The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
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    Stick to the Basics?

    From reading the articles by Paul Stagg, he seems to emphasize keeping to the basics? What are the basics?

    I am new to weight lifting, I did most calisthenics in my home (pushups, pull ups, chin ups) and I am decent at those. Last physical I took I did 11 pull ups. I am 5'10", weight about 167, got some fat on me . It seems to be going away, I cut my calorie intake, and I do running or some sort of aerobic exercise (b-ball or bike) everyday.

    So what are the basics?

    Also, right now I rep at 115 and can do 2 sets of 8, but it is hard to get that last one up. I hear of people that do 3 X 6-8 reps, and people that do 2 X 6-8 reps and then the next set add weight. What do you recommend? I would love to get my bench up to about 165 in the coming months. I eat pretty well, and I have noticed a difference which is keeping me motivated at working out.

    I really appreciate you taking the time to reading this. I read the article on routines here, but those exercises didn't really seem like what the "basics" would be. So if someone could give me their routine for a beginner and what is good to eat, I would be most gracious

    I have a tone of questions, and if anyone uses AOL instant messenger, my screen name is mob00six .
    Last edited by TKoziol; 03-10-2004 at 07:03 PM.

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  3. #2
    Steak and Eggs pusher's Avatar
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    The basics are basically your core execises such as squats, deadlifts, bench, OH press, pull ups. WBB1 is a pretty good place to start.

    Bench: Lots of strength techniques for you to search. To start though, try clenching your ass and choking the bar (pavel) when you bench, you'll push prolly 5lbs more right away. But remember, progress will come if you keep at it and take it one step at a time.
    "The highest reward for man's toil is not what he gets for it, but what he becomes by it." -John Ruskin 1819-1900

    "He who fights monsters should see to it that in the process, he does not
    become a monster. And when you look into the abyss, the abyss also looks into
    you." - Nietzche

  4. #3
    Wannabebig Member
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    What do you mean clenching my ass and choking the bar? lol

  5. #4
    Steak and Eggs pusher's Avatar
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    exactly like it sounds, try it.
    "The highest reward for man's toil is not what he gets for it, but what he becomes by it." -John Ruskin 1819-1900

    "He who fights monsters should see to it that in the process, he does not
    become a monster. And when you look into the abyss, the abyss also looks into
    you." - Nietzche

  6. #5
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
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    The basics are compound lifts that, as you get stronger at them, will put lots of muscle on you in a hurry.

    Things like:
    Squats
    Deads (SLDL)
    Chins
    Rows
    Bench press
    OH press

    I would also include some core training (abs, low back) in the 'basic' category. My point is that starting out is not the time to focus on curls and kickbacks, or some specific angle to hit your inner upper bicep peak.

    I laid out how to set up a routine in at least one of the articles I wrote.

    As far as progression goes, I'd start out doing a straight progression - add weight to the bar every time you train, and get the same number of reps. Once you start missing reps, start using double progression in a rep range.

    For example, if you bench 185 for 2 sets of 8, next time, put 190 on the bar, and get 2 sets of 8. Next time, 195, and so on. When you can't get your 2 sets of 8, stay at that weight until you can (or change the rep range, and maybe stay there until you get 12, then add weight, whatever). The key is to keep progressing. When you can no longer progress on something, you need to make a larger change, either in the rep range, volume, or movement. So, perhaps you get up to 225x5 for 2 sets, and then start going backwards. Drop benching, and start doing a DB press, or dips, and work those up.
    Last edited by Paul Stagg; 03-11-2004 at 07:50 AM.
    Squats work better than supplements.
    "You know, if I thought like that, I'd never put more than one plate on the bar for anything, I'd never use bands or chains, I'd never squat to parallel or below, and I'd never let out the slightest grunt when I lift. At some point in your lifting career (assuming you're planning on getting reasonably strong and big), you're going to have to accept that most people think you are some kind of freak." -Sensei
    "You're wrong, and I have a completely irrelevant pubmed abstract that may or may not say so." - Belial
    I has a blog.
    I has a facebook.

  7. #6
    Senior Member
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    This is how I started, and still pretty much how I train today (I throw in some isolation on the arms and chest though). When I started this is what my football coach and trainer (he was a personal trainer for the Utah Jazz) suggested I do. Only compounds, the lifts that Stagg listed for you. I did this with alternating rep ranges for about a year when I was around 14. My gains were incredible. Many lifters these days make the major mistake of isolating too early. They do not understand that by doing compounds there is a capability of doing more weight plus working out many muscle groups in one instance. KISS. Stick to what Stagg told you, its the best advice you will ever get when it comes to bodybuilding.

  8. #7
    Wannabebig Member
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    Basics <> cute stuff.

    Don't get cute with it. Keep it simple and heavy.

  9. #8
    Wannabebig Member
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    Paul and everyone that posted: thanks a lot

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