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Thread: Should I Train This Kid?

  1. #1
    Still Plugging Away -TIM-'s Avatar
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    Should I Train This Kid?

    I recently had an aquaintance ask if I'd train her 13 year old son. She offered to pay for training time. Now I've never trained anybody but I feel I have enough knowlege to help point this kid in the right direction. A little background on him. He's 13 years old, 6'4" and weights 230 lbs. Quite a big boy for 13 years old. He plays football and does some mild weight training but it's nothing that's monitored by coaches since it's at a middle school level. She said he likes to lift but doesn't really know what to do. I guess I'm wondering how good of an idea it would be for myself to help this kid.

    I figure at the least I can offer some instruction on his diet, new exercises and help monitor his form. What do you think?
    Best way to cheat on deadlifts...

    Stand there for a few minutes, then pace back and forth a lot, huff and puff, wait until everybody's looking. Approach the bar. Back off. Approach it again. Back off. Get some water. Chalk up. Approach the bar again. Then spray some more chalk around. Wait until people start losing interest. When nobody's looking, pick it a little off the floor, and slam it down. Jump up and yell "LIGHT WEIGHT BABY". Then give high fives all around. - Belial

  2. #2
    Wannabebig Member
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    Yea why not.

  3. #3
    heading to 195
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    definitely, it'll pay off in the future when the kid is in the NFL, christ he's a beast

  4. #4
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    He is some size for a 13 year old. Definitely give a shot.
    You can always look back and know that you helped this kid achieve whatever his goals are

  5. #5
    Senior Member TheGimp's Avatar
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    I'd go for it, sounds like getting paid to do what you love.

  6. #6
    $3n10r M3mb3r defcon's Avatar
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    WHAT A MONSTER! haha, dam :| I'd def. train him, why not? Just dun let him get better lifts then you

  7. #7
    bulking
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    Wouldnt he be a little too young to start lifting seriously though? At 13 years old you still need to grow a lot!

  8. #8
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    I would really think about it before doing it. Is it possible it will become annoying to train this kid after a while? Also it's a big responsibility, make sure the kid doesn't get hurt. Otherwise though it sounds like fun and I say go for it.

  9. #9
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    I would do it for free.

    But if I lived in the states I would also make certain the kid's mom signed a waiver/release absolving me of all responsibility should the kid manage to injure himself while under my supervision.

  10. #10
    SFW! drew's Avatar
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    :withstupi

    I say go for it, but definitely make sure the kid gets a full physical and his mom signs a waiver of some sort before you step foot into a gym with him.

    Stats: Age: 34 Weight: 205 Height: 5'6"
    Gym PRs: Squat:635 Bench:560 Deadlift:495
    Meet PRs: Squat:575 Bench:525 Deadlift:510 Total: 1605@220

  11. #11
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    I'd say go for it.

    If you don't, there's a good chance that this kid will never learn how to lift properly and may end up wasting his obviously impressive genetics.

    Many of us found WBB by chance and are very lucky to have a free source of great information like this, so we should pass it on whenever we get the chance, IMO.

  12. #12
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    Just a thought, but is training a kid for football different than training him to have a nice body? Don't you need to throw in some polymetrics and other exerices for explosiveness? I don't know, I'm just throwing this out there for something to think about.
    Winners train. Losers complain.

  13. #13
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    If he's already playing football i'd assume his coach has him doing football-related drills and plyometrics.

    At his age, a good program of basic compound movements would help him perform better in his sport.

    i'd be more concerned about the "weight training" this kid's high school coach (assuming he decides to play when he gets there and this guy is like most high school coaches) would have him do.

  14. #14
    Senior Member geoffgarcia's Avatar
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    I'd give him a very basic workout plan to follow
    and leave it at that

  15. #15
    Blondieologist AtomicXY's Avatar
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    I read an article somewhere, I think in Men's Health, that kids shouldn't weight train until they are at least 16 because of natural hormone developments. I would look into this before helping him. And I definatly agree with Callahan, make the moother sign a release form before doing anything. You don't want to be responsible for anything because people are sue happy these days.
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  16. #16
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    I would avoid any sort of heavy lifting routines. For people under under 15-16 years old it'd be better to focus on 'sports-oriented' exercises (i.e. situps, push-ups, drills, etc.). The bones are still growing at his age, and heavy lifting can detrimentally effect his development.

  17. #17
    Still Plugging Away -TIM-'s Avatar
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    Dedicated - I don't think it would be annoying just because I really like offering help when it comes to training.

    Callahan - I would do it for free as well. But she offered so I'd let her. But at the same time I would only except a very small amount.

    defcon - I'd have no problem if he lifted more than me. My concern would be that he's doing it right though.

