The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

It’s no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Still Plugging Away -TIM-'s Avatar
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    Looking To Read Up On CNS

    I'd like to learn more on CNS and its role in body building. If anybody has any good articles I'd like to read them.

    Thanks
    Best way to cheat on deadlifts...

    Stand there for a few minutes, then pace back and forth a lot, huff and puff, wait until everybody's looking. Approach the bar. Back off. Approach it again. Back off. Get some water. Chalk up. Approach the bar again. Then spray some more chalk around. Wait until people start losing interest. When nobody's looking, pick it a little off the floor, and slam it down. Jump up and yell "LIGHT WEIGHT BABY". Then give high fives all around. - Belial

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  3. #2
    Player Hater PowerManDL's Avatar
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    I don't have any comprehensive articles right off hand, but the basics are fairly straightforward:

    The main parts of the brain responsible for movement are the motor cortex, which is where the impulses that become movements originate, the basal ganglia, the reticular activating system, and the cerebellum, which is where fine movement patterns are learned, stored, and refined with repeated use.

    A muscle contracts in response to impulses that originate in the motor cortex and work in a sort of feedback loop with the cerebellum. The proprioceptors, things like the golgi tendon organ and muscle spindles, provide feedback and allow the motor pattern (read any given movement) to be refined with repeated exposure. This is the source of inter-muscular coordination and all the technique in lifting.

    The neural "drive" that originates from the motor cortex is what actually causes the muscles to contract. The impulses can vary based on frequency (rate coding), recruitment number, and synchronization. At this point we're largely out of the CNS and talking about peripheral activity between the CNS and the muscle itself.

    Recruitment is largely determined by the size principle, which states that the smallest motor-units (a motor unit is defined as an alpha-motorneuron and all the fibers it innervates) with lower thresholds are recruited first, with higher and higher tension levels activating increasingly larger and more forceful MU's. The firing order is more or less static in a muscle having one function, but interestingly, a muscle having multiple functions can alter its recruitment pattern based on the movement.

    Rate coding/firing frequency is the main mechanism by which muscles increase their force output. Most muscles can activate the vast majority of their MU's between 50% and 80% of their maximum strength, depending on the muscle and the individual's efficiency. The increase in force from those values is a result of neural drive.

    Synchronization refers to the firing pattern. The MU's generally fire asynchronously, but there is good evidence that there are two "modes" of firing, the asynchronous and synchronous. The sychronous firing mode is found in displays of maximal strength and rate of force development, in other words extremely heavy and/or fast movements.

    Psychological arousal can have a major effect on the output of the nervous system. The limbic system (basal ganglia, RAS, etc) is closely linked to emotional states, so this is probably why.

    Fatigue in the CNS seems to occur due to a protective effect. Constant exposure to maximal efforts, which require a high firing frequency, seem to cause inhibition of neural output in the brain itself. This is not necessarily the same process as accomodation, whereby the neural efficiency at a given movement peaks, but may operate by related mechanisms.
    Vin Diesel has a fever.. and the only prescription is more cowbell.

    Budiak: That girl I maced
    Budiak: macked
    Budiak: heh maced
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    ShmrckPmp5: a good thing people can't fire guns through the computer...your ass would have been shot years ago

    Y2A 47: youre smooth as hell
    Y2A 47: thats why you get outta tickets, and into panties

    galileo: you're a fucking beast and I hate you
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  4. #3
    is numero uno Saint Patrick's Avatar
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    Yeah matt, very basic and straightforward lol
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  5. #4
    Still Plugging Away -TIM-'s Avatar
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    Okay so basically, the Motor Cortex and everything it encompasses are part of the Central Nervous System. They're responsible for movements and muscle contractions. And when you work out things are firing away but they will tire and wear out and need rest to continue? Am I scratching the surface of understanding yet?
    Best way to cheat on deadlifts...

    Stand there for a few minutes, then pace back and forth a lot, huff and puff, wait until everybody's looking. Approach the bar. Back off. Approach it again. Back off. Get some water. Chalk up. Approach the bar again. Then spray some more chalk around. Wait until people start losing interest. When nobody's looking, pick it a little off the floor, and slam it down. Jump up and yell "LIGHT WEIGHT BABY". Then give high fives all around. - Belial

  6. #5
    Player Hater PowerManDL's Avatar
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    That's the basic idea yeah, much the same way a muscle's components breakdown in proportion to the amount, duration and type of work they do.

    Remember that at heart we're dealing with biological systems that are responsible for transforming chemical energy into other forms-- in the case of muscle it becomes mechanical force, in nerves it is electric potentials. Tax the underlying biochemical mechanism too much and it will become damaged and require recovery. Neurons are no different from muscles in that respect.
    Vin Diesel has a fever.. and the only prescription is more cowbell.

    Budiak: That girl I maced
    Budiak: macked
    Budiak: heh maced
    Budiak: I wish

    ShmrckPmp5: a good thing people can't fire guns through the computer...your ass would have been shot years ago

    Y2A 47: youre smooth as hell
    Y2A 47: thats why you get outta tickets, and into panties

    galileo: you're a fucking beast and I hate you
    galileo: hate

    assgrabbers are never subtile, they will grabb ass whereever they go,public or not, I know the type, because I am one. - Rock

  7. #6
    Still Plugging Away -TIM-'s Avatar
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    Thanks for the information PM.
    Best way to cheat on deadlifts...

    Stand there for a few minutes, then pace back and forth a lot, huff and puff, wait until everybody's looking. Approach the bar. Back off. Approach it again. Back off. Get some water. Chalk up. Approach the bar again. Then spray some more chalk around. Wait until people start losing interest. When nobody's looking, pick it a little off the floor, and slam it down. Jump up and yell "LIGHT WEIGHT BABY". Then give high fives all around. - Belial

  8. #7
    Banned Reinier's Avatar
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    I'd like to know how the CNS changes MU firing patterns and frequencies as a result of training. I think i have a fair understanding of the process of the muscle and the CNS working... id like to know more about the process of them adapting.

  9. #8
    Banned Reinier's Avatar
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    bump

  10. #9
    Banned Reinier's Avatar
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    bazump

  11. #10
    Rollin Dubs HORNEDFROGS07's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Nissen
    Okay so basically, the Motor Cortex and everything it encompasses are part of the Central Nervous System. They're responsible for movements and muscle contractions. And when you work out things are firing away but they will tire and wear out and need rest to continue? Am I scratching the surface of understanding yet?

    From what I understand (Motor Behavior, Anatomical classes, etc.) that is the basic principle, yes.
    Vincere aut mori

    "The best inspiration is not to outdo others, but to outdo ourselves."

    "From the inside looking out, you can't explain it; from the outside looking in, you can't understand it."

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