trains, poses, oils, tans, in short does everything a competitive bodybuilder does except compete, I would say that describes something that goes way beyond a hobby, or mere weight training. Again it is about your lifestyle. Other sports can't really be compared in this context. Also (sorry about getting picky) but the definition of bodybuilding is"developing the body through physical exercise and diet". If you do that, then by extension I feel you can be considered a bodybuilder. Not trying to be picky or a smart ass here. Just making the attempt to show you where I am coming from.

  17. #42
    Senior Member benchmonster's Avatar
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    Well we are going to have to just agree to disagree here ExtremeAnabolic. If you have a tan, a 50 inch chest a 30 inch waist, 20 inch arms, 32 inch thighs, are ripped, and look great but don't compete, then you are a very physically impressive weight trainer.

    And yes, if you enter a meet, and compete in a sport such as bodybuilding, then you are a bodybuilder. If you enter and compete in the sport of powerlifting, then you are a powerlifter.

    Nothing wrong with being a hobbyist. I am not a race car driver, even though I might like to drive fast on occasion. If I raced mini sprints on the weekend, then I would be a race car driver, even if I sucked at it.

    But don't sweat the semantics. If you don't want to compete, then don't compete. I could give a rat's ass. Just get out of my way when I am needing the power rack.

    B.

  18. #43
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    Originally posted by benchmonster
    Just get out of my way when I am needing the power rack.

    B.
    Amen
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  19. #44
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    semantics

    Benchmonster, thanks for some solid opinions from someone who obviously knows. As for the people who just seem to want to disagree for the sake of it... go to law school!

  20. #45
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    Semantics? This has nothing to do with semantics. The dictionary definition defines bodybuilding as "the practise of developing the body through physical exercise and diet". Competition is simply taking it one step further, NOT a requirement for being one. But I quite agree with magoo. Go to law school and learn how to argue, Mr. magoo.
    So someone who does not weight train or diet, yet enters a competion for "the h*ll of it" is a bodybuilder because he entered a competion?

    On a related note, how is it we are able to argue with and understand each other? Because we all (or mostly) speak English as our mother tongue. How do we agree on what a word means? We use the dictionary. I may be a non-competitive bodybuilder, but I am a bodybuilder regardless. But I agree, I'll step out of the way of the power rack. Just return the favor and move out of the way of the mirror.

    P.S. We'll agree to disagree on this one.

  21. #46
    Cardio bunny Alex.V's Avatar
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    As long as you all admit that I'm sexier than either of you.

    PS- Wow. Agreeing to disagree? On WBB? Good lord.

    I'm proud of you boys.
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  22. #47
    Senior Member benchmonster's Avatar
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    ExtremeAnabolic,

    I will gladly strike that bargain with you. I have no use for the mirror. I built a gym in my house and there are no mirrors there. I train at a hardcore gym in a monolift for squat days, and no mirror there either. So, (shakes hands) you have a deal.

    Magoo,

    Ironic you should say that. I myself am a trial lawyer. No kidding.

    B.

  23. #48
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    Originally posted by Rock
    when I bench I only lift it 60% of my full room, it does wonder for my strength, try it.
    what do u mean by this Rock? could u explain this to me? thanx
    age:22
    weight: 155?
    height: 5'9"

    -LONGER TERM GOALS-
    benchpress: 275x1
    military press: 160x1
    deadlift: 405x1

  24. #49
    Jack's Utter Surprise Saturday Fever's Avatar
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    He works out with 60% of his 1RM. A lot of Westside is based on that range, oddly enough.

  25. #50
    Super Elite shredder's Avatar
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    ahh i see, what i wonder how many reps he uses...
    age:22
    weight: 155?
    height: 5'9"

    -LONGER TERM GOALS-
    benchpress: 275x1
    military press: 160x1
    deadlift: 405x1

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