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Thread: Hypoglycemia Question

  1. #1
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    Hypoglycemia Question

    Can hypoglycemic be bodybuilders?

  2. #2
    Steak and Eggs pusher's Avatar
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    I think hypoglycemia is a state of low blood sugar, no one is constantly hypoglycemic; you would probably die.

    If you mean diabetic, than yes you can be a bodybuilder but it would be very difficult to manipulate insulin levels safely, and any sort of carb manipulation would probably be dangerous. Imagine if you are on medication for the diabetes, traditional approaches may have to be modified.
    "The highest reward for man's toil is not what he gets for it, but what he becomes by it." -John Ruskin 1819-1900

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    Senior Member vocalmaster's Avatar
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    I believe Dave Draper is a diabetic. But you're asking about hypoglycemia, which is low blood sugar, which is caused by over insulin production.

    I would think that a person could certainly overcome that condition and be a bodybuilder. I've known diabetics that have overcome being diabetic. (They weren't BBs). It takes time and willingness to learn about helpful vitamins and herbs that can help that condition but it can be done.
    Last edited by vocalmaster; 10-01-2003 at 10:23 PM.
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    . Delphi's Avatar
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    I'd be interested in hearing which vitamins and herbs are really useful in treating diabetes. The mainstays of diabetes control are diet modification, exercise, and antihyperglycemic drugs (oral and/or injectable). If I had diabetes I wouldn't trust my eyes, kidneys, heart, and peripheral nerves to some hype about vitamins and herbs.

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    confused by simplicity bradley's Avatar
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    There are plenty of studies showing the benefits of ALA/R-ALA for people who have diabetes.

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    . Delphi's Avatar
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    I'm not aware of ALA decreasing the dose requirement of insulin or antihyperglycemic pills. Maybe for treating the neuropathy. If you've got references from reputable scientific journals (JAMA etc) fire away.

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    Senior Member vocalmaster's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Delphi
    I'd be interested in hearing which vitamins and herbs are really useful in treating diabetes. The mainstays of diabetes control are diet modification, exercise, and antihyperglycemic drugs (oral and/or injectable). If I had diabetes I wouldn't trust my eyes, kidneys, heart, and peripheral nerves to some hype about vitamins and herbs.
    Who hyped anything? I simply stated that I personally know people who have overcome diabetes and that in some cases it can be done. One guy I know didn't overcome it completely but drastically reduced the amount of insulin that he needed and he feels quite a bit better. I agree that diet and exercise, as well as other factors are important. Don't recall saying they weren't.
    Vocalmaster

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    Senior Member vocalmaster's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Delphi
    I'm not aware of ALA decreasing the dose requirement of insulin or antihyperglycemic pills. Maybe for treating the neuropathy. If you've got references from reputable scientific journals (JAMA etc) fire away.
    What about results? Do you accept that, or must you read it in a science jounal for validation?
    Vocalmaster

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    confused by simplicity bradley's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Delphi
    I'm not aware of ALA decreasing the dose requirement of insulin or antihyperglycemic pills. Maybe for treating the neuropathy. If you've got references from reputable scientific journals (JAMA etc) fire away.
    I was mainly referring to the effects the ALA has on glucose disposal in diabetics, and it also serves as a beneficial anti-oxidant. I am unaware of any studies that have shown ALA decreases the need for exogenous insulin, but it has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, through GLUT4 translocation (if I remember correctly ).

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Abstract
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Abstract

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    . Delphi's Avatar
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    Vocalmaster, the hype I was referring to is the majority of the schtick on the internet regarding unsubstantiated claims of herbal supplements "supporting" body functions. They can't say the herbals actually do anything, because that would be giving them drug status and would be illegal. Thyroid support, adrenal support, liver support, etc. In general a whole bunch of it is crap.

    I wasn't referring to your post as hype. I should have been clearer. BTW, noone has ever "overcome" diabetes. If their islet cells are wiped out by antibodies they will always be insulin dependent. If they have NIDDM they may be able to control their glucose levels with diet and exercise, but they will still be diabetic.

    Whether or not ALA is for real, I don't know. I have never seen a patient who needed Glucophage, Actos, or insulin who has claimed to be able to get off their drug(s) or reduce their dosage(s) by taking ALA. I'm interested in propsective, double-blind studies, but not anecdotal reports.

    Bradley, I'll check out your links later tonight. Thanks for the links.

  11. #11
    Senior Member vocalmaster's Avatar
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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Delphi
    "Vocalmaster, the hype I was referring to is the majority of the schtick on the internet regarding unsubstantiated claims of herbal supplements "supporting" body functions. They can't say the herbals actually do anything, because that would be giving them drug status and would be illegal. Thyroid support, adrenal support, liver support, etc. In general a whole bunch of it is crap."

    Yes, I'm aware of all this but still don't know why we've gone here with the discussion.

    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Delphi
    "BTW, noone has ever "overcome" diabetes. If their islet cells are wiped out by antibodies they will always be insulin dependent. If they have NIDDM they may be able to control their glucose levels with diet and exercise, but they will still be diabetic."

    I somewhat agree and somewhat disagree with what you're saying and I am using the term "overcome" loosely. My friend that drastically reduced his insulin intake was a type 1 diabetic. Yes, he'll always (barring a cure) have to take insulin. But he does feel much better and has probably prevented many more health problems later.

