The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
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    Rehab - Chronic Injury - Overtraining

    Where you have a muscle that has grown weaker and weaker because of overtraining and lack of rest in between, what is the best way to work it back into shape?

    I believe I have a diaphram or breathing problem that falls into this category.

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  3. #2
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
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    How did you overwork it?
    Squats work better than supplements.
    "You know, if I thought like that, I'd never put more than one plate on the bar for anything, I'd never use bands or chains, I'd never squat to parallel or below, and I'd never let out the slightest grunt when I lift. At some point in your lifting career (assuming you're planning on getting reasonably strong and big), you're going to have to accept that most people think you are some kind of freak." -Sensei
    "You're wrong, and I have a completely irrelevant pubmed abstract that may or may not say so." - Belial
    I has a blog.
    I has a facebook.

  4. #3
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    Rehab - Chronic Injury

    I believe I overworked it by doing both aerobic exercizes (bike, jogging, walking, etc.) plus playing a wind instrument for many hours (blues harp) on a daily basis, with really no days off for many months. Blues harp (harmonica) requires lots of breathing and lots of preasure both sucking (no jokes please) and blowing.

  5. #4
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    Wow... I didn't even know this was possible, but I guess that your diaphragm is a muscle just like any other. Unless you're experiencing serious problems or are really worried by it, don't go to a doctor just yet. Try taking a week off from all the things you listed that might be overworking your diaphragm. I'm not saying you have to be completely sedentary, you can walk around and stuff, but just let it chill out for awhile. After that I would slowly work back up to what you used to do. Maybe you could try not playing your music and working out on the same day (if your schedule allows it).

  6. #5
    . Delphi's Avatar
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    I think it would be very unlikely that you could get a chronic overuse injury of the diaphragm.

  7. #6
    Kitty Kung-Fu Shroud's Avatar
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    Hmm, well my wife is an occupational therapist that could probably give you some advice. If she can't then someone she knows probably could since I must know 10-15 Occupational or Physical Therapists. What has you convinced that your diaphragm is suffering from overtraining? Symptoms? Case history? I've known more than one musician and even had a roommate who was a trumpet player and never heard of anyone having such a problem (not to say that it can't happen by any means). Are you sure that it is related to your harp playing and not another lifestyle aspect?

  8. #7
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    I don't know for sure what it is related to. I'm assuming it's from too much constant use of my "breathing apparatus." I've had a stress test and other tests and the doctors tell me I'm in great shape and can find nothing wrong. I don't even know for sure it is a diaphram problem. I know that after I walk for about 10-15 minutes (not particularly fast) or play harp for that long, I get an uncomfortable feeling in the diaphram area - front and/or back. After ten minutes of playing harp I begin to lose strength and can't blow/suck with enough wind to play properly. It seems to me just like when you get to the last couple of reps in any workout and your muscles can't do any more. That's why I thought to ask for thoughts here.

  9. #8
    . Delphi's Avatar
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    This is not a community of medical experts who can make diagnoses over the internet. See a pulmonologist. I'm sorry for being so direct, but we're being inundated with requests for hands-off diagnoses lately. There's no way anyone here can tell you what's wrong with you.

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