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  1. #1
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    DC Method

    Has anyone tried the DC Method? I've been looking over it and it looks like one of the best size routines I've seen. It's promoted by a guy who goes by the online name of "DoggCrapp", who is a 300 lb monster (granted he's on juice). I read a bit of what he's said, and he's helped several natural trainees (that did not just start lifting) put on 30lbs of muscle in a year.

    Here's a rough overview of his routine (I'll include a sample):
    Pick 2 compound exercises (that are going to be easy to go to failure on) for the following bodyparts:

    Day 1
    Chest
    shoulders
    triceps
    back width (Wide grip chins, pull-downs, etc)
    back thickness (rows, deads, stuff that adds mass)

    Day 2
    biceps
    forearms
    calves
    hams
    quads

    You'll be doing 1 (ONLY ONE) work set for each of the muscles above (you still do warm-ups and everything).

    After you finish the warm-up, you do that one set to complete and absolute failure (try to aim for the 7-10 rep range). After that, you rest for about 15-20 seconds and then go again to complete failure. Rest another 20 seconds and go again. At the end of that lift, have the spotter lift the bar up and then you lower it to the sticky point in your lift (on some lifts you may choose not to do this, but it's generally reccomended) and hold it there for as long as you can. Have the spotter lift the bar back up, and then do a really slow negative.

    Note: On all work sets, you should have as explosive a concentric movement and as slow a eccentric movement as possible (aim for 4-8 seconds when you lower it, but you don't need a stopwatch or anything).

    Now, you do "extreme stretching" (I'll explain this better below).

    After that, you're done with that bodypart and you move on to the next. Be sure to cool down and stretch again (just normal stretch) at the end of the workout.

    Try to incorporate some active recovery as best you can so that you have as short rests between workouts as possible.

    The average person would do:
    Monday - Day I (First exercises)
    Wednesday - Day II (First exercises)
    Friday - Day I (Second exercises)
    Monday - Day II (Second exercises)
    Wednesday - Day I (First exercises)
    etc...so 1 1/2x per week you'd be working the same muscle group. If you think you have above average recovery ability, then you might want to consider going 2x/week or close to it.

    Ok, so here's a sample routine and DC's explanation of the way to do all the extreme stretches:

    Day I:
    Low Incline Bench Press – 1 x 7
    Seated Military Press – 1 x 8
    Tricep Push-Downs – 1 x 9
    Wide-Grip Rear Pulldowns – 1 x 8
    Dead Lifts – 1 x 8


    Day II:
    Machine Curls – 1 x 14
    Hammer Curls – 1 x 14
    Hack Squat-Style Calve-Raises – 1 x 8
    Hamstring Curls – 1 x 8
    Squats – 1 x 8

    Day III:
    Crossovers – 1 x 8
    Upright Rows – 1 x 10
    BW Dips - 1 x as many as possible (And still do rest pauses at the end)
    BW Wide Grip Chin-ups -1 x as many as possible (And still do rest pauses at the end)
    Bent Rows – 1 x 8


    Day IV:
    BB Curls – 1 x 14
    Wrist Curls – 1 x 14
    Standing Calf Raises – 1 x 12
    SLDL – 1 x 8
    Leg Extensions – 1 x 14

    Notes:
    Calves are to be done in a different style than the other exercises. Perform a fairly explosive concentric, followed by a 5 second concentric, and then a 15 second stretch at the very bottom (still do rest pauses and finish with a static hold/negative).

    Extreme Stretches:
    Chest
    Flat bench 90lb dumbbells chest high--lungs full of air--first 10 seconds drop down into deepest stretch and then next 50 seconds really push the stretch (this really, really hurts) but do it faithfully and come back and post on the AE message board in 4 weeks and tell me if your chest isn't much fuller and rounder

    Triceps
    Seated on a flat bench-my back up against the barbell---75lb dumbbell in my hand behind my head (like in an overhead dumbbell extension)--sink dumbbell down into position for the first 10 seconds and then an agonizing 50 seconds slightly leaning back and pushing the dumbbell down with the back of my head

    Shoulders
    This one is tough to describe--put barbell in squat rack shoulder height--face away from it and reach back and grab it palms up (hands on bottom of bar)---walk yourself outward until you are on your heels and the stretch gets painful--then roll your shoulders downward and hold for 60 seconds

    Biceps
    Just like the above position but hold barbell palms down now (hands on top of bar)--sink down in a squatting position first and if you can hack it into a kneeling position and then if you can hack that sink your butt down--60 seconds--I cannot make it 60 seconds-- I get to about 45—it’s too painful--if you can make it 60 seconds you are either inhuman or you need to raise the bar up another rung

    Back
    Honestly for about 3 years my training partner and I would hang a 100lb dumbbell from our waist and hung on the widest chinup bar (with wrist straps) to see who could get closest to 3 minutes--I never made it--I think 2 minutes 27 seconds was my record--but my back width is by far my best body part--I pull on a doorknob or stationary equipment with a rounded back now and it’s way too hard too explain here--just try it and get your feel for it

    Hamstrings
    Either leg up on a high barbell holding my toe and trying to force my leg straight with my free hand for an excruciating painful 60 seconds

    Quads
    Facing a barbell in a power rack about hip high --grip it and simultaneously sink down and throw your knees under the barbell and do a sissy squat underneath it while going up on your toes. Then straighten your arms and lean as far back as you can---60 seconds and if this one doesn't make you hate my guts and bring tears to your eyes nothing will---do this one faithfully and tell me in 4 weeks if your quads don’t look a lot different than they used to
    Dieting:
    He's really big on following his plans on diet. I'm not going to get into the science (though in his posts he did), but he basically suggested:
    1. Eat ~2x BW (lbs / g) in protien each day
    2. Trace carbs past around 6-7 pm
    3. Take in your EFAs (he suggests extra virgin olive oil because it's cheap)


    For those of you wondering WHY it works (in simple terms):
    The idea of the program is to progress in the 7-10 range (ideal for maximal hypertrophy) every workout. Many progression workouts ask you to start with submaximal loads, but DC's method uses your absolute maximum capacity, making sure to fully work the muscle. By using the slow negatives, static holds, etc. you can gain enough strength to progress every workout. Thanks to the extreme stretches and active recovery, you're able to workout sooner than you would otherwise be able to, thus allowing you to grow more often than the usual once/week style routine. DC's is the only routine that I've come across that has allowed people to say in the 5-10 range, work to failure, and be able to progress more than once/week.

    The extreme stretching is an absolute must, and will help you grow (he backed this claim up with hyperplasia and the fact that with all the people he's trained it's worked wonders).

    One more thing ... unless you are in excellent shape, it's probably a good idea to take 1-2 weeks off from failure after 4-6 weeks of this program. This will allow your muscles to recover and allow you to keep gaining strength and size for the next 4-6 weeks.

    Other bonuses: even though this is aimed towards size, it will increase your strength and flexibility a lot more than most size-based programs. It's also a pretty painful routine, which will help you deal with pain and all ..

    I generally aim to train sort of like a strongman, but I came across this and thought you guys might be interested (and it looks so close to perfect that I would be interested in seeing more people's results with it).

    If you have any questions I'll try to answer them ..
    Last edited by KingJustin; 06-19-2003 at 06:29 PM.

  2. #2
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
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    If you do what I tell you, you can gain 30 pounds in a year, too.

    I would never stretch like that.

    The workout is no worse than others I've seen, but probably not any better. As long as you progress, you'll succeed.
    Squats work better than supplements.
    "You know, if I thought like that, I'd never put more than one plate on the bar for anything, I'd never use bands or chains, I'd never squat to parallel or below, and I'd never let out the slightest grunt when I lift. At some point in your lifting career (assuming you're planning on getting reasonably strong and big), you're going to have to accept that most people think you are some kind of freak." -Sensei
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  3. #3
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    I sort of expected you or Chris to dislike this routine

    Anyways, what faults do you see in the program? I've read over most of the arguments against it, and when Doggcrapp is able to defend his routine, the other side tends to agee with him in the end. I have also heard of a lot of success with next to no failure with this routine.

  4. #4
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
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    Faults?

    I think traiing to failure over and over again is overrated, although I do think he does a good job trying to avert the issue by changing lifts. The problem with that is tracking progress.

    Like i said, the workout routine (minus the strethcing) is probably fine. No better, no worse than lots of others.

    I would never suggest anyone stretch as he suggests. The idea that pain = effective underlying this program is a bit troublesome.

    In general, some of these suggestions look to me like asking to get hurt.

    And, as with most programs, the diet is what really puts the weight on you. You could do HST and use his diet suggestion and gain just as much weight.
    Squats work better than supplements.
    "You know, if I thought like that, I'd never put more than one plate on the bar for anything, I'd never use bands or chains, I'd never squat to parallel or below, and I'd never let out the slightest grunt when I lift. At some point in your lifting career (assuming you're planning on getting reasonably strong and big), you're going to have to accept that most people think you are some kind of freak." -Sensei
    "You're wrong, and I have a completely irrelevant pubmed abstract that may or may not say so." - Belial
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  5. #5
    The Truth
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    I like his stretching ideas.. I do something similar, fascial stretching.

  6. #6
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    "I think traiing to failure over and over again is overrated, although I do think he does a good job trying to avert the issue by changing lifts."

    Well, generally there are two problems with training to failure:
    1. Failure to quickly recover
    2. Failure to be able to progress each training session
    But with this program he allows you to train to failure and still recover in time to train 50% more than most BB programs AND thanks to strength increases (from training to failure), you are able to continue and still progress.

    I think that the reason that HST isn't quite as effective as it seems it should be is because you are training with submaximal loads 5/6 of the time and you aren't staying in the 5-10 range the whole time.


    "The problem with that is tracking progress." (In reference to the 2 exercises per body part)

    I disagree. You can still track progress because you are staying with the routine for a long period of time, and only 2 different lifts for each muscle are being used over that time period.


    "I would never suggest anyone stretch as he suggests. The idea that pain = effective underlying this program is a bit troublesome."

    Well, it's not that more pain = more gain, it just comes as a by product. He swears by this stretching, and I've tried it a little bit for my chest (even though I don't use his routine) and, though I can't be POSITIVE that it's the stretching, I can see an improvement in my chest for sure. Like I said, everybody that has tried it has had great results. It's something about hyperplasia, I don't know enough of the exact science, but extreme style stretching was originally tested on birds, rats and a couple other animals with an increase in muscle. The results are apparently exactly as Doggcrapp predicted they would be based on how it affected the other animals.

    Finally, nobody has claimed to be injured due to these stretches.


    "And, as with most programs, the diet is what really puts the weight on you. You could do HST and use his diet suggestion and gain just as much weight."

    Well, yes, diet is probably one of the most important parts of any routine. Still, the more effective a routine is at stimulating hypertrophy, the more you are going to get out of your diet. I have difficulty believing that all decent routines are equal when you diet the same way. Many have also compared the DC Method to "HST on speed".

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    problems with DC's methods

    i actually like doggcrapp's ideas, sort of, but i have some problems with his suggestions

    firstly, training to failure is astonishingly overrated. i think people would have more success on that routine by trying to stay submaximal and actually adding volume per exercise.

    secondly, switching around exercises introduces a number of strange variables into the mix of determining what will and will not cause hypertrophy. over time, if progressive load is met (and depending on how 'trained' one's muscle tissue is), appreciable hypertrophy should be accomplished (following proper diet etc of course). training frequently (ie distributing load to more frequent sessions) is generally a good idea, but depending on how one goes about performing the DC routine, they may wind up with loads lighter than what they started for in a block of 3 exercises. ie going from bench the first time to incline bench the second to flyes the third or something. in terms of something like pec major, you're probably applying a decreasing amount of tension over that period (how long again? 8, 9 days?). the trend over time is still an increase in everything, but he's sort of helped confound the logic with the slightly nonsensical idea that exercise variation carries some novel use in gaining hypertrophy and avoiding injury.

