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Thread: cottage cheese

  1. #1
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    cottage cheese

    just bought a tub of cottage cheese.

    heard it had casein, which absorbs slow and is good to eat overnight.

    im going to take it at bed time

    question, how much should i take before bed?

    let me know

  2. #2
    Pot-bellied bean pole Big & Tall's Avatar
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    This depends on your caloric needs, but I generally eat a pound at a time.
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  3. #3
    el imposible ectx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big & Tall
    This depends on your caloric needs, but I generally eat a pound at a time.
    It has casein and whey (but more casein than whey). The clear stuff at the top is usually whey. Casein is just a fancy word for milk protein...whey is just broken down casein. Each cup has about 26 grams of protein. I usually eat about 1.5 cups per sitting, depending on where I am on diet.
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  4. #4
    is numero uno Saint Patrick's Avatar
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    Yeah 1-2 cups before bed is ace.

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  5. #5
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    ectx

    what ?

    whey is broken down casein...do you have a reference for this

    as I read whey and casein are Fractions of Milk Protein

    as Alpha-Lactalbumin is a micro fraction of whey...

  6. #6
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    here is a really good co chee recipe

    1 cup co-chee
    4 ice cubes
    1-3 teaspoons of jam (strawberry or rasperry)

    blend and add water to get desired consistency

    damn tasty...

  7. #7
    Cock-Diesel Bound Optimum08's Avatar
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    ^ sounds good i might even have to try that recipe...
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  8. #8
    Pot-bellied bean pole Big & Tall's Avatar
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    I would do that w/ sugar free jam if you can. Otherwise, you are just adding a bunch of sugar to your pre-bed meal, which is not the best idea.

    edit: Thought that was Tbsp, not tsp. I guess a couple teaspoons isn't that much sugar. Still pays to keep it in check, though.
    Last edited by Big & Tall; 02-17-2004 at 06:54 AM.
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  9. #9
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    I typically eat a cup of cottage cheese every morning... What is the benefit of taking it before you sleep?
    Last edited by ctarden; 02-18-2004 at 10:54 PM.

  10. #10
    Omerta Deathwish's Avatar
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    Well since it digests slowly, I assume that you'll be absorbing the protein at a slower rate therefore absorbing more of the protein. Since you sleep you rely on the slow digesting protein since you can't be eatin protein while you sleep...atleast most of us can't.
    Last edited by Deathwish; 02-18-2004 at 11:03 PM.

  11. #11
    I wannabebig!
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    eat however much your diet allows you to fit in. Personally I eat about a cup before bed time.

  12. #12
    Senior Member TheGimp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deathwish
    Well since it digests slowly, I assume that you'll be absorbing the protein at a slower rate therefore absorbing more of the protein. Since you sleep you rely on the slow digesting protein since you can't be eatin protein while you sleep...atleast most of us can't.
    Your body makes use of almost 100% of the protein you eat regardless so it's not to do with increasing "absorbtion". However you're right about eating it before bed's purpose being to provide you with protein during an extended period when you can't eat (i.e. you're asleep). I think casein's anti-catabolic effects last for about 7 hours.

  13. #13
    Banned ogarchamplin's Avatar
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    Add a tablespoon of AppleButter on top of it...mmmmmmm

  14. #14
    el imposible ectx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holto
    ectx

    what ?

    whey is broken down casein...do you have a reference for this

    as I read whey and casein are Fractions of Milk Protein

    as Alpha-Lactalbumin is a micro fraction of whey...
    Yep, you're pretty much on it. I once read an article that described whey as simpler more digestible proteins so my brain just made an unqualified leap of faith. Whey= soluble protein...casein = insoluble protein. As is, I can't imagine imagine whey not having broken down caseinates...which is why I said what I said, still whey also includes imunoglobulins, enzymes, and other soluble proteins, which is where I'm wrong. Here's a snipet from an article I found on Whey composition:

    Milk Composition
    W L Hurley
    Department of Animal Sciences
    University of Illinois
    Urbana-Champaign

    Milk Protein
    The total protein component of milk is composed of numerous specific proteins. The primary group of milk proteins are the caseins. There are 3 or 4 caseins in the milk of most species; the different caseins are distinct molecules but have similarities in structure. Caseins have an amino acid composition which is important for growth and development of the nursing young. Caseins are fairly easily digestible in the intestine compared with many other food proteins available. This high quality, easily digestible protein in cow milk is one of the key reasons why milk is such an important human food.

    Casein is composed of several similar proteins which form a multi-molecular, granular structure called a casein micelle. In addition to casein molecules, the casein micelle contains water and salts (mainly calcium and phosphorous). Some enzymes are associated with casein micelles, too. The micellar structure of casein in milk is an important part of the mode of digestion of milk in the stomach and intestine, the basis for many of the milk products industries (such as the cheese industry), and the basis for our ability to easily separate some proteins and other components from cow milk. Casein is one of the most abundant organic components of milk, along with the lactose and milk fat. Individual molecules of casein alone are not very soluble in the aqueous environment of milk. However, the casein micelle granules are maintained as a colloidal suspension in milk. If the micellar structure is disturbed, the micelles may come apart and the casein may come out of solution, forming the gelatinous material called the curd. This is part of the basis for formation of all non-fluid milk products. Because the casein micelle is in suspension, it can be separated from the rest of milk by centrifugation at a very high speed. Generally the milk is first defatted (the cream is removed) from whole milk by low speed centrifugation (at about 5,000 to 10,000 x g), resulting in the cream layer at the top, the aqueous supernatant in the middle layer, and a small pellet of leukocytes and other debris at the bottom of the centrifuge tube. The aqueous supernatant is the skim milk (sometimes called the plasma phase of milk). Centrifugation of the skim milk in an ultracentrifuge (usually about 50,000 x g or greater) results in pelleting of the casein micelles and in a supernatant called whey (also sometimes called the serum phase of milk) which contains the water, lactose and soluble non-casein proteins. Once casein has been removed, then all other proteins left in the milk preparation are considered to be whey proteins.

    Because the casein micelle is in suspension, it can be separated from the rest of milk by centrifugation at a very high speed. Generally the milk is first defatted (the cream is removed) from whole milk by low speed centrifugation (at about 5,000 to 10,000 x g), resulting in the cream layer at the top, the aqueous supernatant, and a small pellet of leukocytes and other debris. The aqueous supernatant is the skim milk (sometimes called the plasma phase of milk). Centrifugation of the skim milk in an ultracentrifuge (usually about 50,000 x g or greater) results in pelleting of the casein and in a supernatant called whey (also sometimes called the serum phase of milk) which contains the water, lactose and soluble non-casein proteins. Once casein is removed, then by definition every other protein left in the milk preparation is a whey protein.

    Casein molecules can also be separated from the whey by precipitation of the casein with acid (similar to what happens in the stomach when milk is consumed) or by disrupting the micellar structure by partial hydrolysis of the protein molecules with a proteolytic enzyme. In the stomach of the young of many species is an enzyme called rennin which specifically hydrolyzes part of the casein micelle resulting in formation of a curd. A classic precipitation method for casein in cow milk which is done in the laboratory is to slowly add HCl (0.1 N) to lower the milk pH (normally 6.6 to 6.9) to 4.6. The casein will gradually form a precipitate, while relatively little of the other milk proteins will precipitate. Different combinations of controlled acid precipitation and enzymatic hydrolysis of casein are the foundation of the cheese industries. Often specific bacterial cultures are used to establish the conditions for lowered pH and secretion of proteolytic enzymes which form the different types of cheese.

    There are many whey proteins in milk and the specific set of whey proteins found in mammary secretions varies with the species, the stage of lactation, the presence of an intramammary infection, and other factors. The major whey proteins in cow milk are -lactoglobulin and a-lactalbumin. a-Lactalbumin is an important protein in the synthesis of lactose and its presence is central to the process of milk synthesis. -Lactoglobulin's function is not known. Other whey proteins are the immunoglobulins (antibodies; especially high in colostrum) and serum albumin (a serum protein). Whey proteins also include a long list of enzymes, hormones, growth factors, nutrient transporters, disease resistance factors, and others.

    The major milk proteins, including the caseins, -lactoglobulin and a-lactalbumin, are synthesized in the mammary epithelial cells and are only produced by the mammary gland. The immunoglobulins and serum albumin are not synthesized by the epithelial cells. Instead, they are absorbed from the blood (both serum albumin and the immunolgobulins). An exception to this is that a limited amount of immunoglobulin is synthesized by lymphocytes which reside in the mammary tissue (called plasma cells). These latter cells contribute to the local immunity of the mammary gland.
    Last edited by ectx; 02-19-2004 at 05:00 PM.
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