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Thread: optimal HIIT routine?

  1. #1
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    optimal HIIT routine?

    Hi, i have read lots about HIIT on this board (search) but none of the posts give an optimal routine. What do you guys consider the best routine for someone who is cutting up lifting and trying to burn some fat?

    how many days a week?
    how many sets (say one set is a sprint followed by a jog)

    and how many seconds?

    thanks, there is alot of good info here but im having trouble putting it all togeather into a good HIIT routine.
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  2. #2
    GONNA GET BIG
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    one of my favs goes like this

    warm up jog for 4 minutes
    sprint 20 sec
    jog 60 sec
    sprint 20 sec
    jog 60 sec
    sprint 20 sec
    jog 60 sec
    sprint 20 sec
    jog 60 sec
    sprint 20 sec
    jog 60 sec
    spint 20 sec
    jog 4 minutes

    i do this routine twice a week. if 20 sec is to much start at 15 or maybe even 10
    good luck

  3. #3
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    Powerman, Aka, etc will be much more an authority on this than me, but I think that the ideal way to perform HIIT is to sprint as hard/fast as possible for 15 seconds (15 seconds is important, I wouldn't go over). After that walk for 30 seconds to 1 minute 15 seconds or so (it goes by surprisingly fast). Repeat.

    (Of course you'll want to warm-up for a couple minutes and cool down for a couple minutes. Stretch dynamically after your warm-up and do static stretches after your cool down).

    I think a good number of sprints to start with is 4. It will keep you from being horribly sore the day after. Every week I would add another sprint until you feel unable to add anymore.

    I think ideally HIIT should be done twice a week with an endurance cardio day (I'd recommend biking here for the low impact) and something like a MaxOT Cardio day (running as hard as you can for about 16 minutes).
    Last edited by KingJustin; 06-09-2004 at 04:31 PM.

  4. #4
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    I would say 1-2 times/week, 10-15 "sets" per workout, and a set would be a 10-15 second sprint followed by a 30-60 second jog. Make sure to warm-up and cool down for a reasonable length of time too to avoid injury.

  5. #5
    I wannabebig!
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    I think a good place to start out with is maybe 15 minutes with either 1min/1min or 30/30 30/45... whatever you personally would like to do, and once you can complete 15 then add additional intervals, if 15 is too much for you try starting at 10 mintues and so on and so forth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ryuage
    I think a good place to start out with is maybe 15 minutes with either 1min/1min or 30/30 30/45... whatever you personally would like to do, and once you can complete 15 then add additional intervals, if 15 is too much for you try starting at 10 mintues and so on and so forth.
    HIIT involves sprinting, whether it be in the form of running, cycling, swimming, whatever. A true sprint cannot last for a minute, or even 30 seconds.

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    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    I would be interested in seeing anyone but a world class athlete be able to sprint for 15 seconds and then jog 30 and repeat 15 times as well.

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    no where in the acronym HIIT does it say sprinting, it's high intensity interval training. now high intensity intervals followed by a less intense rest interval would be sufficient and serve the same purpose.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bizatch
    I would be interested in seeing anyone but a world class athlete be able to sprint for 15 seconds and then jog 30 and repeat 15 times as well.
    "Sprint" is relative. I might be able to run 100 m in 10 seconds at the start of my workout, and it might take me 12 seconds at the end of my workout, but in both cases I'm going full out.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryuage
    no where in the acronym HIIT does it say sprinting, it's high intensity interval training. now high intensity intervals followed by a less intense rest interval would be sufficient and serve the same purpose.
    Sufficient? Yes. Optimal? Probably not. Without looking anything up, I was under the impression that a full out sprint would induce whatever it is that we're trying to induce (output of certain hormones, increased metabolic rate, etc.) moreso than would something in the 85-95% range. I might very well be talking out of my ass here, but I'm almost positive I'm correct.

  11. #11
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    Originally posted by aka23

    If the intervals were sufficient intensity, then yes, I would consider it HIIT. You can do HIIT on a cycling machine, on a treadmill, on an elliptical trainer, on a 400m track, or in any other environment that is provides sufficient intensity. I consider this intensity to be high enough that you quickly get out of breath and cannot continue for more than a couple of minutes without lowering the intensity. For many people this is about 85% MHR or more.

    Several of the key HIIT studies were done on cycling machines. The one that I have seen most frequently quoted is the Tremblay "Impact of exercise intensity on body fatness and skeletal muscle metabolism", which is summarized at http://www.exrx.net/FatLoss/HIITvsET.html . This study was done on cycling machines. The HIIT group did traditional cardio for the first 5 weeks. I assume this was to get in shape for the HIIT. After week 5 the HIIT started off with 15 second intevals on a cycling machine at 60% max 10 second output and 60 second intervals at 70% max 90 second output. The duration and intensity of the intervals increased as the weeks went on. The HIIT group lost more than 3x as much fat (as measured by skinfolds) as the endurance training group even though they burned less than half the calories during the activity.

    Having said that, many of these studies were done with untrained persons who can easily get their HR to high levels on a cycling machine. I find it quite difficult to get my HR up to high levels while on a cycling machine. Below are graphs of my heart rate during interval training on a treadmill and a cycling machine. The treadmill involved 15 one min high/one min low intervals. I was able to get my HR up to 97% of estimated maximum by the 13th interval. The cycling involved 3 hill programs with 90 second intervals, 60 second intervals, and 30 second intervals. I was only able to get my heart rate up to about 80% of estimated maximum on the cycling machines.

  12. #12
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    Ok, so my first statement "HIIT involves sprinting" is incorrect. Aka's post doesn't do anything to disqualify my statement that going at 100% of MHR is going to produce better results than going at 85-95%.

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    I run for about 35-40 minutes 6 times per week. Is it a good idea to replace every one of those sessions with an HITT session? Would it speed up the process (of getting lean)?
    ...and miles to go before I sleep, and miles to go before I sleep...

  14. #14
    Senior Member geoffgarcia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vido
    A true sprint cannot last for a minute, or even 30 seconds.
    ..if your out of shape...

  15. #15
    Banned KingJustin's Avatar
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    I don't recall any studies showing or even hinting that 100% MHR is less beneficial than 85% MHR, however I don't believe there's been a single study that shows the lower % of MHR was more beneficial than the higher in any case (as far as fat burning is concerned).

    Thus, I think it would be logical to conclude that the higher the intensity the shorter you can keep up the intensity, however the more calories will be burned after the activity.

    Also, I know that you won't be sprinting as fast, obviously by the 15th sprint, but I don't believe you could run at 100% intensity for that many sprints with that little rest without passing out or just being too out of breathe to keep it up.

    I agree that you can easily sprint for 30 seconds all out if you are in excellent shape. 1 minute is possible, but most people that can truly sprint for 1 minute are probably world class athletes as the world record 100m dash is around 9 seconds, and nobody has broken 36 seconds or come very close to it in a 400m run (I don't think).

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    The whole goal is to rev the metabolism through a cyclic type of activity. I will outline three specific methods for utilizing this, and I will do so for one complete cycle, using track running as the example. This is based on someone who is in general aerobic conditioning. But I will outline it for others as well after the guidline.

    Step One - Arrive at the track, and warm up by walking for a minute briskly, followed by a nice stretch

    Step Two - Let the games begin! You will lightly jog to begin for one minute. This will probably utilize 50 percent of your total capacity to train.

    Step Three - Raise the pace of the jogging for the following 60 seconds. This should follow closely to 60 percent of your maximum capacity to run.

    Step Four - Raise this up one more level to approximately 70 percent of your capacity for a minute

    Step Five - Repeat to 80 for one minute

    Set Six - Repeat to 90 percent for one minute

    Step Seven - Go all out for one minute!

    That is one cycle, now at this stage, if not accustomed to interval training, you will simply cool down for two minutes and hit the showers. However, if you are accustomed, you will repeat the cycle one more time. That would last for 16 all out minutes. However, some take it to twenty. In this case, I recommend a half cycle for the third go around, like this

  17. #17
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    I do two kinds



    First, 1 minute walk (5.5kph) then 1 minute run (20kph), repeat for 30 minutes, sometimes i put an incline on the treadmill




    Another i do is outside, warm up, go for all out sprint till you fatigue into a jog.. Walk for 2 minutes, sprint again... Do this 4 times


    Its murder on your feet thou

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