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Thread: what the hell is isometric contraction / static training?

  1. #1
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    what the hell is isometric contraction / static training?

    Gday all,

    I've heard of something called static training or isometric contraction, and I've tried to check it out on the internet but you always have to pay money even to find out what it is... does anyone know what this training method is? It sounds kinda dodgy but maybe someone here has tried it?

    Thx

  2. #2
    Bodybuilding Mythbuster
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    It's garbage. Basically the thinking behind this is that you grasp a static object (a bar) or push against one (a wall) and contract and flex your muscles as hard as possible.
    Actually lifting weights works far better.

  3. #3
    Player Hater PowerManDL's Avatar
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    Or of course you could do something besides jump on a bandwagon either way and realize that isometric work *is* a form of lifting weights, then using it to your advantage instead of blanketly saying it's crap without even understanding what it is.

    That'd be my assessment. But I'm silly like that.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Sug's Avatar
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    Like if your where doing barbell Shrugs, well on your 6th rep or whatever your last one is just hold the bar up with your traps flexed holding the bar in the contracted position for 10secs and you'll feel it.

  5. #5
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    if you want to eneter stong man comps, static work can be very useful indeed.
    my exprience - joined gym 10 years ago, 6 1/2 years hard weight training exprience.

  6. #6
    Tearing **** Up FortifiedIron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExtremeAnabolic
    It's garbage. Basically the thinking behind this is that you grasp a static object (a bar) or push against one (a wall) and contract and flex your muscles as hard as possible.
    Actually lifting weights works far better.

    Actually its not garbage.

    Static training is a good form of developing strength and is benefical to any lifter.

    The problem is people use it as a whole way of training which can yeild good results for awhile but will quickly cause detrimental effects on the system due to the high amount of overload. Thus it would be best to use isometric training as a tool rather then a whole way of training only.

    The carry over from isometric strength is minimal to dynamic strength, but it does yield some positive aspects to it. It can reall be useful during pull ups, shrugs, rows and other shoulder work. It could also yield results to powerlifters who have problems with lockout strength on the bench press, you can effectivly overload that region with loads of up to 110-120% of what you've used before. The key is to keep the joint angle constant and the ending result will be constant tension in that area.


    Kc

  7. #7
    Player Hater PowerManDL's Avatar
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    The carryover to dynamic movements is also more pronounced when the muscles involved are in a lengthened state.
    Vin Diesel has a fever.. and the only prescription is more cowbell.

    Budiak: That girl I maced
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    Budiak: I wish

    ShmrckPmp5: a good thing people can't fire guns through the computer...your ass would have been shot years ago

    Y2A 47: youre smooth as hell
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    galileo: you're a fucking beast and I hate you
    galileo: hate

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PowerManDL
    Or of course you could do something besides jump on a bandwagon either way and realize that isometric work *is* a form of lifting weights, then using it to your advantage instead of blanketly saying it's crap without even understanding what it is.

    That'd be my assessment. But I'm silly like that.

    Bandwagon? Looks like I'm the sole dissenting voice here. Lifting weights is better for all around development than isometric work.

  9. #9
    Soon to be lean... Joe Black's Avatar
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    Well... If you are going to blanketly say it's garbage, you should really explain why you think so.

    By saying its garbage you are saying that it in no way should be considered by any trainee for any reason, and I think if you take the time to really think about the type of training (As FI did) you will see thats probably not true.
    Last edited by Joe Black; 01-13-2004 at 06:31 AM.
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  10. #10
    Player Hater PowerManDL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExtremeAnabolic
    Lifting weights is better for all around development than isometric work.
    Prove it then.

    And you'd better be willing to back that up pretty specifically, because you've got a lot of generalizations there.
    Vin Diesel has a fever.. and the only prescription is more cowbell.

    Budiak: That girl I maced
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    Budiak: I wish

    ShmrckPmp5: a good thing people can't fire guns through the computer...your ass would have been shot years ago

    Y2A 47: youre smooth as hell
    Y2A 47: thats why you get outta tickets, and into panties

    galileo: you're a fucking beast and I hate you
    galileo: hate

    assgrabbers are never subtile, they will grabb ass whereever they go,public or not, I know the type, because I am one. - Rock

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hulk
    Well... If you are going to blanketly say it's garbage, you should really explain why you think so.

