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Thread: General Questions about Growth and Lifting

  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
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    General Questions about Growth and Lifting

    I apologize ahead of time because I'm sure most of these questions are asked every 2 days here, but like most of us I don't have the time to read 10 pages back to make sure... anyway. I have a few basic nagging questions I've been concerned with:

    Testosterone Production
    I'm 22 but feel that during puberty (which I'm not 100% convinced I'm completely done with; I'm definately a late bloomer), I wasn't producing the amount of testosterone I would feel is quite normal. This has lead to a generally skinny stature, not a huge amount of facial hair and a young look, among other things. However, from what I've read, testosterone is generated naturally during weightlifting, specifically during deadlifts, benchpresses and squats. My question is, since I'm on a mission for as much testosterone as possible, is there any way I can generate even more, naturally? I already do all three of these exercises, but short of actually getting on testosterone injections, I want to produce as much as I can. Is there anything else i can do, especially anything I might be able to do in between workouts, to improve my production of it? I've been working out for 3 months and already feel that it's given me a slight edge in growth, but I want to keep it increasing.

    Workout Schedules
    I know the million dollar question is always when to work out and how often, but after reading the millions of arguments both ways, the general consensus seems to be (on a basic level), to do roughly 3-4 days a week at most and mix up your exercises within those days. However, from what I always read about bodybuilders, they talk about schedules where they spend 4 hours in the gym and work out every day. My question is, how can even bodybuilders sustain this? I mean doesn't the body do its actual growing and bulking up during your rest periods? I'd like to work out as much as possible without overtraining, but I can't figure out how a daily workout schedule could work without being counter-productive.

    Abs
    I've read in places that the abs are somewhat different than other muscules in the sense that you can work them daily without overtraining them. Since getting results on abs is pretty tough, and I'd like to see a more defined ab area as much as anyone else, is it true I can do an ab workout daily?

    Thanks, and again I apologize for asking questions that are probably annoying by now.

  2. #2
    Senior Member always_losing's Avatar
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    I dont know much about testosterone other than it is produced during training and can facilitate muscle growth. And muscle growth seems to be what you after, so why not try HST. This encompasses abs aswell. Go check it out on <http://www.hypertrophy-specific.com/hst_index.html>

  3. #3
    Senior Member always_losing's Avatar
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    "Training causes an increase in androgen receptors (testosterone receptors) on muscle cells, which increases the sensitivity of your muscle to your natural testosterone levels. This effect of training on androgen receptors is specific to muscle tissue. In other words, you are not going to see an increase in the effects of testosterone in other tissues such as your hair or your skin. So unlike using steroids, training only increases the effects of testosterone in muscle tissue." - Found this, may interest you too.

  4. #4
    mind/body zen's Avatar
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    So many issues.

    First off, natural Testosterone production. I'm definately no expert on endocrine system and peuberty, but I was a late bloomer myself. However, I don't necessarily blame it on low testosterone. I was rather lean in my HighSchool years (particularly my hearly HS years), and even though I grew as fast (or faster) then average in height, I was a hard gainer with weights, and I was a bit late getting the facial hair and all that. I had a "baby face" all through college. lol
    I personally attribute that to low androgenic testosterone type. I'm in my 30's and still can't grow a full beard (and I have no asian or native american blood, so that's not the reason). But I dont' complain, because my brothers are both bald now and I haven't even started to go thin. :P
    Just because you are tall and lean, does not mean you have lower testosterone. You may infact have even more. But being an 'ectomorph' bodytype can be frustrating.
    Does heavy lifting increase natural testosterone? I don't do much reading but I can tell you that when I was younger, after heavy leg days I would break out with acne. So there's a sign right there.
    Anyway, don't assume that your test is low. You are probably challenged with the ectomorph body type and will face hard-gainer's syndrome.
    Time is your friend. I know timeframes in terms of years seem ultimately daunting when you want to be "big" now, but consistent vigilence is your friend even more then immediate intensity.

