The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
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    Aug 2002
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    Shoulder Injury (rotator cuff possibly) Please help!

    Well I was doing tricep kick backs about 2.5 months ago when I felt a strange pulling sensation in my shoulder. I immediately stopped doing my exercises and realized that I had definately hurt my shoulder. Damn was I ever pissed off! It's been 2.5 painful months and I am unable to work out very much at all. I've been training EXTREMELY light, however, my shoulder still is upset after some workouts. I don't know what the hell I can do? I've taken about 3 weeks off with no weight training at all, but still its gotten a bit better, but is iritated easily.

    Does anyone have any suggestions on creams, vitamins, supplements, etc... that will help heal the shoulder? Also, what kind of training regiment should I follow? Strictly cardio and abs for a month? I am desperate to fix this shoulder and build a solid INJURY free foundation when it is healed. I am sure many of you have been through shoulder injuries, and I would appreciate any help whatsoever. I am almost at the point where I will be asking my doctor for cortosone, or doing some other steroid to repair the damage!
    Last edited by BigTigga; 11-28-2003 at 10:34 AM.

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  3. #2
    WBB OG Silverback's Avatar
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    Cortisone aint going to repair anything just mask the pain, get yourself to a physio/sports injury specialist.

    Its impossible for us to identify the problem so go and see a professional, the main thing will be rest, stretching and mobility exercises. No lifting!

    Ive spent 8 months of this year injured with a shoulder problem and ive been seeing a SIS all the time, you must understand that in order to heal you need rest in order to repair damage, by working out you are only preventing the injury to dissapear and you could of even made it worse.

    good luck and get an appointment sorted, you got it?
    The only limits are the one's you place on yourself...

  4. #3
    Son of Krypton Majestic's Avatar
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    What most people (including myself, around 12 years ago) fail to understand, is that if you weren't physically fit enough to execute the irritating behavior BEFORE you were injured, you most CERTAINLY are NOT fit enough to execute it after a 2-4 week layoff.

    It's not a matter of just (for instance) just going back and pitching the ball lightly, etc.

    You have to flat-out take your anti-inflammatories RELIGIOUSLY for a couple weeks, with NO activity, and THEN start with light free weight work for a month. THEN you being "lightly" engaging in your previous "irritating" behavior. AFTER that, you then begin resuming your previous level of activity.

    My personal experience was from swimming in high school. I went from once a day practices, to a team trip to Floriday during Christmas break, where we swam around 10,000 yards a day (two-a-day practices). It wasn't the volume itself, per se, but the raw JUMP in volume that killed me.

    That was in the Winter time. Even by the time Summer came around, it still hurt to grip my steering wheel. For instance, I couldn't put my hands in the "10 and 2" position, and "tug apart" the wheel, without feeling an "odd and dull pain".

    Some discomfort is going to remain, for sure. But you have to use common sense, and listen to your body. And be patient. Rome wasn't built in a day.

    Sorry to rant. Just don't want you to hurt yourself. Listen to your body, and proceed with caution.

  5. #4
    Wannabebig Member
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    I've been dealing with a dodgy rotator cuff for the past 3 years. Most of the time it is OK, sometimes it's not. And I can't do certain activities anymore, like swim crawl.

    You have to learn to be patient, learn how to stop when the pain comes, learn how to rest and not go nuts while resting, and learn exercises that "circumvent" the problem area(s) and eventually work on mobility, strength, etc. But slowly!
    "Some people have told me they don't think a fat penguin really embodies the grace of Linux, which just tells me they have never seen a angry penguin charging at them in excess of 100mph. They'd be a lot more careful about what they say if they had." - Linus Torvalds

  6. #5
    Shaver of Secret Places baldguy's Avatar
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    I have plenty of experience with rotator cuffs. In a sports accident, I broke my humerus (upper arm), dislocated my shoulder and tore my rotator cuff. It took two surgeries and almost a year of rehab before I was comfortable stepping back into the gym. I then started out with 5 pound sissy weights for dumbell presses and just the bar for benching. I was 6'3" and 300 pounds lifting pink weights!

    I have been lifting steadily for the past 18 months and can now get 85# dumbbells over my head and bench 245 6-8x. I strictly followed the physical therapist's rules and stretched religiously. I now have NO PAIN in my shoulder... NONE!

    My advice to you:

    1. Go see your doctor. Not for cortisone shots, but for a referral to a good orthopedic surgeon. They can take some pictures of your shoulder and recommend the appropriate action. It may be invasive surgery, a scope, or just rest and rehab.

    2. Find a physical therapist that specializes in sports medicine. They are more apt to push you and recognize that people want to perform, not just move through life.

    3. Follow the doctor's and PT's advice verbatim.

    4. Give it time.

    5. Do not screw around with your shoulder. It is the most commonly injured area in your body. It is also harder to rehab than other parts. Your knee moves like a hinge... back and forth, while your shoulder moves 360 degrees.

    Does this mean you won't be able to lift again? No, but it may mean no lifting for 60 days or 6 months. If you choose to ignore this advice and keep lifting, you will do so at your own risk.
    -Baldguy

    Newest member of the WBBB

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    -BigCorey

  7. #6
    Wannabebig New Member
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    Dec 2003
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    Do a search on the web for self trigger point therapy, it will probably help you out a lot.

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