    TheBug - I'm not sure what his goals are. If it's to get stronger and faster for football or to just put on weight.

    When I talked to his mom last night I told her at a minimum I could help him adjust his diet and give him a routine that would help him meet his goals, whatever they may be. As well as show him how to properly do the exercises.

    But another question I have, and some of you have raised it as well, is can a kid at the age of 13 expect much as far as size gains? I guess he's already big so if you toned up he'd look ace. I know if nothing else he gain increased strength and speed.
    Best way to cheat on deadlifts...

    Stand there for a few minutes, then pace back and forth a lot, huff and puff, wait until everybody's looking. Approach the bar. Back off. Approach it again. Back off. Get some water. Chalk up. Approach the bar again. Then spray some more chalk around. Wait until people start losing interest. When nobody's looking, pick it a little off the floor, and slam it down. Jump up and yell "LIGHT WEIGHT BABY". Then give high fives all around. - Belial

  18. #18
    . rpffly's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Leviathan
    I would avoid any sort of heavy lifting routines. For people under under 15-16 years old it'd be better to focus on 'sports-oriented' exercises (i.e. situps, push-ups, drills, etc.). The bones are still growing at his age, and heavy lifting can detrimentally effect his development.
    This is exactly what I would have suggested. Pull ups, running stairs, overall conditioning.

  19. #19
    Cyber Playa AllUp's Avatar
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    HELL YEAH! that kids a mammoth. who cares if training will stunt his height by 1". That kid hit his growth spurts hella early and probably hit puberty at like 7. :P

    And yes, Since his body is technically still in that 'growing' age range I would imagine that kid can be beasty. Thats when I started lifting (periodically that is) Nuff said I was among the 3 strongest kids@my grade and housed peeps who started S***=)

    Seriously though. Thats such wicked potential its ridiculous. Maybe have him ask a doc as well as set up some type of disclaimer about chance of stunted growth(which doesnt matter at his size), bla, bla. Also as Lev said maybe stay away from any big sets that invole the spine, hips, or major growth-plates.
    Just MHO.
    Last edited by AllUp; 11-12-2003 at 10:29 AM.
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  20. #20
    SFW! drew's Avatar
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    Y'all are missing one very important point here. HS football coaches don't care about 13 year olds and whether they should be lifting.

    Stats: Age: 34 Weight: 205 Height: 5'6"
    Gym PRs: Squat:635 Bench:560 Deadlift:495
    Meet PRs: Squat:575 Bench:525 Deadlift:510 Total: 1605@220

  21. #21
    Still Plugging Away -TIM-'s Avatar
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    He's not in high school yet. So I'm sure no body is helping this kid. But when he does get to high school I'm sure he'll have some dumb coach give him some half assed routine to work with. Hopefully if I do get a chance to help him I can educate him enough to see through any potential BS.
    Best way to cheat on deadlifts...

    Stand there for a few minutes, then pace back and forth a lot, huff and puff, wait until everybody's looking. Approach the bar. Back off. Approach it again. Back off. Get some water. Chalk up. Approach the bar again. Then spray some more chalk around. Wait until people start losing interest. When nobody's looking, pick it a little off the floor, and slam it down. Jump up and yell "LIGHT WEIGHT BABY". Then give high fives all around. - Belial

  22. #22
    Gonnabebig Member JuniorMint6669's Avatar
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    i thought all of that nonsense about stunted growth has been disproven- and that weight training actually increases bone density.

    gains for a 13 year old... well i would imagine it depends when he hits puberty and his test starts increasing. thats part of the reason i think him lifting now would be a good idea. he wont miss out on natuarally high test levels.

  23. #23
    Grasshoppa
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    I'd focus more on showing him good compound lifts and proper form before I start training him in real heavy weights.
    Shao-LiN
    "I tried so hard and got so far, but in the end, it doesn't even matter." - Linkin Park

  24. #24
    Go Heels! MixmasterNash's Avatar
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    Play more sports with him instead. It's far more important to learn coordination and skills at a young age. And not just football. Mix it up with as many sports as possible.

    I'd say minimal weight training is required until he starts paying HS football.

    I was a skinny kid but a decent athlete, and I have to say that I am still an okay athlete because of all that time running around playing games. Anyone, even the profoundly uncoordinated, can start weight training and gain size. A number of my friends might be bigger and/or stronger, but they're not very good at sports. It's much harder to learn sports skills, and the earlier the better.

    The journal / I live here.

    If I were to start from scratch as a young 13 year old again, I would do every press, squat, and perhaps deadlifts, for my entire career with chains. -- Dan John

  25. #25
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    if you train him are you gonna do Powerlifting or just bodybuilding?

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