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Thread: grip strength

  1. #1
    GLADIATOR RykardMaximus's Avatar
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    grip strength

    HI,

    I have made mtself a wrist roller using a piece of 1.5inch pipe and some string.

    My question is how do you guys use this? I am using 2kg and my forearms are toast after one 'rep'. How heavy are you guys going?

    Rich
    ON MY COMMAND... UNLEASH HELL!!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    i started obsessing about the size of my forearms and the strength of my grip at the beginning of when i started training. the annoying thing is, as soon as i stopped worrying about grip strength and forearm size and got on with doing heavy compound movements, my forearms and grip took off without any direct work. my forarms hurt after ANY of my training days simply becasue my grip gets used so much for the other exercises. my forearms are getting overtrained if anything becasue they get hammered 3x a week when i train.

    my advice is dont worry about grip and forearms. They will grow rapidly when you start having to use them to hold heavy bars and dumbels for the big compound movements.

    Augs

  3. #3
    Banned
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    Grip exercises and forearm exercises are not one in the same.

    For forearm work, we have wrist curls, extentions and various twisting movements of the forearm.

    For grip work, we have crushing grip movents, pinch grip, fingering movements and work with barbells and dumbbells like static holds.

    These two should not be mistaken for each other or classified under the same category. I realize that many people feel fatigue in their forearms when performing gripping exercises. This is because of either forward and backward movements of the wrist, or just involentary contraction of the forearm muscles while gripping an object.

  4. #4
    MilliVanilli
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    Okay, this advice is taken from a World's Strongman in a piece he commented on in the latest issue of Men's Health. <I forget the guy's name but I could find out if someone really wants to know...>


    He recommended taking a dumbbell and wrapping a piece of duct tape around it every workout. Just one little piece every workout and over time the tape is going to build up, and force your grip wider, thus making it harder to grip and giving a better grip and forearm workout. After a few months of this, you should be like a gorilla.

  5. #5
    Senior Member PiKappaWRX's Avatar
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    just don't use gloves and your grip will get better and your forearms will get bigger. that's what i've found at least.

  6. #6
    Cyber Playa AllUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ianack4life
    After a few months of this, you should be like a gorilla.
    lol.
    AUIU
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    Brawl: "Fill it with rocks , walk up to the sales dude and hit him in the face with it . When he falls down kick him in the neck and say " this stuff is junk "."

    Brawl: "Or grab a bottle bust it on the table and stab him in his neck"

  7. #7
    Toughest Man in the World Bruise Brubaker's Avatar
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    "I realize that many people feel fatigue in their forearms when performing gripping exercises. This is because of either forward and backward movements of the wrist, or just involentary contraction of the forearm muscles while gripping an object."

    http://www.exrx.net/Muscles/WristFlexors.html

    I read that the main muscles flexing the fingers are the wrist flexors...

    Also, we easily feel the muscles of the forearm contracting when flexing the fingers, and we even see the tendons moving.

  8. #8
    Wannabebig Member
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    I used to ignore direct forearm works besides the occasional wrist curls too. I've always done heavy DL's, weighted pull-ups, and other grip intensive exercises, so I figured they were sufficiently trained there. Then I read an article about how grip training can boost strength in pull-ups, so I figured I'd give it a try. I got myself a wrist roller and a couple levels of Captains of Crush grippers (http://www6.mailordercentral.com/iro...cts.asp?dept=8) and went to town. I tested my pull-ups and it was easy as pie to break my current PR. I went from 17 to 22 in a matter of 3 weeks. My DL poundage also increased.

    From that point on, I've seen the necessity of training the forearms and more specifically the grip. I've even invested in clubbells (http://www.clubbell.tv), a modern version of old indian clubs, and I've had great success with adding them to my normal weight lifting routine.
    Last edited by Ford Prefect; 05-11-2004 at 11:34 AM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    Just so you know...

    The muscles that flex and exted the wrist are in the forearm. the msucles that flex and extend all the fingers and the thumb are in the forearm.

    There are whats termed "intrinsic" muscles of the hand situated in the hand itself 9where room for much else is impissible). These muscles are the ones that spread and unspread the fingers (if you get that movement in your head).

    Any time you grip and subsequently move that gripped object you are going to use just about every single muscle of the forarm. People dont seem to get the fact that your forearm is the shape it is becasue it is packed with all the muscles that attach to very long tendons that run into the wrist and tendons.

    That said, if you strengthen your grip through grip related exercises then obviously its going to stop being the limiting factor for that exercise. The addage "if you want to get strong at squatting then squat" applies here. If you want to get strong at gripping things then grip a lot of things tightly. If you want to grip things more tightly than you need for your current level of squatting/benching/pullups or whatever then you will need to dedicate time to grip related exercises as opposed to simply relying on the fact your grip will grow with the weights you lug around when you train 3 or 4 times a week.

    Aug.

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