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Thread: What's your opinion on HIT

  1. #1
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    What's your opinion on HIT

    My trainer got me started on HIT about 2 years ago. Before that time I was in the gym 5 days a week doing all sorts of exercises and sets but not really getting anywhere. I started training with HIT and really liked it, started making some great gains. He started me off once every 7 days and compared my group with another control group that exercised traditionally 4 days per week. We made steady gains while the other group got did not (actually gained body fat), and were more prone to injuries and sickness. As I understand it, muscle fiber grows when it is stressed to failure, therefore you only need to lift to failure once in order to release the stimulus. Not only are multiple sets not needed but you may damage the tissue. You also need to allow the muscle to obtain adequate rest between workouts or you'll damage it further. For me it seems to be about 5 days. I go to the gym and make weight increases every time. Also, you need to time the exercise instead of counting reps. The time under load is what you want to measure, not reps. That's what I do. Any HIT guys out there wanna comment?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cackerot69's Avatar
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    "My trainer got me started on HIT about 2 years ago. Before that time I was in the gym 5 days a week doing all sorts of exercises and sets but not really getting anywhere. I started training with HIT and really liked it, started making some great gains."

    You were likely overtrained, thus lowering volume helped.

    "As I understand it, muscle fiber grows when it is stressed to failure, therefore you only need to lift to failure once in order to release the stimulus."

    This is incorrect, muscle fibers grow when they are stressed at a level beyond normal, i.e. overload or progression and you eat enough.

    "Not only are multiple sets not needed but you may damage the tissue."

    Well that's the idea. Damage tissue so additional tissue is added to protect against this damage in the future, muscle growth.

    "You also need to allow the muscle to obtain adequate rest between workouts or you'll damage it further."

    Yup. But, you can vary this period through intensity varation, load variation, rep range, etc etc....genetics play a role too.

    "For me it seems to be about 5 days. I go to the gym and make weight increases every time."

    Coo. When this stops working, what are you going to do? Just curious.

    "Also, you need to time the exercise instead of counting reps. The time under load is what you want to measure, not reps."

    They go hand in hand, set a rep cadence (tempo), and a number of reps and multiply these and you have your TUT. It's just easier to count reps.

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    Tomlifter,

    Are you doing one whole-body workout every 5 days? How many sets per bodypart? Are you still making consistent gains after 2 years? How about cardio?

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    Thanks for the reply. I'll take the info into consideration. What will I do when it doesn't work anymore? So far, that hasn't happened.

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    Yea Taras, it's been great. I have 4 workouts, 2 upper body and 2 lower body. They are performed alternately every 5 days. Unless I am not getting enough rest between workouts, I gain every time. When I don't gain, I rest more. You can see my training routine under Training, lifting routine by Tomlifter

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    Senior Member Cackerot69's Avatar
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    Have you tried anything else?

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    Yea, I lifted with a trainer before HIT and he had me in the gym 4 days a week doing all sorts of things. I would always plateau on an exercise and then start losing the ability to lift the weight. Overtrained!

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    Tomlifter,

    I should have read your other post first. Now I have some other questions. Why do the reps vary so much, e.g. 17 for squats and 5 for curls? Also, it seems like you're far stronger, relatively speaking, with regard to squats vs curls (380 lbs for 17 reps vs 105 for 4 reps). Could you be overtraining your biceps?

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    Yea, I suspect that I am overtraining the guns, but I have an obsession with getting them bigger. Guess I should lay off a while. As for the squats, it doesn't seem to matter how much weight I add, I can go for about 17 reps and that amount of time. My legs are probably the strongest body part for me. My deadlift is lagging, though. I'm having trouble keeping a good grip.

  10. #10
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    I still don't understand how you determine weight and reps, and how time factors into this. Also, if you want big arms, don't forget the triceps!

