The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
Latest Article

The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Its no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
More Recent Articles
Contrast Training for Size
By: Lee Boyce
An Interview with Marianne Kane of Girls Gone Strong
By: Jordan Syatt
What Supplements Should I be Taking? By: Jay Wainwright
Bench Like a Girl By: Julia Ladewski
Some Thoughts on Building a Big Pull By: Christopher Mason

Facebook Join Facebook Group       Twitter Follow on Twitter       rss Subscribe via RSS
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Senior Member Meat_Head's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    3,315

    Low reps with high reps.... myo and sacro hypertrophy

    I'm wondering what you guys think of a program that involves the major strength movements being performs in multiple sets of close to maximal singles, doubles, or triples, then a few sets of more bodybuilding type exercises with reps from 6-12. For example, here's a lowerbody day:

    Squats - Work up to a submax double, do it for 3 or 4 sets
    Goodmornings - same as squats
    Leg press - 2x8-10 reps close to failure
    Leg curls - same as leg press

    The singles, doubles, and triples would serve to increase strength and provide myofibrillar hypertrophy and hypertrophy of the contractile protiens.

    The high rep sets would be for sacroplasmic hypertrophy, with no specific performance-type goals.

    Bodybuilding flexing routines would be done daily or every couple of days for a tense appearance.

    Would this be a good way to train for hypertrophy, a 'dense' look, and overall strength(powerlifting type strength)?

    If not, what would be a more effective routine?

  2.    Support Wannabebig and use AtLarge Nutrition Supplements!


  3. #2
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Baltimore, MD, USA
    Posts
    8,669
    Try it and see.

    Seems like a reasonable approach.

    (I don't know about the flexing stuff)
    Squats work better than supplements.
    "You know, if I thought like that, I'd never put more than one plate on the bar for anything, I'd never use bands or chains, I'd never squat to parallel or below, and I'd never let out the slightest grunt when I lift. At some point in your lifting career (assuming you're planning on getting reasonably strong and big), you're going to have to accept that most people think you are some kind of freak." -Sensei
    "You're wrong, and I have a completely irrelevant pubmed abstract that may or may not say so." - Belial
    I has a blog.
    I has a facebook.

  4. #3
    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    12,590
    I'm with Paul on this one. You see, contrary to what you might read on various sites etc. there really is no one agreed upon theory about what rep range will stimulate certain portions of muscle fibers etc.


    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

  5. #4
    3:16
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    4,254
    i trian with similar rep renage.

    I trian heavy with low reps then finihs with high reps.

    i am after strength and size.

    eg leg day

    squat 2 sets of 1-4 reps
    leg press - 4-5 reps
    leg press 10 reps
    leg extenstion - 12reps
    leg curls 2 sets of 10 reps.

    I do the same thing on other body parts. I am slowly getting bigger and stronger.
    but slow is relative to my newbie gains. I do not expect to progress to much faster
    my exprience - joined gym 10 years ago, 6 1/2 years hard weight training exprience.

  6. #5
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Calabasas, CA
    Posts
    171
    I think you might find the following very interesting, and appropriate for your goals.

    Variable load sets

    How to gain size, strength and speed all at once

    By Christian Thibaudeau



    Today I'm going to present to you a relatively simple training technique along with two of its variants. It's a method that?'s very effective because it can target several different muscular and neuromuscular capacities at the same time. The method comes from the work of Gilles Cometti, a French sport scientist. Now, before you go out screaming how there's no strong Frenchmen and stop listening to me, I must say that the method has been proven effective in several athletes. And if you can get past the Frenchman barrier, it will be very effective for you too!


    The method is an adaptation of what's known as contrast training which refers to alternating between a slow set and a high speed set. The new method is called Insider Contrast. Simply because you do not alternate between slow and fast sets, but between slow and fast reps. Read on, it's not as crazy as you think!


    Some logic


    We know that slow and fast training can have drastically different training effects. And we also know that light and heavy loads promote different adaptations. Fast training has a more important neuromotor component than slow training and heavy training increases strength more so than light training. In the old school method an athlete/bodybuilder would alternate periods of various types of training to develop his power, size and strength. Well, by combining explosive reps with heavy, slow reps and light slow reps you can get it all in one time!


    Furthermore, we also know that fast and slow exercises can lead to the recruitment of different muscles. An article by Dr.Tim Ziegenfuss (Short Topics no.2, T-mag issue 228) demonstrated how a fast curl increases biceps activation twice as much as the brachialis, while a slow rep will have the opposite activation pattern.


    The Big Kahuna of insider contrast training


    This is my favourite variation of the IC method and it can develop power, strength and size all at the same time. Basically you do 2 reps with 85-90% of your max, followed by 3 explosive reps at 60% and by slow reps to failure with the same 60%.


