The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
Latest Article

The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
More Recent Articles
Contrast Training for Size
By: Lee Boyce
An Interview with Marianne Kane of Girls Gone Strong
By: Jordan Syatt
What Supplements Should I be Taking? By: Jay Wainwright
Bench Like a Girl By: Julia Ladewski
Some Thoughts on Building a Big Pull By: Christopher Mason

Facebook Join Facebook Group       Twitter Follow on Twitter       rss Subscribe via RSS

View Poll Results: Belts...use em or lose em?

Voters
60. You may not vote on this poll
  • I always use a weight belt.

    2 3.33%
  • I never use a weight belt.

    40 66.67%
  • I use a weight belt on deadlifts, squats, etc.

    18 30.00%
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 38 of 38

Thread: Belt or No Belt

  1. #26
    Senior Member Craig James's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    797
    I am curious: What do you all think a weight belt really does for you?

  2. #27
    Pretty Fly for an Old Guy W8_4_Me's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    1,117
    Support. Reduced spinal compression with HEAVY exercises.

    That's why large retailers like Home Depot went to a policy where everyone wears a belt.

    Here's a link I found, too.

    http://www.wsu.edu/~strength/belts.htm

    I will always wear a belt to squat. Always.

  3. #28
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Posts
    5,323
    Lander et al (1) examined the effects of the use of weight belts on spinal compression and muscle activity during the squat exercise. Six experienced male trainees were examined; all subjects could squat 1.5 to 2.38 times their body weight in a squat exercise. Three conditions were examined: no weight belts, a light weight belt 7 mm thick and 10 mm wide in the center, and a heavy belt 11 mm thick and 100 mm wide along the entire belt. The experimenters also examined three loading conditions: 70%, 80%, and 90% 1 RM. All performances were filmed and digitized. Vertical, anteroposterior, and mediolateral forces were measured using a Kistler force platform. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) was measured using a ballloon catheter inserted in each subject's rectum. EMG signals from the rectus abdominus, the external obliques, and the erector spinae were measured.

    Kinematic data was generated from the digitized film. The lift was divided into 6 phases; the downward phase of the squat was P1-P3, and the upward phase was P4-P6. Joint moments were calculated using data from the force platform and from position data from the digitized film. Forces acting upon the spine were also calculated.

    FINDINGS: The most significant differences between trials were found when using weights at 90% 1 RM, so the authors only presented the results of this condition. When using a weight belt, the anteroposterior center of pressure was located farther forward than when not using a weight belt. IAP was highest during P4 (P4 was the initial upward movement as soon as the bottom position was reached) and was also highest when using a weight belt. Maximum values for joint moments occurred during P4; joint moment data also suggested that subjects using a weight belt relied more upon the trunk muscles to raise the weight than individuals not using a weight belt, since knee moments were higher when individuals did not use a belt. Spinal compression was highest during P4, and was 2.8-6.2% lower in the weight belt conditions as compared to no weight belt. Mean back muscle forces were 2.6-5.0% greater without a weight belt. mEMG values for the no weight belt condition were greater than the two weight belt conditions (8.3-23.5% greater for the rectus abdominus, 13.4-44.2% greater for the external oblique, and 11.6-22.9% greater for the erector spinae).



    IMPLICATIONS: The increase in IAP provided by a weight belt may help prevent injury by reducing compression forces acting upon the spine and reducing back muscle forces.

    *** Note the key word "MAY" as there is not enough hard evidence to prove whether a belt is a sure fire way of reducing spinal compression. I would tend towards making sure a individual has a proper functioning core area first before slapping a belt on them.


    However, muscle activity of the trunk appears to be significantly reduced when using a weight belt, so the trunk may not receive as good of a training stimulus as it would if no belt was worn.

    *** This backs up the point that it may not be a wise decision always to strap a belt on.

    Since the authors found the most significant differences during the heaviest trial, it may be prudent to not wear a weight belt during lighter sets to that the trunk musculature may receive a training stimulus. A weight belt can then be worn for heavier sets (>80% 1 RM) to help increase IAP and reduce spinal compression forces. More research is warranted on what would be optimal times to use a belt and what would not.
    Maki Fit Blog

    At Large: Optimize Your Body | Dynamic Conditioning |
    My articles on Wannabebig

    "Soli Deo Gloria"
    "Test all things; hold fast what is good.": 1 Thessalonians 5:21

    "I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do. And if I do what I do not want to do, I agree that the law is good. As it is, it is no longer I myself who do it, but it is sin living in me. I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For what I do is not the good I want to do; no, the evil I do not want to do--this I keep on doing. Now if I do what I do not want to do, it is no longer I who do it, but it is sin living in me that does it.
    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
    Romans 7:14-25

    "Judo is not about strength. Yet in the learning curve, all Judokas get strong. Only with time do you learn where to apply that strength."
    The Art of Judo

  4. #29
    Pretty Fly for an Old Guy W8_4_Me's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    1,117
    There's no reason to argue this point. A weight belt is a safety feature. That's all. If you don't like 'em, don't use 'em!

    It's as simple as that!