    However, others that are type 2 have overcome diabetes. Type 2 is sometimes called adult diabetes and is caused by the body's inefficient use of insulin. This can be overcome with diet, exercise, which you also said is important, as well as helpful supplements. True, that person must constantly monitor themselves and not just think that they can go back to a sloppy diet and not take care of themselves. But they can overcome it in the sense that they don't have to take glucophage, etc.. and can lead a much more healthful lifestyle. My wife is an RN and also has type 2 diabetes but she doesn't work very hard to do anything about it, much to my dismay, even though she knows people who were type 2's that are managing much better than she is.

    Please see the article below:

    You Can Overcome Type Two Diabetes


    By Terry Dorian, Ph.D.



    Of the 16 million diabetics in America, 90-95% of them suffer from Type 2 diabetes.



    CBN.com -- It is important to note that 90-95% of the 16 million diabetics in this country suffer from Type 2 (non-insulin dependent or adult-onset) diabetes, rather than Type 1 (immune-mediated) diabetes. Approximately a third of them are unaware that they have the disease. Many people do not know that they have Type 2 diabetes until they begin to experience severe symptoms or complications as a result of the disease.

    Type 1 diabetes, is characterized by the body's failure to produce insulin. Insulin is the hormone that enables glucose to enter the cells of the body. Without insulin, the membranes of the cells keep the sugar out. Thus, the glucose accumulates in the blood and the cells of the body begin to degenerate.

    Many scientific groups are pressing for a more accurate definition of Type 2 diabetes. Such groups are also urging those interested in optimal health to consider making dietary and lifestyle changes based on the research. The American Diabetes Association's definition of Type 2 diabetes and their recommended dietary guidelines for Type 2 diabetics do not represent the best research available on diabetes. The American Diabetes Association's definition of Type 2 diabetes is as follows: "Type 2 diabetes results from the body's inability to make enough or properly use insulin. The underlying problem is insulin resistance, with some degree of insulin deficiency." (Diabetes Facts and Figures, http://www.diabetes.org) The Physician's Committee for Responsible Medicine has this to say about the nature of Type 2 diabetes: "When diabetes begins in adulthood (non-insulin-dependent diabetes), it is not due to an inadequate supply of insulin. There is plenty of insulin in the bloodstream, but the cells do not respond readily to it. Sugar cannot easily get into the cells and it backs up in the bloodstream." (Diet and Diabetes, http://www.pcrm.org)

    Groups such as the Physician's Committee for Responsible Medicine believe that diabetics are compromised by the diets that most physicians prescribe for them. Studies show that when diabetics consume what is commonly regarded as a moderate intake of meats, high-fat dairy products, and oils, the cell membranes become more resistant to insulin. However, studies show that the long-term use of a high-complex-carbohydrate diet, combined with exercise, enables patients to get off insulin, as well as oral medication. PCRM has this to say about the diet that most physicians prescribe: "The typical American Diabetes Association (ADA) diet is still high in fat. The ADA diet limits the amount of butter, eggs, and so forth, but it contains about 300 milligrams of cholesterol per day and about 30 percent fat." The key to reversing Type 2 diabetes is overcoming insulin resistance. The medical community, pharmaceutical companies, and various associations recommend that Type 2 diabetics lose weight, practice better nutrition, and exercise regularly; they warn that when dietary and lifestyle changes fail to bring the disease under control, medications and/or insulin must be used. However, recommending weight loss, dietary changes, and regular exercise is meaningless unless such advice is accompanied by specific information (regarding what constitutes an optimal dietary and exercise regimen) that is based on research (e.g., epidemiological studies connecting dietary and lifestyle habits with the prevention and cure of degenerative disease).

    The United States Department of Agriculture dietary guidelines (which continue to promote market interests, rather than the conclusions of epidemiological studies) and the American Diabetes Association guidelines do not reflect the information that is available concerning the healthiest people in the world. The overwhelming majority of Americans do not understand the connection between dietary and lifestyle choices and disease.


    Also, this is from http://www.pcrm.org/health/prevmed/diabetes.html

    While people with non-insulin-dependent diabetes can often eliminate medications when their weight is reduced and foods and exercise are better controlled, those with insulin-dependence will always need a source of insulin. The cause of insulin-dependent diabetes remains elusive. Several recent studies have implicated cow’s milk consumption as a possible contributor.4,5 When milk consumption patterns were examined across various nations, there was a very strong correlation with the incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes. It may be that milk proteins cause an autoimmune reaction in which the body mistakenly attacks its own insulin-producing cells. Even so, a good diet and regular exercise can minimize the amount of insulin these diabetics require. This is especially important given their tendency toward complications, heart disease, and other blood vessel problems that are much more common in people with diabetes. So it is doubly important to keep fit and to keep dietary fat to a minimum.

    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Delphi
    "If they have NIDDM they may be able to control their glucose levels with diet and exercise, but they will still be diabetic."

    Yes, I understand what you're saying, even though an alcoholic "overcomes" alcoholism, they still have to be careful not to let it overtake them again and they will always be an alcoholic, just like a diabetic never really overcomes diabetes and will always be defined as a diabetic. So, again, I'm using the term "overcome" loosely.

    But as I said before, I know people who have "overcome" type 2 diabetes.
    Last edited by vocalmaster; 10-02-2003 at 11:01 PM.
    Vocalmaster

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