The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
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    Connective Tissue Disease, etc.

    My mom has connective tissue disease (kinda like Lupis but not as bad and it doesn't deform joints)

    Anyways, I was tested for it (and it was negative) because I have a lot of joint pains just after playin a game of soccer or basketball or whatever (my knees mainly).

    I'm not even currently working out and I had these pains before I ever worked out. I was wondering if "normal" people have these kinda pains. It feels like when I bend my knees that the joints are rubbing against each other too hard, like a lot of pressure or somethin. But I only have these pains after doing an activity like this (working out doesn't even cause the pains).

    The doctor said it was growing pains, but it's REALLY painful and I think he thinks I'm sensitive to pain or somethin, but it isn't just growing pains I don't think (cause I've had them for several years and I'm 16 now).

    Oh well, just wondering if anyone knows anything about them. And one more thought, he recommended taking pain relievers (tylenol or ibuprofen) and anti-inflammatories, etc, But I don't want to "hide" the pain, I want to get rid of the CAUSE. Pain is telling your body that something is wrong and hiding the pain isn't going to fix the problem, only let you tolerate it.

    Thanks for reading this
    Last edited by jww13; 08-22-2001 at 09:00 PM.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Craig James's Avatar
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    jww13, below your kneecaps and on the tibia, do you have a bump that sticks out a little bit? Many young men have what is called (I am going to really mess this name up) Oshen Schlager, which is this small protrusion of the tibial tubricule where the patellar tendon connects into the tibia(shin bone). I have this in my right knee, though not my left. When growing up, I had a bit of pain in that knee when running and exercising, and had it examined, and was told about this funny bump. It is not a bad thing so far as I know; it may just lead to a little bit of pain while you are growing, kind of like growing pains I suppose. I still have the bump at 31 years of age, and it hasn't bothered me in many years.

    Just something to look at...
    Last edited by Craig James; 08-23-2001 at 12:07 AM.

  4. #3
    . Delphi's Avatar
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    * insert usual disclaimers here:
    1) Consult your doctor first efore embarking....,
    2) Not meant to be construed as medical advice,
    3) yada yada yada
    *

    Pretty open-ended on possibilities with the info you've given.

    If you're lanky and young (I think you're 18) some relief can sometimes be gained by stretching the quadriceps. Grab your left foot behind your butt with your right hand and pull the foot back, not up. This stretches the patellar ligament, which is really the quadriceps tendon. Some thin young people have Patellofemoral Syndrome, where the ligament/tendon is tight. This leads to the patella trying to track over the femoral condyles too far laterally. Even if you don't have PFS, a little stretching is a good thing.

    If your "knee pain" is actually on the tibial tuberosity (the bony knot beneath the patella on the tibia) you might have a partial avulsion of the tendinous insertion there. Won't go into the fancy name here. This occurs commonly in people who do considerable jumping, or running on hard surfaces. This one's not as easy to get over.

    The aspirin/Motrin strategy is more for the anti-inflammatory effect than the pain-relieving effect. You are right, however, in being concerned about masking the pain and inviting a chronic injury.

    These were just two conditions that popped into my head immediately. With what you've described the list of possibilities is very long. I strongly urge you to see a doctor who has an interest in sports-related medicine and get his/her advice.

  5. #4
    . Delphi's Avatar
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    Craig posted while I was beating the kids. What he's talking about is the 2nd possibility I mentioned. I believe the spelling is Osgood-Schlatter, but I may have the 2nd name spelled wrong. Craig, what did they have you do for it? Activity avoidance? That's the thing I remember from school. I don't treat this kind of thing in my practice, so you probably have more hands-on knowledge about it than me.

  6. #5
    Hardcore, what else?
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    I know exactly what you guys are talking about-- osgood schlaughters disease. (I think that's how it's spelled) They say if you can actually pronounce it, you have it. hehe I had it when I was about 13 and it really got irritated and hurt a lot when I played basketball. I saw the doc and he just said it happens quite a bit to young teens that are readily active in sports. It hurt so bad I couldn't walk right for a while. It was VERY sensitive too. So no running or basketball for me for a while. That bump, I was told, was just a little bit of abnormal growth. Nothin you can do about it, pain goes away after a while. So now I have a bump on my left knee(my jumping leg) but not on my right. No big deal now.
    Last edited by degsta; 08-22-2001 at 11:54 PM.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Craig James's Avatar
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    Thanks for helping me out with the name, DelphiDoc and Degsta, I have trouble remembering that strange name...

    DelphiDoc, as I recall, the physician who examined me said to just restrict activities when the pain arose. I 100% agree that a doc specializing in sports medicine should examine jww13, if one hasn't already.

  8. #7
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    DelphiDoc got the name right. This condition causes pain over the bump near the top of the front of the shin bone (tibial tubercle). A similar condition (Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease) causes pain at the bottom of the knee cap. If fairly mild, both conditions can be treated with ice after activity and occasional anti-inflammatory meds (such as ibuprofen) as needed. If you've had these pains for several years, they might well be due to something else. I would recommend getting checked out by an orthopedic surgeon. By the way, all that the diagnosis "growing pains" means is "I don't know what's wrong with you, but I don't think it's anything serious, and I think that it will eventually go away."

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