  5. #30
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Posts
    5,323
    I'm not arguing, I'm just pointing out some things.
    Maki Fit Blog

    At Large: Optimize Your Body | Dynamic Conditioning |
    My articles on Wannabebig

    "Soli Deo Gloria"
    "Test all things; hold fast what is good.": 1 Thessalonians 5:21

    "I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do. And if I do what I do not want to do, I agree that the law is good. As it is, it is no longer I myself who do it, but it is sin living in me. I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For what I do is not the good I want to do; no, the evil I do not want to do--this I keep on doing. Now if I do what I do not want to do, it is no longer I who do it, but it is sin living in me that does it.
    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
    Romans 7:14-25

    "Judo is not about strength. Yet in the learning curve, all Judokas get strong. Only with time do you learn where to apply that strength."
    The Art of Judo

  6. #31
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD, USA
    Posts
    8,668
    "Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) was measured using a ballloon catheter inserted in each subject's rectum."

    Um, how do you get people to volunteer for this?

    Good points, Maki.

  7. #32
    Pretty Fly for an Old Guy W8_4_Me's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    1,117
    I'd never volunteer... in fact, they'd have to pay me pretty well!

    If ya can't see how a weight belt would be of benefit... well, that's the way it goes.

  8. #33
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Posts
    5,323
    Originally posted by W8_4_Me

    If ya can't see how a weight belt would be of benefit... well, that's the way it goes.

    *** Because I don't use one doesn't mean I condone the use of one. I am merely stating that people should step back and examine whether they really need to use one all the time or when they do use it, is it really nessacary at that particular time?
    Maki Fit Blog

    At Large: Optimize Your Body | Dynamic Conditioning |
    My articles on Wannabebig

    "Soli Deo Gloria"
    "Test all things; hold fast what is good.": 1 Thessalonians 5:21

    "I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do. And if I do what I do not want to do, I agree that the law is good. As it is, it is no longer I myself who do it, but it is sin living in me. I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For what I do is not the good I want to do; no, the evil I do not want to do--this I keep on doing. Now if I do what I do not want to do, it is no longer I who do it, but it is sin living in me that does it.
    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
    Romans 7:14-25

    "Judo is not about strength. Yet in the learning curve, all Judokas get strong. Only with time do you learn where to apply that strength."
    The Art of Judo

  9. #34
    Pretty Fly for an Old Guy W8_4_Me's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    1,117
    I hear ya.

    You're probably right.

  10. #35
    Proud Father Maki Riddington's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Posts
    5,323
    If you felt like I was trying to come across like I was right and you were wrong then I should have maybe explained myself a little better
    Maki Fit Blog

    At Large: Optimize Your Body | Dynamic Conditioning |
    My articles on Wannabebig

    "Soli Deo Gloria"
    "Test all things; hold fast what is good.": 1 Thessalonians 5:21

    "I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do. And if I do what I do not want to do, I agree that the law is good. As it is, it is no longer I myself who do it, but it is sin living in me. I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For what I do is not the good I want to do; no, the evil I do not want to do--this I keep on doing. Now if I do what I do not want to do, it is no longer I who do it, but it is sin living in me that does it.
    So I find this law at work: When I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God's law; but I see another law at work in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within my members. What a wretched man I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? Thanks be to God--through Jesus Christ our Lord!"
    Romans 7:14-25

    "Judo is not about strength. Yet in the learning curve, all Judokas get strong. Only with time do you learn where to apply that strength."
    The Art of Judo

  11. #36
    Senior Member Craig James's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    797
    Thanks for the response, fellas. I have just been curious as to the efficacy of using belts or even knee wraps. I have read about wearing compression shorts or pants to increase jumping and running ability, and I can see how this could help with squats when you wrap the knees. But my big question has just been whether or not the world has been duped by belt manufactures into believing that people need belts to protect their backs. I have personally had bad lower back problems in the past, and I believe that having well developed abs, well stretched hamstrings, and a proper lifting form will protect someone far more than a piece of leather or nylon wrapped around your middle.

    But, W8_4_Me, I donít use much in the way of heavy weight yet, eitherÖ

    Thanks for the info, Maki.

  12. #37
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD, USA
    Posts
    8,668
    Originally posted by Craig James
    I have personally had bad lower back problems in the past, and I believe that having well developed abs, well stretched hamstrings, and a proper lifting form will protect someone far more than a piece of leather or nylon wrapped around your middle.

    Absolutely.

  13. #38
    Senior Member hemants's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    1,569
    I never used a belt as long as I had access to a cable row machine.

    Now that I am in a home with a power rack and bench (but no cables), I could see the benefit of using a belt specifically for bent over rows.

    My lower back get's enough workout doing squats/deads and adding bent over barbell rows to my routine would just not be as effective without a belt as my lower back would certainly fail before anything else.

    In general, however, I would say that overuse of a belt is worse than no use at all for the same reason that isolation lifts are not as effective as compound lifts.

    Having a stong trunk is as important as anything else; if that means my legs must wait until my lower back muscles catch up, then so be it.
    Last edited by hemants; 08-15-2001 at 12:46 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •