Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Understanding HST

  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    35

    Understanding HST

    I'm thinking of giving up my normal 4-day split and trying HST for a few months. I'd like to test out this method for myself. I've been to the HST site and read all I could about it, but I was still at a loss for understanding. Thinking it would help I went through the archives and sorted through some old Q and A. To no avail I am still quite confused.

    I've spent quite a long time training to failure, if I understand it correctly HST doesn't necessarily promote absolute muscle failure.
    Is this true or false?

    I've noticed that I can only go about 60 to 70 minutes in a workout before getting too fatigued and /or hungry. Should an HST workout take about this amount of time? If not, how much more or less?

    The sample workouts shown on the HST page have two formats, the first format has the same exercises each day slowly progressing through resistance until your old max is reached on the final day of a cycle. The second format uses different lifts for each muslce group alternating for a total of three sessions each for every two week segment. Question is which is the real method? Are both accepted? Is the alternating plan used to alleviate monotony? Or did I read it wrong and one is an example of what not to do?

    Could someone who has used HST with success post a sample routine for me to study?

    Just out of curiosity-has anyone tried this just using machines? (I think it would be interesting to throw a newbie on something like that to see what would happen!)
    What caused you to do that?

  2. #2
    fat and small Blood&Iron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    On the Night Train
    Posts
    3,336

    Re: Understanding HST

    Originally posted by Sackattack

    I've spent quite a long time training to failure, if I understand it correctly HST doesn't necessarily promote absolute muscle failure.
    Is this true or false?
    Yeah, pretty much. You only go to failure at the end of each mini-cycle (but it's not mandatory even then), which for most folks ends up being every two weeks


    I've noticed that I can only go about 60 to 70 minutes in a workout before getting too fatigued and /or hungry. Should an HST workout take about this amount of time? If not, how much more or less?
    A 'typical' HST workout usually ends up being around 45min - 1 hour.


    The sample workouts shown on the HST page have two formats, the first format has the same exercises each day slowly progressing through resistance until your old max is reached on the final day of a cycle. The second format uses different lifts for each muslce group alternating for a total of three sessions each for every two week segment. Question is which is the real method? Are both accepted? Is the alternating plan used to alleviate monotony? Or did I read it wrong and one is an example of what not to do?
    The alternating method is mainly due to the fact that performing the same exercises with such frequency causes some folks joint pain. I do the same exercises at every session without problem (Only exception is squatting--and deadlifting depending on your form--which I think should be alternated with leg pressing to relieve some of the stress on your low back)

    Either method should work fine, though.


    Could someone who has used HST with success post a sample routine for me to study?
    Deadlifts
    Leg Curl
    Leg Extension
    H.S. Iso Row
    H.S. Incline Press
    Chins
    Dips
    DB Overhead Press
    Reverse Pec Deck
    Incline DB Curls
    Tricep Pushdowns
    Calf Raise
    Weighted Crunches

    Really the best source for info on HST is the HST forums(Particularly the FAQ section, which should answer almost any question you have) There are quite a few threads here as well, including journals from folks like myself. Do a search.

    We tend to think of Sisyphus as a tragic hero, condemned by the gods to shoulder his rock sweatily up the mountain, and again up the mountain, forever. The truth is that Sisyphus is in love with the rock. He cherishes every roughness and every ounce of it. He talks to it, sings to it. It has become the mysterious Other. He even dreams of it as he sleepwalks upward. Life is unimaginable without it, looming always above him like a huge gray moon. He doesn’t realize that at any moment he is permitted to step aside, let the rock hurtle to the bottom, and go home.

    Parables and Portraits, Stephen Mitchell

  3. #3
    Wannabebig Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    35
    Thanks Blood.

    Is each exercise for 2 sets? What it H.S.?

    Anyone else?
    What caused you to do that?

  4. #4
    fat and small Blood&Iron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    On the Night Train
    Posts
    3,336
    Originally posted by Sackattack
    Thanks Blood.

    Is each exercise for 2 sets? What it H.S.?

    Anyone else?
    I, like a lot of folks, tend to use a variable number of sets. At the beginning of each mini-cycle, when the weights are light I use 2-3 working sets. Then as I approach my maxes, I reduce it so I don't get too near failure. I also do more sets during the low-rep periods.

    Ex.
    Workout 1: 135 x 10, 135 x 10
    Workout 2: 145 x 10, 145 x 8
    Workout 3: 155 x 10, 155 x 5
    Workout 4: 165 x 10, 165 x 3
    Workout 5: 175 x 10
    Workout 6: 185 x 10

    H.S. = Hammer Strength (a brand of machine)

    We tend to think of Sisyphus as a tragic hero, condemned by the gods to shoulder his rock sweatily up the mountain, and again up the mountain, forever. The truth is that Sisyphus is in love with the rock. He cherishes every roughness and every ounce of it. He talks to it, sings to it. It has become the mysterious Other. He even dreams of it as he sleepwalks upward. Life is unimaginable without it, looming always above him like a huge gray moon. He doesn’t realize that at any moment he is permitted to step aside, let the rock hurtle to the bottom, and go home.

    Parables and Portraits, Stephen Mitchell

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •