The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness
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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

By: Nick Tumminello Added: January 6th, 2014
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  1. #1
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    A few questions for Aka if you dont mind...

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Augury
    Good reading that post Aka. Particularly interesting was the study of the people on 50% more carbs than needed. I did wonder about the reality of partitioning when carb loading and if those pesky carbs were trully going to glycogen storage or just gettig burned in preference to fat. I guess thats why during carb loading keeping fat intake under tight control is very important.

    "The abstract mentions that, "Whole-body CHO oxidation increased sixfold and fat oxidation decreased > 90% on surplus CHO diets." When carb loading, the body increases carbohydrate oxidation and decreases fat oxidation. More carbohydrates are being stored, while more carbs are bening burned. The fat that you consume is stored, while fat burning slows down. In this way fat balance may increases during a positive calorie balance even though carbs are not being converted to fat. This is one of the reasons for keeping fat intake low while refeeding. If fat intake is low while carb intake is a high and calorie balance is high, then the carbs will refill glycogen reserves and fat balance will not increase as much as would be predicted by calorie balance during the transient refeed.

    Similarly if you burn carbs during cardio, glycogen stores decrease. This causes fat oxidation to increase and CHO oxidation to decrease during the period while glycogen stores remain low. In this way burning carbs during cardio can cause you to lose as much body fat as burning fat during cardio. If anything the higher intensity carb-burning cardio would have a small advantage due to things like nutrient partitioning and AMPK activation."

    I felt the thread that was posted on was closed so i started this one. Aka, what are your thoughts on low carb diets then? You mentioned that there is fat storage during carbloading due to CHO burning. Do you feel the opposite is true? on low carb diets (sub 100g per day) especially backed up with depletion specific exercises to keep the muscles depleted that fat burning will be the functional choice for the body? If protein is high (1g per lb) then do you think protein gets burned preferentially to fat?

    Just curious on your thoughts.
    Regards Augs.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member aka23's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Augury
    Do you feel the opposite is true? on low carb diets (sub 100g per day) especially backed up with depletion specific exercises to keep the muscles depleted that fat burning will be the functional choice for the body?
    Yes. A low carb diet and glycogen-depleting exercise would increase fat oxidation. An increased proportion of CHO intake would go towards refilling the low glycogen reserves, instead of providing energy. I believe that such techniques can be effective at increasing fat mobilization. Note that if calorie balance is unchanged, then fat intake and total fat stored would probably increase, resulting in little change in fat balance.

    Quote Originally Posted by Augury
    If protein is high (1g per lb) then do you think protein gets burned preferentially to fat?
    Under normal dietary conditions a large portion of protein is deanimated into nitrogen and a carbon skeleton. The liver converts most of the carbon skeletons into glucose. If protein intake is high, a larger portion of this protein would likely be converted into glucose. I expect that this glucose would primarily be used to refill the depleted glycogen reserves in the conditions described above.
    Last edited by aka23; 06-13-2004 at 03:11 AM.

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