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Thread: Height

  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member Grahf's Avatar
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    Height

    Ok, now I know this has probably been asked a million times so I hope you people bear with me. I'm 14 and I am around 5"6. I play basketball and weightlift. I really wanna be taller (around 6"). I feel this is possible since my dad is around 5"8, my mom in 5"7 and my gramps is like 6"0.

    I've been looking all over the place, but I've gotten mixed answers and am very confused. Does weightlifting stunt growth in height? I've heard all sorts of things such as if your work out your hormones will focus on repairing muscle instead of growing bone, to the old growth plate theory. I lift with proper form, and I lift with reasonable weight. But sometimes, I feel sore in my back near the spine and am afraid that I've been injuring my growth plates.

    I hope someone here and make me feel confident enought to lift with out worrying about not growing. Please don't just respond with a yes or no, please give me some evidence of your reply.

    Living evidence is even better, because all I see are short buff guys. Is there anyone here who is tall and has started lifting in his teens?

    Thanks all.

  2. #2
    maximum electronica orbital's Avatar
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    I don't know if there is any evidence that it stunts your growth or not. I started lifting at age 18 and I am now 6'0, but my family is also relatively tall.
    Man, if he do but live within the light of high endeavors, daily spreads abroad his being armed with strength that cannot fail.

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  3. #3
    Diesel Hercule's Avatar
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    Hey man. WElcome. NO! WEIGHTLIFTING DOES NOT STUNT YOUR GROWTH! I am 14, and have been powerlifting for a year now. I am 5'10", and I havn't slowed at all in growth since I started lifting, normal and right on track. That is just a myth. Good luck!

  4. #4
    Senior Member AstronautJones's Avatar
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    I haven't ever heard of weight training stunting one's height. Height is determined primarily by genetics AFAIK. Being 6'2'' is good. . .

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    Banned Reinier's Avatar
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  6. #6
    3 Time World Champion
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    I never lifted weights until I was 18 and I am 6'9".......so I say do not lift them or you will be shorter......



    Honestly who knows? because the person lifts at a young age, there is no way to know how tall they would be if he did not...it like trying to determine someones genetic potential before they reach it....in my opinion. However, I probably would say ask your doctor and work on speed and shooting skills.....

  7. #7
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    Yeah weightlifting makes me play basketball badly.....

    do u wanna be a baller or a mauler...or some such anecdote...

  8. #8
    Magically delicious Shane's Avatar
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    The possibility of strength training stunting your growth is greatly exaggerated. You probably have a greater chance of stunting your growth due to the ballistic aspect of many sports than from strength training. And even that is so unlikely it's not worth worrying much about.
    "you are like my yoda." - chops

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  9. #9
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    Originally posted by Shane
    ballistic aspect
    Ballistic: Of or relating to the study of the dynamics of projectiles.

    Aspect: A way in which something can be viewed by the mind


    Please explain how this "ballistic aspect" is in any way whatsoever likely to stunt pre-determined genetic growth.

    In no less than 1500 words.
    Last edited by WestyHeadbanger; 02-06-2003 at 05:03 AM.

  10. #10
    Bodybuilding Mythbuster
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    Originally posted by WestyHeadbanger


    Ballistic: Of or relating to the study of the dynamics of projectiles.

    Aspect: A way in which something can be viewed by the mind


    Please explain how this "ballistic aspect" is in any way whatsoever likely to stunt pre-determined genetic growth.

    In no less than 1500 words.

    This could get nasty.outnumber

  11. #11
    II MrWebb78's Avatar
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    my dad is 5'7, my mom is 5'10

    i ended up at 6'3

    if i didnt look like my dad id be askin the mailman if he was my father...

    anyways i started lifting weights in school at 15, and a little more seriously at 17-18. ive always "heard" how it can stunt your growth, but don't think it's true. the internet is a free library of info, use it to your advantage.

  12. #12
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    Now, I could be totally wrong, but I would think that if you try to bulk you would probably lose some height unless you ate a lot of protien. If the protien is going to building up muscles, then it's not going towards growing...at the same time, I would think that cutting wouldn't matter at all. And I've seen so many short and buff people my age (16) that have tall parents that I think that it's something to be worried about...

    Of course, my logic could be totally wrong.

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    .......

    Ok I'm not going to use any type of science, just an example, myself. I'm 6'4 and growing, I've been lifting seriously since I was 11, which included heavy squats. My dad's 5'11, and my mom is 5'4, really lifting has nothing to do with it, diet does. (btw I'm 16)

  14. #14
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    Yeah, but you may well be 6'9 now had you not been lifting.

    Still, I would think that if have enough protien it won't matter how heavy you lift.