  11. #11
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    Taras, here is the way it was explained to me. I generally start with a weight that fails (I can't lift it anymore) at around 8 reps. I time the exercise with a stop watch. Time under load is more important than reps. Next time I do the exercise I up the weight and see what happens. Usually the time remains the same and I have increased the weight I can press. If the time decreases, then maybe I need to stay at the same weight next time until I see progress again. My squats (which are partials, by the way, I don't go all the way down to the floor, knee at 90 degrees) keep getting stronger with about the same time and weight increases. That's what I do.

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    Hmmm. Interesting.
    Has anyone else out there tried this approach?

  13. #13
    Senior Member Avatar's Avatar
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    screw the timing your sets crap. Do reps. Count reps. Progress each workout on reps. When reps hit 8 or whatever, then up weight. Thats overload. Its that simple.
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  14. #14
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    When you're measuring your TUL do you specify how much of the time is concentric (shortening) and how much is eccentric (lengthening)? As it's been explained to you by your trainer, does it matter if more time is spent in eccentric motion? I guess, taken to the most extreme, does this method advocate negative reps? I wonder if this theory felt that 30 seconds spent doing negatives would be better than 30 seconds doing a 2:2 or 2:4 ratio rep sequence.

    I do see the logic in Avatar's post. If you're lifting with a steady rhythm every time and using the same concentric:eccentric time ratio, I would think it would be easier to keep track of reps. I lift with the same ratio-timing sequence-whatever. I could go backwards and calculate the TUL if need be. I'd rather spend time do nothing but doing a lift and getting ready for the next one as soon as possible, rather than mssing with a stopwatch.


    BUT IF IT WORKS FOR YOU THAT'S WHAT MATTERS.

  15. #15
    Wannabebig Member Van Stretch's Avatar
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    Please be specific, how much weight have your put on since hit?, arm , chest measurement? BF alteration?
    Keep it simple

  16. #16
    Player Hater PowerManDL's Avatar
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    TUT is important-- but not important enough to bother counting. As has been said, if you keep a steady rhythm and do 8-12 reps, you'll be in the "hypertrophy zone."
    Vin Diesel has a fever.. and the only prescription is more cowbell.

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  17. #17
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    A lot of you have been questioning my keeping track of time under load instead of reps. I think that no matter how good you are counting your "cadence" during a rep, the time varies considerably. Even a several second gain or loss is significant when measuring progress. Unless you have a partner standing in the gym with you counting (as mine did for 2 years), a stopwatch is the best way of keeping track. It really isn't a bother and is easy to do. I have a wristwatch on my arm that is easy to see from all positions. I start the time and then get into position (usually lasting around 10 seconds). You do the exercise and then mark the time when its over. Subtract the time you spent getting into position and voila! NO BIG DEAL.

    As for my body transformation using HIT, unfortunately no beginning stats were kept. I took a body fat test that put me in the 21% range (ouch). This was taken after I had been training volume for 4 days per week. After the HIT test was over I had dropped to 15% bf in 8 weeks. Many have commented on my muscle tone since then, so I have greatly improved.

  18. #18
    Player Hater PowerManDL's Avatar
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    The time isn't really that important. As long as its between 30 and 70 seconds, you're getting the most of it. The exact time in that zone isn't what's critical. The measure of progression should be the weight (or muscular tension if you prefer), as that is really what causes the adaptation.
    Vin Diesel has a fever.. and the only prescription is more cowbell.

    Budiak: That girl I maced
    Budiak: macked
    Budiak: heh maced
    Budiak: I wish

    ShmrckPmp5: a good thing people can't fire guns through the computer...your ass would have been shot years ago

    Y2A 47: youre smooth as hell
    Y2A 47: thats why you get outta tickets, and into panties

    galileo: you're a fucking beast and I hate you
    galileo: hate

    assgrabbers are never subtile, they will grabb ass whereever they go,public or not, I know the type, because I am one. - Rock

  19. #19
    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
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    Tomlifter, I believe that lower volume and training to concentric failure (or beyond) is the way to go.

  20. #20
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    Chris,

    I agree dude!

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