    so yah, i don't really understand why one wouldn't just train with LESS variation and more incremental load akin to HST. i may be biased, but HST seems more like actual logic whereas DC's routine carries a lot of the burdens of 'bodybuilding logic.' did anyone else see that test america's iq program on fox? the fact that the bodybuilders tied the blondes for the 'lowest' average iq was almost too funny for me...

  8. #8
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    firstly, training to failure is astonishingly overrated. i think people would have more success on that routine by trying to stay submaximal and actually adding volume per exercise.
    Well, if you take a look at someone who has at least average recovery ability and has been training for a decent period of time on HST vs on the DC method, the DC method seems to blow away HST (which I do think is better than most programs because of the frequency). Even Brian Haycock agrees that DC's method will add a good bit of strength thanks to training to failure, rest pauses, static holds, slow negatives, etc. Thanks to all this strength specific training, one is able to progress every workout. The volume isn't needed because you are completely working the muscle (which is the cause of the strength increases). Without all this training to failure you would have to completely ditch the routine.


    secondly, switching around exercises introduces a number of strange variables into the mix of determining what will and will not cause hypertrophy. over time, if progressive load is met (and depending on how 'trained' one's muscle tissue is), appreciable hypertrophy should be accomplished (following proper diet etc of course). training frequently (ie distributing load to more frequent sessions) is generally a good idea, but depending on how one goes about performing the DC routine, they may wind up with loads lighter than what they started for in a block of 3 exercises. ie going from bench the first time to incline bench the second to flyes the third or something. in terms of something like pec major, you're probably applying a decreasing amount of tension over that period (how long again? 8, 9 days?). the trend over time is still an increase in everything
    Let me quote Brian Haycock on this:

    Zig-zagging is fine as long as the general trend over time is upwards. If not, the conditioning of the muscle (which is to say, the resistance of the tissue to the mechanical strain of a given weight load) will catch up with you, and your growth will plateau. Growth with a given load will probably only produce gains for about 4-6 weeks. The lighter the load, the shorter the amount of time it will be able to induce muscle growth.

    You can go about 7-14 days before you begin to lose some of the adaptation to previous higher loads. So one week will not cause you to lose ground. But by the end of two weeks with lighter loads, your muscles will begin to adapt to those lighter loads.
    Source: http://www.hypertrophy-specific.com/...t=ST;f=13;t=18

    Also, recently DC seems to be hinting more on just 2 different exercises, rather than 3. I think it makes more sense as well.


    he's sort of helped confound the logic with the slightly nonsensical idea that exercise variation carries some novel use in gaining hypertrophy and avoiding injury.
    Well, it's to avoid injury, aid recovery, and save your CNS. This simply means you can work out with higher loads more constantly.

  9. #9
    Rory Parker Behemoth's Avatar
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    Chest Flat bench 90lb dumbbells chest high--lungs full of air--first 10 seconds drop down into deepest stretch and then next 50 seconds really push the stretch (this really, really hurts) but do it faithfully and come back and post on the AE message board in 4 weeks and tell me if your chest isn't much fuller and rounder
    Hmm, his stretching ideas are interesting and while I don't really follow how he believes it works. I also don't see how it could hurt. I'd be interested to try them on one part and see if there is even the slightest improvement.

    So for the chest, I can't even dumbell press 90's. Right now I'm working with 75's for 6-8 reps. What weight should I use to perform the stretch? And also, do I do this one time, or after every set?

  10. #10
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    Well, on DC's routine you use only 1 set, so you would do it after that. When I do mine, I do it at the end of my chest movement.