  15. #15
    Rory Parker Behemoth's Avatar
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    Why would eating more protein during a bulk stunt your growth? For one, protein isn't even used by the bones much at all, and secondly on a bulk you eat more to compensate for the amount you need. You'd think that eating more would make you grow bigger, eating less on a cut could potentially lack some vitamins and minerals and there would be more likely to not grow. But I think it's total bollox that weightlifting stunts growth.

    Just drink your milk pal, ever see the commercial with mario?
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  16. #16
    Senior Member benchmonster's Avatar
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    weight lifting causing you to be shorter is an old wives tale. It got started cause some genius noticed that bodybuilders, weightlifters and powerlifters tended to be shorter than average. Go to any powerlifting meet and you will see what I mean. A six foot tall person at a powerlifting meet is a giant.

    Ed Coan is the greatest powerlifter to ever live and he is a whopping five foot six inches tall. Kenny Patterson, who benched over 700 at age 22 is five six. Louie Simmons might be even shorter. Are they short because they lift weights?

    Or is it that they excel at lifting weights because their shorter stature gives them leverage advantages in a given weight class in comparison with a taller person who has to spread that same body mass over a taller frame?

    Saying weightlifting makes you short is like saying basketball makes you tall. Nobody ever says that, tho do they? Weightlifting is hard, most people don't have the sac to do it, and they look for any excuse to avoid things that are hard.

    It is much easier to say, "no I don't want to lift weights, it will stunt my growth" than it is to get underneath a heavy bar and squat it down to the ground and back a few thousand times before your teen years are over.

    B.

  17. #17
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    AMen brother bench!

  18. #18
    Senior Member smalls's Avatar
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    Great post, benchmonster!
    Diet is key, the calorie is king

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  19. #19
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    I've been where you are dawg, im just a bit older than you.
    I certainly hope that weighlifting dosn't stunt your growth. Im pretty sure it dosn't.

    It may however give you the appearence of being smaller than you actualy are. Because of mass gains.

    Bottom line, start lifting! And never go back!
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  20. #20
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    I said that weight lifting (while your body is still growing) may be potentially bad for your growth IF YOU DON'T eat enough protien. I probably have made a mistake, but I was assuming that your muscles & bones need to grow in order to grow, and if you're lifting weights and you're growing out, then the protien is going to go there rather than to just make you taller. Bottom line is that you need enough protien.

    Also, by cut I was being retarded..I meant you should be fine to just do 15 rep sets even without a whole lot of protien....it probably won't effect your growth at all.

    Also, most people who were pretty buff pre high-school I recall being very short...

    And, once again, I could be totally wrong.

  21. #21
    Wannabebig Member Grahf's Avatar
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    Bump

    I don't think eating enough protein has to do with growing at all. Of course you could have protein deficiency, but that's hardly likely to happen.

  22. #22
    Magically delicious Shane's Avatar
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    Originally posted by WestyHeadbanger


    Ballistic: Of or relating to the study of the dynamics of projectiles.

    Aspect: A way in which something can be viewed by the mind


    Please explain how this "ballistic aspect" is in any way whatsoever likely to stunt pre-determined genetic growth.

    In no less than 1500 words.
    LOL. Sorry I just saw this thread again. No way am I spending 1500 words on this. But ok.

    ballistic -
    1 : of or relating to ballistics or to a body in motion according to the laws of ballistics
    2 : suddenly and extremely upset or angry : WILD -- usually used with go.

    Sorry had to put that second definition in there cuz I thought 'usually used with go' was funny. Makes me think of Top Gun.

    aspect -
    2 a (1) : appearance to the eye or mind (2) : a particular appearance of countenance : MIEN b : a particular status or phase in which something appears or may be regarded.

    Anyway...

    Let me give an example of what I mean.

    Let's take the epiphyseal plate at the top of the femur as an example. And let's use the squat vs. jumping up as an example.

    Let's assume a pre-teen (about 11-12), about 140 lbs, is the subject. We'll call him Westy.

    If you take Westy and have him squat 100 lbs. That will put pressure on the skeletomuscle system, including many of the growth plates (such as the epiphyseal). But the force is not sudden and should be easy for the body to tolerate.

    If you take Westy and have him go out and play a game of basketball and he leaps in the air about 12" that is also going to put pressure on some of the growth plates upon take off and even moreso on the landing. And even though he does not have 100 lbs on his back as with the squat, the pressure of hitting the ground upon landing is more sudden so it can cause more trauma. The force could be greater (it'd depend on how much he was squatting vs. his weight, height of jump, the surface, etc). It's just as you could lay a 45 lb plate on your foot and it would feel uncomfortable but it wouldn't cause damage. But if you dropped a 10 lb. plate from two feet on your foot it would cause pain and possibly injury.

    And that is even without considering the repeated stress. If Westy did 3 sets of 10 reps with the squat that would be 30 reps, or 30 'exposures' I guess you could say, to the stress (though he is exposed to the stress the entire time the weight is on his back). But on that basketball court Westy is going to be exposed to the ground impact forces far more than 30 times if he's playing basketball for more than a few minutes. Most growth plate injuries are caused by overuse and other physical activity than weight training. There is no evidence weight training is more likely to stunt growth than any other physical activity is going to. I suppose that, because of the strengthened muscles, you could even make an argument it would slightly decrease the odds of stunted growth.

    I think a young person could be risking it if they were using very heavy loads and poor form. But if they are supervised and train sensibly for their age there shouldn't be a problem.

    So that's my explanation. I could break out the physics and see how the numbers work out but I hate physics so I'd rather not unless you REALLY want me to. Damn biomechanics.

    *****

    Just for you guys that are still in your early teens and worried about the possibility of damaging your growth plates I broke out the Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning to find the studies they used to support their position (which is the same as mine and most others here from the looks of it). These are two studies they use to support their position:

    Faigenbaum, A., W. Westcott. C. Long, R. LaRosa-Loud, M. Delmonico, and L. Micheli. Relationship between repetitions and selected percentages of the one repetition maximum in healthy children. Pediatr. Phys. Ther. 10:110-113. 1998.

    Ramsay, J., C. Blimkie, K. Smith, S. Garner, and J. MacDougall. Strength training effects in prepubescent boys. Med. Sci. Sports Exerci. 22:605-614. 1990.

    I know quite a few people who started lifting between the ages of 12-15, as I'm sure most of you do, and never seen any signs of stunted growth due to lifting. So relax, be smart, and lift.
    Last edited by Shane; 02-10-2003 at 12:13 AM.
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    "you are not like yoda at all!" - chops

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  23. #23
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    I hate to tell you Shane, you are very entertaining to yourself I am sure but you are full of C R A P.

    Honestly do you think that using large words makes you sound smart?

    Your explanation was not feasible at all even with those irrelevant references. You used basketball as an example and shot your argument to pieces without even giving me a chance.
    Using basketball as an example of a sport which may stunt your growth is for very obvious reasons bordering on insane, Shane.

    And yes I am sure you could "break out the physics" but you would only be making that up as you went too.

    So here is my final marks.



    Creativity 11/10

    Factual Content .01/10

    Using the phrase epiphyseal plate at the top of the femur:
    negative 600/10

    final mark -588.99/30

  24. #24
    Magically delicious Shane's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Shane
    The possibility of strength training stunting your growth is greatly exaggerated. You probably have a greater chance of stunting your growth due to the ballistic aspect of many sports than from strength training. And even that is so unlikely it's not worth worrying much about.
    Hehe. Full of crap? When did I say basketball was likely to stunt your growth? I said it's probably more likely to stunt your growth than strength training. But I also said in either case the possibility of stunting your growth from physical activity is extremely remote. Thus, the last sentence of my first post on this thread which stated "And even that is so unlikely it's not worth worrying much about."

    I used basketball because it's an obvious example of a sport that doesn't stunt your growth even though it may be more stressful on the joints than weight training. Maybe I should of been clearer on that but I figured it would be obvious. My point was that weight training is as unlikely to stunt your growth as most other sports, including basketball. So how did I shoot my argument to pieces? Care to refute?

    I'll be the first to say that using large words doesn't make someone smart. The only large word I used was epiphyseal plate because that's the growth plate that usually is damaged by physical activity. Remember who was the first to throw a definition up. But I didn't make this up as I went along. They touched on topics such as this in biomechanics.

    LMAO at 'final mark -588.99/30'. I gotta bump that up to at least -500/30 somehow.
    Last edited by Shane; 02-10-2003 at 02:23 PM.
    "you are like my yoda." - chops

    "you are not like yoda at all!" - chops

    "shh...I'm only gay for pay" - ECTX

    "no matter how much you lift, just remember that on the other side of the world, a little chinese girl is warming up with your max" - bIgHwN86

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  25. #25
    Indifferent Wu36's Avatar
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    Heres my (uneducated) opinion.
    For every short, well built person you see, im sure you see at least one person of the same height who doesnt train.

    I think bench made a great point, and the same seems to apply to wrestlers in the lighter weight classes (103-130 etc). Do you see so many short 103's because wrestling stunts growth or because a 6'5 103 pounder would resemble a shoelace.

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