The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #26
    Wannabebig Member Podium Kreatin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alterego
    The most dangerous exercises are probably squats, deads and leg press because they exert tremendous pressure on the joints at an age you're growing most.
    what're u basing this on? "8 years experience and 10 years of talking"?

    how many ppl u know that had messed up growth over these 8 years?

    ask ur doctor if stress on ur bones will mess up ur bone growth. he will say that stress on ur bones will make ur bones stronger!

    what basis do u think squats are worst b/c they give teh most stress to the bones? thats' actually a good thing! growth hormone levels in the blood goes up 500% right after finishing breathing squats! u can measure this, and it has been done

    explain why old ppl (>60years) who don't excercise lose much more bone mass than old ppl who lift weights. teh answer: stress strengthens bone

    explain why astronauts who go to space come back to earth with bone problems. answer: w/o stress, bones have no reason to be stronger, so they become deteriorated when astronauts coem back to earth, where there IS gravity.

    fact: lifting will make your bones stronger at any age.
    fact: bad form may mess up ur joints, but won't do much to ur bones.
    fact: if u lift heavy weights, and ur bones dont' hurt, then there's no damageto the bones (did u ever max out on a squat and ur shins hurt? prolly not, even at maxed out weights, ur bones are able to resist such mass)

    no offense, but your 8 years of lifting and 10 years of talking to amateurs and pros cannot answer these questions, but medical logic can. i still dont know where this myth came from, cuz i've never seen any photos or read any stories of ppl with messed up bones b/c they lifted too early. NEVER
    Last edited by Podium Kreatin; 05-22-2004 at 08:26 PM.
    "No one can completely believe that I am natural.
    The most important drug is to train like a madman
    -really like a madman
    The people who accuse me are those who have never trained once in their life as I train every day of my life."

    Alexandr Karelin
    Ten-time World Greco-Roman Champion
    1988, 1992, 1996 Olympic gold medalist

    current stats (10/19/03): 20yrs, M, 5'4 @160lbs, ~11% body fat
    lifted since march 2000
    occupation:MCB major @ uc berkeley

  2. #27
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    I'm about 5 foot 10 and I've been this way since the 7th grade, I've only gotten heavier due to an increase in muscle which is due, in part, to lifting, which started freshman year ('m a sophomore) and to the natural progression of puberty. IMO, if I never started lifting I think I'd still be this height, but a lot skinnier.

  3. #28
    Banned edge-man's Avatar
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    "Heavy lifting can put too much strain on young muscles, tendons and growth plates, especially when proper technique is sacrificed in favor of lifting larger amounts of weight," says Edward Laskowski, M.D., a physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., and co-director of Mayo Clinic's Sports Medicine Center.

    - A quick google.

    I don't have evidence to support this, but years ago I remember reading or somebody telling me about Nazi training regimes for young soldiers. As low as the age of 12 or 13 they were subjecting them to heavy weight training schedules, and from this they managed to create extremely strong and fit men to fight in the battlefield. The downside to these "elite" soldiers was that their bones would fracture due to any small impact, and so this is another reason why caution should be taken when training while still growing. Stories like this and others will probably be the start of these "myths" in the 1950s as some people have pointed out previously.

    *note* Bones can be "strong" and still be "brittle"

    Take care.
    Last edited by edge-man; 05-23-2004 at 11:48 AM. Reason: minor detail missed out

  4. #29
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    I'll use my own case to prove the myth wrong, I started lifting, doing squats and cleans(we didn't do deadlifts yet) and alot of other lifts when I was in the summer of grade 7 and I was about 5'2 and about 95 pounds, I kept lifting every off season and now I'm just over 6'0 and 190 pounds.
    Calgary Stampeder!
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  5. #30
    Senior Member Ebu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edge-man
    "Heavy lifting can put too much strain on young muscles, tendons and growth plates, especially when proper technique is sacrificed in favor of lifting larger amounts of weight,"
    Key phrase = "when proper technique is sacrificed"

    I would like to thank the captain obvious that made that statement, because it goes for "old" muscles as well... (I'm not referring to edge-man, i'm referring to Edward Laskowski)
    "Color outside the lines"

  6. #31
    Senior Member dblockspky's Avatar
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    oh yea i remember i job shadowed an orthopedic surgeon for school.. squats DO or maybe i should say can prevent growth if you start at a young age. there is some type of opening or space that doctors can look at on an xray to see how much room you have left to grow.. if you do squats or put a lot of pressure on your back then it closes a lot quicker. also heavy weight does put pressure on joints.. and depending on the person it can or cannot be enough to injure you. the theory of stunting growth does not apply to everyone same as lifting makes bones stronger.. get a 90 year old under a squat bar with only 225 on it.. he could go down with perfect form but still end up breaking his knee or back or somethin(not a fact but a highly logical statement) but then there is also the case of that 90 year old that would go under the bar and rep it out 5 times
    Last edited by dblockspky; 05-23-2004 at 05:51 PM.

  7. #32
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    No experiments in the world could answer the question to whether weightlifting stunts growth. It's purely genetic, and you don't know how tall you'll grow. I think the only real way to test this highly debated theory out is if we get identical twins. Get one guy to work his ass off with squats. Get the other guy to just play sports and stay fit.

    I don't have answers for all of you, like you won't have all the answers for me.

    Pressure on the bones is good... to an extent. 400 pounds is an awful lot of weight on the average 16-year-old kid.

    I remember reading an article about heavy backpacks that teens have to carry around. It talked about the spinal pressure and how it's dangerious for kids, and how it could affect their growth. You ever wonder why your friends come back from summer vacation and they grew a lot? They didn't carry backpacks.

    I have a lot of friends who started lifting at around 12 and 13. They were taller than me. Now I'm taller than them. Matter of fact, they haven't grown since they started lifting. They're the same height.

    You ever wonder why the high school football team is so damn short? All my friends who joined it stopped growing.

    I used to go to church that had a family I was pretty close with. The dad is 6'. He has four kids - three sons, one daughter. The firstborn is like 5'10. Second born is like 5'4 or 5'5. Third born is over 6'. The daughter's the youngest and she's taller than the second born. Guess what? The second born started lifting weights when he was 15/16. He only did it for a few months, and he told me he regrets it now.

    Why do you think this debate is so popular? How did it even start? People experienced it. People told their stories. Stories circulated.

    I personally only knew two guys who continued growing even while lifting, which I credit strongly to their genes. One of these guys was a close friend of mine and he's built like a football player. He didn't lift seriously, only occasionally, but he was just one of those guys who had extremely strong bone structures and had muscles for no real reason. The other guy was black, and his cousin is Steve Smith of Atlanta Hawks.

    I have never seen an 18 year old who's really built and tall. Maybe Lebron James, but he's not that buff and he's only one out of how many billion? All the guys who were buff in my high school senior year for instance were all 5'6 or shorter.

    I believe moderate lifting is safe, but nobody does moderate lifting when they're kids and ambitious to get strong. They lift heavy and recklessly. Even if they have trainers, they make errors. Anyone who's buff that tells you they didn't make a million errors in the process of getting muscular is either BSing or they're God.

  8. #33
    "Tuna Boy" NateDogg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alterego
    I remember reading an article about heavy backpacks that teens have to carry around. It talked about the spinal pressure and how it's dangerious for kids, and how it could affect their growth. You ever wonder why your friends come back from summer vacation and they grew a lot? They didn't carry backpacks.

    ***You don't squat for hours at a time, nor does the bar push against your spine from the back.

    I have a lot of friends who started lifting at around 12 and 13. They were taller than me. Now I'm taller than them. Matter of fact, they haven't grown since they started lifting. They're the same height.

    ***I know people I was taller than when I was younger, now they're taller than I am. I didn't lift when I was that young. How do you explain that?

    You ever wonder why the high school football team is so damn short? All my friends who joined it stopped growing.

    ***WTF? Whose high school football team? Are you seriously saying that high school football teams everywhere have only short players because they all lift?

    I used to go to church that had a family I was pretty close with. The dad is 6'. He has four kids - three sons, one daughter. The firstborn is like 5'10. Second born is like 5'4 or 5'5. Third born is over 6'. The daughter's the youngest and she's taller than the second born. Guess what? The second born started lifting weights when he was 15/16. He only did it for a few months, and he told me he regrets it now.

    ***I gues this proves it, one kid lifted and that obviously is the only thing that could possibly have "caused" him to be shorter than his sister.

    Why do you think this debate is so popular? How did it even start? People experienced it. People told their stories. Stories circulated.

    ***Whacking off will also make you go blind, and yes, if you keep crossing your eyes then WILL stay like that.

    I personally only knew two guys who continued growing even while lifting, which I credit strongly to their genes. One of these guys was a close friend of mine and he's built like a football player. He didn't lift seriously, only occasionally, but he was just one of those guys who had extremely strong bone structures and had muscles for no real reason. The other guy was black, and his cousin is Steve Smith of Atlanta Hawks.

    ***Oh, right then only blacks will continue to grow if they lift.

    I have never seen an 18 year old who's really built and tall. Maybe Lebron James, but he's not that buff and he's only one out of how many billion? All the guys who were buff in my high school senior year for instance were all 5'6 or shorter.

    ***How many 18 year olds to you know that lift, and have a clue what they are doing?

    I believe moderate lifting is safe, but nobody does moderate lifting when they're kids and ambitious to get strong. They lift heavy and recklessly. Even if they have trainers, they make errors. Anyone who's buff that tells you they didn't make a million errors in the process of getting muscular is either BSing or they're God.

    Again, supervision is vital. No one ever said that it was not.
    Also again, I guess you'd never let your kids leave the house. You do know of course that the forces generated by running, jumping, jumping off walls, etc, FAR exceed any that could possibly be generated by weight training.
    "damn...can't beat logic like that.
    NAte is exactly right." - Tryska

  9. #34
    Omerta Deathwish's Avatar
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    I have a friend that started working out when he was 13. He's 16 now, taller than me, pretty strong and still a year younger. That ****er. Start lifting ASAP. You're not going to grow much taller at 16 anyways.

  10. #35
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    Well, I think my question was answered pretty quickly, and that was that the claim was bull ****.

    I don't have much of a doubt that lifting weights does not stunt growth. Looking at a select few people who are built and short does not mean that weightlifting causes people to be short (as a matter of fact I recall a trainer at my gym saying that he started several of his nephews on a rigorous weight lifting routine when they were very young -- around 8-10-, and many of them grew to be over 6'). There have been no studies nor analytical evidence to suggest that weightlifting stunts growth at all. If anything it increases growth hormones and causes people to become bigger with adequate nutrition.

  11. #36
    Wannabebig Member Podium Kreatin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alterego
    I remember reading an article about heavy backpacks that teens have to carry around. It talked about the spinal pressure and how it's dangerious for kids, and how it could affect their growth. You ever wonder why your friends come back from summer vacation and they grew a lot? They didn't carry backpacks.
    lol @ "they didnt' carry backpacks." NO, i believe hormones during puberty made them taller, not b/c they didn't carry backpacks, and the fact that u don't notice ppl getting taller if u see them everyday ("hey, i haven't seen you in a while! have u lost weight?"). the idea that carrying backpacks is bad for the back is b/c when u put weight (less than 10lbs for crying out loud!), it displaces your center of gravity so that most ppl will slouch over, esp when they walk around for a long time, and stop caring about posture. THIS is what causes back problems (no effects on growth still, this is nerve damage), and not the weight. if u walked around w/ bad posture, u will get teh same back pain.

    alterego; u need to find at least some credible sources to back up ur ideas, u can't base things on what ppl tell u, or what u heard from this and that. i'm pre-med, and its a CONSENSUS in the medical community for decades that resistance training will develop the bones stronger, regardless of age.

    No experiments in the world could answer the question to whether weightlifting stunts growth
    experiments have proven the opposite. if u put stress on bones, ur body releases GH. muay thai kickboxers who kick iron bags have super-dense shins that can kick through baseball bats, and they train from age 5! but there hasnt' been ANY evidence that stress on bones (such as lifting) stunts growth. i'd be surprised to see one.
    Last edited by Podium Kreatin; 05-23-2004 at 10:44 PM.
    "No one can completely believe that I am natural.
    The most important drug is to train like a madman
    -really like a madman
    The people who accuse me are those who have never trained once in their life as I train every day of my life."

    Alexandr Karelin
    Ten-time World Greco-Roman Champion
    1988, 1992, 1996 Olympic gold medalist

    current stats (10/19/03): 20yrs, M, 5'4 @160lbs, ~11% body fat
    lifted since march 2000
    occupation:MCB major @ uc berkeley

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