    Workout Schedules
    You will never be able to lift for 4 hours perday nearly everyday if you go natural, and I doubt most people do that who are juicing.
    Like I said above, consistent persistence over time will be the key for you, so you don't want to burn yourself out. I've been working out every other day for 3 years (with a few breaks, like when I broke my foot), and have been making patient gains the entire time (with the occasional plateaus, yes). If I would have been lifting every day, as much as I love it, I would have burned myself out mentally simply because it would have taken too much away from my time every day (not to mention I probably would have been overtraining).
    Mixing up exercises is great but you need to build that around your core exercises (bench, squats, etc). I lift at home so I try to mix up resistence and reps (throw in a day with burst type movements once in a while, or longer negatives occasionally).
    Anyway, most muscles need atleast 48 hours of rest before you hit them again. I go 96. So give it 110% intensity when you are in with the weights, but then go and rest and don't allow yourself to be so consumed with lifting that you will burn yourself out mentally.

    Abs. Don't go doing abs everyday, even if they can take it. That's just my opinion. It's overkill.
    I'd be willing to bed that some guys can get 6pack abs without ever working on them just because of the fat that they got their bodyfat level down far enough. I'm not saying never to do Abs, but if you are bulking up and you have a healthy layer of fat on your belly (or more) all the Ab work in the world isn't going to make that 6-pack shine through.
    Last edited by zen; 03-21-2004 at 02:19 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member TheGimp's Avatar
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    A diet containing enough saturated and monounsaturated fat can increase blood concetrations of testosterone. Ensure at least 10% of daily calories come from fat, any less would be detrimental. (30% would be a far better value to aim for anyway)

    The thing to bear in mind when reading about these body builders is that they are on steroids which allows them to recover far more quickly than a natural individual. WBB routine #1 is a good beginner's routine.

    Finally, my take on abs is to train them as you would any other muscle. That means as frequently as you would any other muscle group (whether its once or twice a week, or every session if you're doing full body). However people obviously have success training them on every rest days or simply every day. You need to experiment and find works best for you. Bear in mind however than a far greater determining factor in abdominal definition will be your body fat percentage.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Spartacus's Avatar
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    there isn't much you can do to increase testosterone production, otehr than making sure you get enough fats and essential minerals in your diet. excersice with compound movements is good but not because of testosterone.

    muscles don't need 48 hours in between trainings, but make sure you train each muscle at least twice a week.

  7. #7
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xgs
    I apologize ahead of time because I'm sure most of these questions are asked every 2 days here, but like most of us I don't have the time to read 10 pages back to make sure... anyway. I have a few basic nagging questions I've been concerned with:

    Testosterone Production
    I'm 22 but feel that during puberty (which I'm not 100% convinced I'm completely done with; I'm definately a late bloomer), I wasn't producing the amount of testosterone I would feel is quite normal. This has lead to a generally skinny stature, not a huge amount of facial hair and a young look, among other things. However, from what I've read, testosterone is generated naturally during weightlifting, specifically during deadlifts, benchpresses and squats. My question is, since I'm on a mission for as much testosterone as possible, is there any way I can generate even more, naturally? I already do all three of these exercises, but short of actually getting on testosterone injections, I want to produce as much as I can. Is there anything else i can do, especially anything I might be able to do in between workouts, to improve my production of it? I've been working out for 3 months and already feel that it's given me a slight edge in growth, but I want to keep it increasing.
    Probably not enough to matter much. Keep at the lifting, though.
    Workout Schedules
    I know the million dollar question is always when to work out and how often, but after reading the millions of arguments both ways, the general consensus seems to be (on a basic level), to do roughly 3-4 days a week at most and mix up your exercises within those days. However, from what I always read about bodybuilders, they talk about schedules where they spend 4 hours in the gym and work out every day. My question is, how can even bodybuilders sustain this? I mean doesn't the body do its actual growing and bulking up during your rest periods? I'd like to work out as much as possible without overtraining, but I can't figure out how a daily workout schedule could work without being counter-productive.
    Most don't, and those who do don't do anything else. 3-4 days a week, an hour or so at a pop is a good general reccomendation.

    Abs
    I've read in places that the abs are somewhat different than other muscules in the sense that you can work them daily without overtraining them. Since getting results on abs is pretty tough, and I'd like to see a more defined ab area as much as anyone else, is it true I can do an ab workout daily?
    No, your abs need to recover, too. Ab 'results' are driven by diet.
    Squats work better than supplements.
    "You know, if I thought like that, I'd never put more than one plate on the bar for anything, I'd never use bands or chains, I'd never squat to parallel or below, and I'd never let out the slightest grunt when I lift. At some point in your lifting career (assuming you're planning on getting reasonably strong and big), you're going to have to accept that most people think you are some kind of freak." -Sensei
    "You're wrong, and I have a completely irrelevant pubmed abstract that may or may not say so." - Belial
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