The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #26
    Senior Member geoffgarcia's Avatar
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    no, I've always felt that the benefit of doing supersets is limited unless ur doing it to prefatigue by isolating the larger body part first...

    compounded with the studies that show multiple sets doesn't equal multiple benefits and the points Haycock mentions on muscle failure

    Quote Originally Posted by bmanderson
    As muscles fatigue during a set, hitting them again by following up with another set, or another exercise, with little or no rest, will hit them harder, all things being equal.
    in my limited understanding of physiology I can see nothing here that would be any different than simply doubling reps in a given set...

  2. #27
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    The only physiological model I can see for hitting muscles again in different exercises (say following bench with flies and then with incline dumbels) rather than just doing double the reps or whatever would be that the varying angles produce different loading patters which demand different motor end plate activations. This will see different fibers in the same muscle groups stimulated hypertrophically (hopefully) and thus lead to a higher % of the muscle getting set up for growth/trauma protection.

    Im real interested in the cns role of failure/hypertrophic growth and how failure can hinder it. Im going to dig deeper and get in way over my head no doubt.

    Augs
    Last edited by Augury; 06-24-2004 at 06:17 PM.

  3. #28
    Senior Member geoffgarcia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Augury
    The only physiological model I can see for hitting muscles again in different exercises (say following bench with flies and then with incline dumbels) rather than just doing double the reps or whatever would be that the varying angles produce different loading patters which demand different motor end plate activations. This will see different fibers in the same muscle groups stimulated hypertrophically (hopefully) and thus lead to a higher % of the muscle getting set up for growth/trauma protection.
    and this would not occur simply by doing the various exercises after a full rest?

  4. #29
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    your right. it would. I wasnt thinking big picture.

    So what are the advantages then to effectively doing a supersetted workout? Lemee just shoot some ideas up...

    Possible buildup of lactic acid due to hammering agonist/antagonist groups with little to no rest. (my reasoning being that even when training an antagonist group the agonist goes tense for stabilization)

    Keeps you warm and prevents potential injury

    Bulids stamina/raises heart rate

    saves a sackload of time

    Honestly, upon reviewing this, I think the time element is the biggest plus. Its the sole reason I do it. I dont wanna be in there 3 hours. Also if you are in the gym too long you lose the hour window for maximal growth. (was it cortisol? i cant remeber the chemical).

    Augs

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmanderson
    "assuming a person is lifting to increase muscle size or strength...and not improve metabolic condition..."

    It would still work for building size and strength, if the work is done progressively. Some might argue it would work better.

    As muscles fatigue during a set, hitting them again by following up with another set, or another exercise, with little or no rest, will hit them harder, all things being equal.
    But this is not a superset. You don't hit the same muscles again "with little or no rest". For example you do a chest exercise then a back exercise and then rest.
    Last edited by Songsangnim; 06-25-2004 at 08:59 AM.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Augury
    The only physiological model I can see for hitting muscles again in different exercises (say following bench with flies and then with incline dumbels) rather than just doing double the reps or whatever would be that the varying angles produce different loading patters which demand different motor end plate activations. This will see different fibers in the same muscle groups stimulated hypertrophically (hopefully) and thus lead to a higher % of the muscle getting set up for growth/trauma protection.

    Im real interested in the cns role of failure/hypertrophic growth and how failure can hinder it. Im going to dig deeper and get in way over my head no doubt.

    Augs
    But this is not a superset, but a giant (or tri) set. A superset is hitting two bodyparts together, whereas a giant set is hitting the same bodypart repeatedly with little or no rest between exercises.
    Last edited by Songsangnim; 06-25-2004 at 09:03 AM.

  7. #32
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    Well, to clear up what I meant, I was referring to 'pre-exhaustion' type techniques, not supersetting. I tend not to use either label, but you gotta over the internet. Sorry for being unclear.

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