    Also, I don't think you press the DBs (granted DC is even less articulate than me). You sorta get into a mix between a real wide grip DB press and flye "stance" and then let them sink lower. It really hurts like hell, but in the time I've been dong them, I think there has been a decent improvement in my chest. It's not exactly the same improvement as you would regularly get from gaining size, and it's too hard to explain...
    Last edited by KingJustin; 06-16-2003 at 09:20 PM.

  11. #11
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    Well, if you take a look at someone who has at least average recovery ability and has been training for a decent period of time on HST vs on the DC method, the DC method seems to blow away HST (which I do think is better than most programs because of the frequency).

    just out of curiosity, how are you coming to this conclusion? self-reported anecdote? i would say this isn't a very reliable way of determining which is 'better.'

    Even Brian Haycock agrees that DC's method will add a good bit of strength thanks to training to failure, rest pauses, static holds, slow negatives, etc.

    i think you're exaggerating the specific praise bryan gave. he commended DC for recommending training more in accords with the logic of hypertrophy, but he also referred to it as being 'strength-based,' in which case he's questioning it being hypertrophy-specific.

    Thanks to all this strength specific training, one is able to progress every workout.

    progress in what manner? i agree he has good anecdotal reporting, but i still find this an unreliable way of discerning just how effective his protocol is.

    The volume isn't needed because you are completely working the muscle (which is the cause of the strength increases). Without all this training to failure you would have to completely ditch the routine.

    why would you have to ditch the routine? what about training to failure 'completely works the muscle?' how are we guaranteed that any given set has maximally exposed ALL fibers to the proper hypertrophic stimulus? i find no evidence of this reasoning in any of the literature i'm aware of.

    Well, it's to avoid injury, aid recovery, and save your CNS. This simply means you can work out with higher loads more constantly.

    I find no evidence for any of these claims. What evidence exists to suggest it avoids injury? What evidence exists that it 'aids recovery' (and what do you even mean by this, the recovery of what?) Also, how is it saving the CNS? The only way to assure the loads are even being applied equally to the muscles in question is to compare the same exercise. Exercises involving variation in these factors does not assure we ARE applying maximal tension to the muscle groups in question. As I indicated previously, if you move from an exercise that provides a given muscle more tension to an exercise that provides it less tension, even if you were able to train to failure in both, how would this assure that we can 'work out with higher loads more constantly.' the exercise variation itself may vary wel PREVENT us from working out with higher loads more constantly.

  12. #12
    Rory Parker Behemoth's Avatar
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    Bizatch, would I do the stretch with the weight I'm using? For instance, say I do 75x8, 75x8, 75x6 - into stretch?

    Also, let me get this straight how he says to do it. On your last press, hold the weight at the top for 10 seconds. Then bring it down (I understand the position, very were it would really stretch) and hold it there for 50 seconds?

    My routine is 3 sets of DB presses, 3 sets of cable crossover. I do DB presses first. It doesn't matter that my stretch is in between chest exercises does it?
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  13. #13
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    "just out of curiosity, how are you coming to this conclusion? self-reported anecdote? i would say this isn't a very reliable way of determining which is 'better.'"

    Well, this wasn't clinically tested or anything like that. From the reports of people who have tried both, even people that really liked HST, DC seems to have been more favored because of better results in both size and strength.



    "progress in what manner?"

    Progress as in adding weight to your lifts every week AND STILL lifting in the 5-10 range every workout.



    "I find no evidence for any of these claims. What evidence exists to suggest it avoids injury?"

    I'll try and find the exact studies, but for what it's worth, Westside also switches exercises to "save" your CNS.


    "why would you have to ditch the routine? what about training to failure 'completely works the muscle?' how are we guaranteed that any given set has maximally exposed ALL fibers to the proper hypertrophic stimulus? i find no evidence of this reasoning in any of the literature i'm aware of."

    Do you mean all types of fibers (slow, fast)? Also, studies have shown that 1 or 2 sets will be very close to as effective as 5 or so.



    "Exercises involving variation in these factors does not assure we ARE applying maximal tension to the muscle groups in question."

    Yes, it may be applying less tension, but you'll be doing the exercise that applies more tension ~4 days later, so it doesn't matter.

