The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
    Wannabebig Member
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    Mar 2004
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    Body Fat, Cutting, Bulking.

    1. What is the best method for lowering body fat without losing muscle, and I mean to vey low b/f levels. Are there certain techniques for achieving this (ie keeping your heart rate at a certain % of max whilst performing aerobic activity, performing aerobic activity at different times of the day, intensity of aerobic activity, etc?) Diet is covered.

    2. Is the use of bulking then cutting really neccessary? It seems to me as a technique used by professional bodybuilders (who probably still do a fair bit of aerobic activity anyway during bulking) or people who can't be bothered doing aerobic activity throughout the entire year and so go mad on "cutting" when the summer months roll around. I understand that you have to increase your calorie intake in order to gain mass but does this mean that you have to put on fat in the process? Is not keeping the protein intake high and the fat intake low aswell as maintaining both aerobic and anaerobic activities at the same time enough to both increase muscle mass and keep a low body fat level?

    Is it true that aerobic exercise will hinder your efforts to increase muscle mass or is it just a myth?

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  3. #2
    En botella whey! Max-Mex's Avatar
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    Sep 2002
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    Dorchester, MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ashley
    1. What is the best method for lowering body fat without losing muscle, and I mean to vey low b/f levels. Are there certain techniques for achieving this (ie keeping your heart rate at a certain % of max whilst performing aerobic activity, performing aerobic activity at different times of the day, intensity of aerobic activity, etc?) Diet is covered.
    Do a slow cut. Anytime you lose weight quickly, you are more likely to lose muscle as well. Usually this requires one to drastically cut calories and do some form of cardio.

    2. Is the use of bulking then cutting really neccessary? It seems to me as a technique used by professional bodybuilders (who probably still do a fair bit of aerobic activity anyway during bulking) or people who can't be bothered doing aerobic activity throughout the entire year and so go mad on "cutting" when the summer months roll around. I understand that you have to increase your calorie intake in order to gain mass but does this mean that you have to put on fat in the process? Is not keeping the protein intake high and the fat intake low aswell as maintaining both aerobic and anaerobic activities at the same time enough to both increase muscle mass and keep a low body fat level?

    Is it true that aerobic exercise will hinder your efforts to increase muscle mass or is it just a myth?
    Doing cardio affects muscle growth in that you have to make up those calories somehow. So if you run for 20 mins, you might burn say 300 calories. Along with the weights, that's an extra 300 calories you will probably have to make up. Not doing cardio helps with bulking because all the calories are going to bulk. Low fat intake is a myth. Maybe saturated fats is a good idea, but all fats is bad. Good fats should be at reasonable levels when cutting(due to high caloric counts in fats) and higher when bulking.

    As with cutting, doing a slow bulk can keep the BF low. Doing things quickly results in muscle lost(cutting) and high BF levels(bulking).
    Burritos are the bomb for bulking!
    My Food Journal


    PB's&Goals

    Deadlift: PR 1@440, Goal 1@450
    Squat: PR 1@375, Goal 1@400
    Bench: PR 2@275, Goal 1@300

  4. #3
    As I Am Paul Stagg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ashley
    1. What is the best method for lowering body fat without losing muscle, and I mean to vey low b/f levels. Are there certain techniques for achieving this (ie keeping your heart rate at a certain % of max whilst performing aerobic activity, performing aerobic activity at different times of the day, intensity of aerobic activity, etc?) Diet is covered.
    The main key is diet, not cardio. IMO, a mix of methods is probably a good approach - most folks will make a case for HIIT work, and I would tend to agree. A main issue is finding the right volume of work, which will depend on a host of factors, so there isn't one 'best' method.

    2. Is the use of bulking then cutting really neccessary? It seems to me as a technique used by professional bodybuilders (who probably still do a fair bit of aerobic activity anyway during bulking) or people who can't be bothered doing aerobic activity throughout the entire year and so go mad on "cutting" when the summer months roll around. I understand that you have to increase your calorie intake in order to gain mass but does this mean that you have to put on fat in the process? Is not keeping the protein intake high and the fat intake low aswell as maintaining both aerobic and anaerobic activities at the same time enough to both increase muscle mass and keep a low body fat level?
    Generally, you can gain muscle and keep fat gain to a minimum, but your gain will be pretty slow. 'Bulking' and 'Cutting' tends to be a better approach because you gain lots of muscle fast, then lose a lot of fat, but keep the muscle. Two of these cycles may or may not result in the same mass gain as a slower method. Give it a try, and see how it works for you.


    Is it true that aerobic exercise will hinder your efforts to increase muscle mass or is it just a myth?
    Depends on how much you do. 20 minutes 3 times a week? No problem, and it will probably help. 1 hour 6 times a week? That's probably going to hinder your muscle gaining efforts.
    Squats work better than supplements.
    "You know, if I thought like that, I'd never put more than one plate on the bar for anything, I'd never use bands or chains, I'd never squat to parallel or below, and I'd never let out the slightest grunt when I lift. At some point in your lifting career (assuming you're planning on getting reasonably strong and big), you're going to have to accept that most people think you are some kind of freak." -Sensei
    "You're wrong, and I have a completely irrelevant pubmed abstract that may or may not say so." - Belial
    I has a blog.
    I has a facebook.

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