    By saying its garbage you are saying that it in no way should be considered by any trainee for any reason, and I think if you take the time to really think about the type of training (As FI did) you will see thats probably not true.

    Perhaps I should have qualifed that statement. Here it is. As regards the original poster I saw his question as asking about static training as a method of training rather than a technique. As a technique (one of many ) in a bodybuilder's regime it does have value, say in terms of building strength. But as a method of training (using it solely or mainly) which is how I saw the original poster's intention (and I apoligise to him if I am wrong) it is severely limited. One reason is the amount of load it places on the body. Most people can hold more weight in a static position than they can lower under control. This kind of overload can produce beneficial results as long as it is not overdone. Doing this on a constant basis would likely lead to overtraining thus making regular training a better tool for all-around development.
    Last edited by Songsangnim; 01-14-2004 at 04:17 AM. Reason: clarity

  12. #12
    Tearing **** Up FortifiedIron's Avatar
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    Static positioning can happen anywhere in the full ROM of the movement and not just in lockout. Therefor the eccentric strength can be a considerably more depending upon what joint angle you will be excecuting this in.

    Kc

  13. #13
    Away BigMatt's Avatar
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    i do isometric for my Hamstring ,it works great.

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    hmm I was actually wondering the same thing... Theres quite a few programs for isometric training, some say they can increase your speed/agility? Is there true at all? Heres a link http://www.athleticquickness.com/page.asp?page_id=15 basically, you use resistance bands and tie them around an immovable object and do leg exercises? Key word being basically of course. just wondering if its bull or not. Thanks
    Last edited by Josh21; 02-08-2007 at 06:08 PM.

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    I'm sure you've all tried the thing where you push your arm against a wall then let your arm go free and it rises into the air. This probably has nothing to do with static training, but what the hell causes it? Sorry but I've always wanted to know.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Isometric work has its place. Rehab work, sticking points, and flexibility/range of motion development are the first things that come to mind. As a training system, it's probably not the best for most people, but the method is fine.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
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    Of your knowledge, would you believe it could increase agility or speed like the program says it can.. or is it just a waste of time?

  18. #18
    Senior Member Sensei's Avatar
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    Yeah, it might help. Personally, I wouldn't be buying it, but that doesn't mean it's completely worthless.
    A child does not learn to squat from the top down. In other words, he does not suddenly make a conscious decision one day to squat. Actually, he is squatting one day and make the conscious decision to stand. Squatting precedes standing in the developmental sequence. This is the way a child's brain learns to use the body as the child develops movement patterns. Therefore, a child is probably crawling, rocks back into a squatting position with the back completely relaxed and the hips completely flexed, and stands when he has enough hip strength. This approach makes a lot of sense and can be applied to relearning the deep squat movement if it is lost. -Gray Cook
    Lifting Clips: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=johnnymnemonic2
    Blog: http://squatrx.blogspot.com/

  19. #19
    eater of food dw06wu's Avatar
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    Actually to those dissing it, I've seen a guy in my gym who uses some weird form of static training and he is really strong for his size. He usually puts the weight near lockout and he times himself holding it. I don't know if he shoots for a specific number or if he just tries to hold it longer each time, or what.

    I've been meaning to talk to him about it, but I don't see him any more. I think he may have graduated or left or something.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by dw06wu View Post
    (1) Actually to those dissing it, I've seen a guy in my gym who uses some weird form of static training and he is really strong for his size. (2) He usually puts the weight near lockout and he times himself holding it. I don't know if he shoots for a specific number or if he just tries to hold it longer each time, or what.

    I've been meaning to talk to him about it, but I don't see him any more. I think he may have graduated or left or something.
    (numbers are mine)

    Well, since I'm the ONLY one here "dissing it", I'll assume you are directing this post at me. A couple of points to address.

    1. That does not mean that "static training" made him strong for his size. So many people see big people doing something out of the ordinary and assume it must be this that made them big or strong when they got big and strong by doing a more conventional routine and THEN started experimenting with something different.

    2. That sounds like endurance training, not size or strength.


    And as a side note what I thought at the begining of 2004 does not necessarily mean that I still hold the same views at the beginning of 2007.

    We all (should) evolve and change in our views...or at least be open to doing so.

    That said, I still hold that conventional training (in terms of this forum) is better than static training for gaining size and strength. Static training is (IMO) just one of many techniques that can be used.
    Last edited by Songsangnim; 02-11-2007 at 04:42 AM.

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