The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Party of "No." Tryska's Avatar
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    Latest Sugar Substitute

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  3. #2
    It's a Republic dammit! reloaded's Avatar
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    i prefer dextrose.
    Too cool for school.
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  4. #3
    Senior Member Spartacus's Avatar
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    Most crucially, the Spherix team devised an inexpensive way to make tagatose. Tiny quantities occur naturally in dairy products, and the process to derive it starts with whey, a byproduct of cheese-making. Lactose is extracted by removing proteins and then dissolved to form glucose and galactose. The glucose is sold off, and an enzyme is added to the galactose to form tagatose in bulk, either as syrup or crystals. Spherix patented the process in the late '80s.
    i wonder if this process destroys the whey protein. if it does, and this stuff gets popular, whey will become more expensive.

  5. #4
    confused by simplicity bradley's Avatar
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    "A 1999 Spherix-funded study at the University of Maryland, published in Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism, showed that not only is tagatose safe for diabetics, it also blunts the rise in blood sugar from regular glucose consumption."

    For a healthy individual, this might not be something that would be beneficial.

    Since the new sugar substitute is derived from galactose, which preferentially fills liver glycogen (hence the reason it is mentioned as useful for diabetics), I assume this new substitute would have the same effect, but probably not much of a concern since only a small percentage of the substance is absorbed by the body.
    I just skimmed through the article, but these were a couple of points that jumped out.

  6. #5
    Senior Member Spartacus's Avatar
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    does that mean it would could triglycerides to rise like fructose?

  7. #6
    Newd poster SquareHead's Avatar
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    I still wanna know who put the sweet-N-low!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  8. #7
    confused by simplicity bradley's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Spartacus
    does that mean it would could triglycerides to rise like fructose?
    Seems to be that way, but I doubt this would be a concern since it only has a fraction of the calories of regular sugar. If in fact it does preferentially refill liver glycogen you would have to consume a large amount to actually cause spillover into fat.

    i wonder if this process destroys the whey protein. if it does, and this stuff gets popular, whey will become more expensive.
    I doubt this will have any adverse effects on the whey, since most of the lactose is removed from whey protein before it is sold as a supplement.

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