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    Well, this wasn't clinically tested or anything like that. From the reports of people who have tried both, even people that really liked HST, DC seems to have been more favored because of better results in both size and strength.

    my only problem with this is that it's been reported at forums that DC either runs or knows the owner. have you been to a weider-supporting board before? it's scary stuff.

    Progress as in adding weight to your lifts every week AND STILL lifting in the 5-10 range every workout.

    this would indeed be impressive.

    I'll try and find the exact studies, but for what it's worth, Westside also switches exercises to "save" your CNS.

    I think it's a little more complicated than that, and derives from Conjugate methods from eastern training science.


    Do you mean all types of fibers (slow, fast)? Also, studies have shown that 1 or 2 sets will be very close to as effective as 5 or so.

    On an acute basis, this depends. The ACSM tried to find ALL relevent studies pertaining to this matter (and the number was something like 140...which is a lot), and concluded that advanced trainees tended to gain more strength and hypertrophy from higher volume sessions, whereas novices gain 'just as well' from 1 all out set.

    Yes, it may be applying less tension, but you'll be doing the exercise that applies more tension ~4 days later, so it doesn't matter.

    Well, it certainly SORT of matters, as you're spending that number of days NOT growing. In the grand scheme, you're still growing, my point is that it seems you might not be growing as fast as possible due to poor choices of which exercises to rotate.

    Also, as a sidenote, if you're really interested, I'm pretty sure I could devise a higher volume program based on HST for those 'advanced' (you know, drugs included) trainees who want a more 'hardcore' routine. I'm guessing it'd stack favorably against DC's default recommendations...
    Last edited by blowdpanis; 06-17-2003 at 04:55 PM.

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    I think doing one set to failure might not be enough for newbies and marginally beneficial to advanced bodybuilders. You need to be really able to focus to use routines like this. I tend to like 2 or 3 sets per movement depending on how I feel after the 2nd.

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    I think that the training principles behind DoggCrapp's methods are great!

    Here is why I like it:

    1 - Body gets worked more than once per week. Makes you feel fuller.

    2 - Training to failure is something I like, regardless of whether it is not the optimum solution for gaining muscle. I ENJOY pushing myself, and feel great when I do so.

    3 - The high protein does work for me. I dont really give a crap about this study, or that study...high protein works for me. How do I know? When I dropped my protein, while upping carbs I started losing LBM (as per caliper tests done weekly). Nothing else in my training changed.

    4 - The stretching, while very painfull, seems to help with growth. Mostly in my quads (adding some seperation), biceps, and chest.

    5 - Rotating exercises. Love this. Helps with motivation and allows for variety.

    6 - Rest pauses. The first portion of your set is done for say 7-9 reps, then you wait the 30seconds and crank out some more, and then wait, and some more reps. I find that my ability to pound these sets is great, as opposed to doing say a 5x5 workout. Some exercises dont work very well with the RP. For instance, the triceps extension...Instead I either do straight sets, or drop sets. The rp seems to kill my elbows somewhat.

    Anyways, DC (Dante) does know how to put pounds of LBM on people. The proof is in the pudding, he is a monster! Like anything else though you can poke holes in any training scheme. There is not a BEST method for anyone really.

    Just try it. I have attached an xls sheet that someone made on a different board. It lays out this person's workout.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  17. #17
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    my only problem with this is that it's been reported at forums that DC either runs or knows the owner. have you been to a weider-supporting board before? it's scary stuff.

    I don't want to plug the forum, but the first place I saw this at was at a forum that Doggcrapp didn't moderate or anything. Someone else posted his routine, people thought it seemed off, then Doggcrapp was e-mailed and he explained everything. People started trying it and really had success.


    On an acute basis, this depends. The ACSM tried to find ALL relevent studies pertaining to this matter (and the number was something like 140...which is a lot), and concluded that advanced trainees tended to gain more strength and hypertrophy from higher volume sessions, whereas novices gain 'just as well' from 1 all out set.

    Well, this also isn't just one set to failure. It's sort of like 3. I'd challenge some of the people who do higher volumes to try doing one set to complete, grueling failure and push the last rep that they don't even think they can get. After that, rest around 20 seconds and then do it again, and then again. THEN you do a static hold and finally end with a negative.


    Well, it certainly SORT of matters, as you're spending that number of days NOT growing. In the grand scheme, you're still growing, my point is that it seems you might not be growing as fast as possible due to poor choices of which exercises to rotate.

    Well, again, I'll let you argue with Brian Haycock:
    I have yet to see a difference in gains from those allowing zigzagging of their weights, and those who don't.

    Also, as a sidenote, if you're really interested, I'm pretty sure I could devise a higher volume program based on HST for those 'advanced' (you know, drugs included) trainees who want a more 'hardcore' routine. I'm guessing it'd stack favorably against DC's default recommendations...

    Well, it may also work very well, but it's a completely different kind of program that uses completely different principles. I do think HST is a good program, but you are able to progress because you work up to your max, whereas with the DC method you are starting with your max, getting stronger, and then progressing.



    Behemoth, sorry, I missed that post earlier.
    If you just wanted to add in the stretches to your workout it will still help. Finish the last set of chest work that you would do. After you're done you can take a second to rest. Then, take those 75lb DBs (or heavier if you're not getting a good enough stretch) and go into flye position but really stretch it for as close to 60 seconds as possible.


    Using his method, here's how the whole exercise goes..say you're doing incline barbell presses (he reccomends you use barbells and not dumbells on most exercises because you can go to complete failure with barbells since you don't have to stabilize):
    Warm-ups (maybe 2-3 light, progressive sets)
    200 x 8 to cmplete failure
    Rest ~20 seconds
    200 x 3 failure
    Rest ~20 seconds
    200 x 2 failure
    and then after that, have the spotter pick up the weight and let it descend down to the part in your incline bench that you have the hardest time with and hold it there for as long as you possibly can.
    Then, have the spotter pick it up again and do another slow negative.

    Now, go find 2 heavy DBs and put them in like the bottom portion of a flye, and then really, really stretch it out. Hold it there for as close to 60 seconds as possible..it will hurt a lot.

    After that you're done with Chest and you move on to shoulders.
    Last edited by KingJustin; 06-18-2003 at 04:48 PM.

  18. #18
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    my only comment, bizatch, is that bryan's comment concerning zigzagging applied to the logic of one exercise bouncing around a bit from minicycle to minicycle (eg from 15s to 10s). however, this drop of load only occurs for a relatively short period of time anyways.

    bryan HAS mentioned that adaptation to load is dependent on A) overall increases and B) acute increaess, ie an increase from the previous session. the logic of this doesn't necessarily mesh with DC's recommendations.

    if you were to perform 3 different exercises, with a successive drop in load, you could literally be going 8 or 9 days between increments, which is a LOT different than what HST is recommending. you're taking his recommendations out of context

    even so, i think there are plausible ways to avoid this, probably, using DC's method.

    i admit, it's an interesting method, and i have considered giving it a full go...

  19. #19
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    You may be right on that point. Bryan says that failure to increase between 7-14 days would cause one to begin to lose some of the adaptation to previous higher loads, though he mentions that this time frame is "soft".

    It would be 9 days before you increased the tension (for 50% of the exercises), but at the same time you are going to failure on the same muscle in the middle of it. And, I would definately do only 1-2 different exercises for each muscle group (depending on how taxing they are), as opposed to 3.

    Perhaps a good solution to this would be to use two exercises that are going to put similar amounts of tension on the target muscle group and then on the exercise that is going to put less tension on the muscles, do lower reps/heavier weight...

    For example, let's say Wide grip BB bench puts slightly more tension on the chest than DB incline. You could do 6 reps to failure on incline and 10 reps to failure on wide grip BB bench.
    Last edited by KingJustin; 06-18-2003 at 06:57 PM.

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