    An example could be:







    Bench press (max 400lbs)

    Rep 1: 360lbs, maximum effort rep

    Rep 2: 360lbs, maximum effort rep

    Quickly unload the bar to 240lbs (or have a partner do it)

    Rep 3: 240lbs, dynamic effort rep

    Rep 4: 240lbs, dynamic effort rep

    Rep 5: 240lbs, dynamic effort rep

    Reps 6 to failure: 240lbs, slow tempo (313) reps


    This method is very effective for individuals wanting to add size, strength and power at the same time. With this method 3-5 sets per exercise should be used.



    The painful extended variation


    This variation of the IC method is truly an example of masochism! It is a great shock method to stimulate your body out of a plateau, but it should be used infrequently because it's so hard on the body.


    The progression is: 2 reps at 85-90%, 3 explosive reps at 60%, slow reps to failure at 60%, 3 explosive reps at 30%, slow reps to failure at 30%, static hold (sticking point) with 30%.


    A set could look like this:


    Bench press (max 400lbs)

    Rep 1: 360lbs, maximum effort rep

    Rep 2: 360lbs, maximum effort rep

    Quickly unload the bar to 240lbs (or have a partner do it)

    Rep 3: 240lbs, dynamic effort rep

    Rep 4: 240lbs, dynamic effort rep

    Rep 5: 240lbs, dynamic effort rep

    Reps 6-12: 240lbs, slow tempo (313) reps to failure

    Quickly unload the bar to 120lbs (or have a partner do it)

    Rep 13: 120lbs, dynamic effort rep

    Rep 14: 120lbs, dynamic effort rep

    Rep 15: 120lbs, dynamic effort rep

    Reps 16-20: 120lbs, slow tempo (313) reps to failure

    Rep 21: 120lbs static hold at the sticking point


    (Obviously the number of reps can change depending on where you reach failure).


    This is a very intense method, one that should be used with care. Only 1-2 such sets are performed per exercise. The advantage of this method compared to the regular variation is that it will develop a little more muscle mass and more strength-endurance and power-endurance.


    The lazy man's insider contrast training


    This variation is less painful but can still provide for a very powerful growth stimulus. I recommend this method as an introduction to insider contrast training as its easier to handle at first. You will still be able to develop good strength, size and power with this method.


    A typical set will look like this: 2 reps at 80%, 2 explosive reps at 50%, 2 reps at 80% and 2 explosive reps at 50%.


    A set could look like this:


    Bench press (max 400lbs)

    Rep 1: 320lbs, moderate tempo (301)

    Rep 2: 320lbs, moderate tempo (301)

    Quickly unload the bar to 200lbs (or have a partner do it)

    Rep 3: 200lbs, dynamic effort rep

    Rep 4: 200lbs, dynamic effort rep

    Quickly load the bar to 320lbs (or have a partner do it)

    Rep 5: 320lbs, moderate tempo (301)

    Rep 6: 320lbs, moderate tempo (301)

    Quickly unload the bar to 200lbs (or have a partner do it)

    Rep 7: 200lbs, dynamic effort rep

    Rep 8: 200lbs, dynamic effort rep


    This form of IC training can be used for 3-5 sets easily. It is a great introduction to IC training and can provide for a very pleasing workout. For peoples simply interested in gaining a bit more strength, size and power this is certainly the best choice.


    Can I periodize the approach?


    Yes! A very good training cycle would look like this:


    Week 1: The lazy man's insider contrast training (moderate difficulty) for 4 sets of 4 exercises per session.


    Week 2: The Big Kahuna of insider contrast training (high difficulty) for 3 sets of 4 exercises per session.


    Week 3: The painful extended variation (very high difficulty) for 2 sets of 3 exercises per session.


    Week 4: Regular training/no insider contrast (low difficulty) for 2 sets of 10 reps for 4 exercises per session.


    This is a typical progressive loading/unloading approach that has stood the test of time. It also provides for a great training variety and lots of pain!


    I like to use an antagonist split for this method:


    Day 1: Quads/Hamstrings and Biceps triceps

    Day 2: Off

    Day 3: Abs/Lower back

    Day 4: Chest/Upper back

    Day 5: Off

    Day 6: Anterior & medial deltoid/Posterior deltoid

    Day 7: Off


    Obviously you can use a different split just as effectively.


    Conclusion


    This is yet one more weapon to add to your arsenal. A very hard, but powerful method that will bring you a lot of gains not only in muscle size, but also in physical capacities. Certainly a good option for somebody who wants it all!

  7. #6
    Administrator chris mason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    12,590
    You see Silles, now that is a solid contribution.


    AtLarge Nutrition Supplements Get the best supplements and help support Wannabebig!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •