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The Five Biggest Contradictions in Fitness

Itís no secret that when people contradict themselves, it has the effect of making the flaws in their actions or statements seem glaringly obvious. But what about when WE ourselves get caught contradicting ourselves by someone else?

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Thread: raw eggs

  1. #1
    WannabeBUFF Member buffzilla's Avatar
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    raw eggs

    Is salmonella common in free range eggs in the UK? I wan't to start drinking eggs hardcore rocky style.:alcoholic Even if I get salmonella its not going to kill a beef monster in his 20's is it?
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  3. #2
    Senior Member geoffgarcia's Avatar
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    Salmonella is an infection caused by a gram-negative bacillus, a germ of the Salmonella genus. Infection with these bacteria may involve only the intestinal tract, or may spread from the intestines to the blood stream and then to other body sites. The source of infection is contaminated food or water, or close contact with other human beings carrying the infection.

    SYMPTOMS AND DIAGNOSIS
    Symptoms can vary greatly from person to person, may occur 12-72 hours after ingestion of contaminated food or water and may last 4-7 days. Most individuals experience two or more of the following symptoms: onset of severe headaches, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, low grade fever and muscle aches. Some individuals experience no symptoms but harbor the bacteria in their intestines and are at risk of spreading it to other individuals. A diagnosis of Salmonella infection is made by testing a stool specimen for the presence of the bacteria.

    TRANSMISSION
    Salmonella live in the intestinal tracts of humans and other animals including birds, and are transmitted by the oral-fecal route. This means eating foods contaminated with animal feces. Contaminated foods usually look and smell normal. They are often of animal origin, such as beef, poultry, milk, or eggs, but all foods, including vegetables may become contaminated.

    Person-to-person transmission can also occur. Individuals who carry Salmonella in their intestines may transmit Salmonella to another individual if good personal hygiene is not followed. For example, an infected food handler may transmit the Salmonella bacteria if he/she does not wash his/her hands after using the bathroom and before handling or preparing food. Transmission may also occur by handling pet turtles, baby chicks, frogs and snails that harbor the Salmonella bacteria.

    TREATMENT
    Severe forms of Salmonella infection may require hospitalization and isolation from other people. Patients with less severe infection and those who are recovering may be treated at home.

    Get plenty of rest until fever, diarrhea and any other symptoms have been gone for three days.

    Eat five or six small meals daily. Follow a progressive diet (clear liquids to full liquids to soft foods) as recommended by your provider.

    Use self-care measures such as comfortable room temperature and fresh air. You may wish to try a hot water bottle for stomach cramps.

    Symptomatic treatment with acetaminophen (Tylenol or similar product) for pain and fever is usually all that is required.

    Antibiotics generally are not recommended unless the infection has spread from the intestines, because such medication can prolong rather than reduce the period of bacterial shedding in the intestine.

    Individuals usually feel better within 5-7 days.

    People who have Salmonellosis should not prepare food or pour water for others until they have been shown to no longer be carrying the Salmonella bacterium. Individuals working with food or in a health care facility, or day care center must have two negative stool cultures at least 72 hours apart before being allowed to return to work.

    PREVENTION AND CONTROL
    Good personal hygiene and handwashing techniques would prevent the majority of these transmissions. Wash hands thoroughly with warm, soapy water after visits to the restroom and before food preparation. Salmonella usually remains in the intestines for up to five weeks - and in some cases for many months. Be aware that some individuals can become chronic carriers of Salmonella bacteria and about 2% may develop chronic arthritis.
    A study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture earlier this year (Risk Analysis April 2002 22(2):203-18) showed that of the 69 billion eggs produced annually, only 2.3 million of them are contaminated with salmonella.

    So simple math suggests that only 0.00003 percent of eggs are infected. The translation is that only one in every 30,000 eggs is contaminated with salmonella. This gives you an idea of how uncommon this problem actually is.

    Guidelines To Ensure That You Are Consuming Fresh High- Quality Eggs

    1 Always check the freshness of the egg right before you consume the yolk.

    2 If you are uncertain about the freshness of an egg, don't eat it. This is one of the best safeguards against salmonella infection.

    3 If there is a crack in the shell, don't eat it. You can easily check for this by immersing the egg in a pan of cool, salted water. If the egg emits a tiny stream of bubbles, don't consume it as the shell is porous/contains a hole.

    4 If you are getting your eggs fresh from a farmer it is best to not refrigerate them. This is the way most of the world stores their eggs; they do not refrigerate them. To properly judge the freshness of an egg, its contents need to be at room temperature. Eggs that are stored in the fridge and opened immediately after taking them out will seem fresher than they actually are. Eggs that you want to check the freshness of should be kept outside the fridge for at least an hour prior to opening them.

    5 First, check all the eggs by rolling them across a flat surface. Only consume them if they roll wobbly.

    6 Open the egg. If the egg white is watery instead of gel-like, don't consume the egg. If the egg yolk is not convex and firm, don't consume the egg. If the egg yolk easily bursts, don't consume the egg.

    7 After opening the egg you can put it up to your nose and smell it. If it smells foul you will certainly not want to consume it.

    How to Start Using Raw Eggs

    If you are not used to eating fresh raw egg yolks or fresh raw fish, you should start by eating just a tiny bit of it on a daily basis, and then gradually increase the portions.

    For example, start by consuming only a few drops of raw egg yolk a day for the first three days. Gradually increase the amount that you consume in three-day increments. Try half a teaspoon for three days, then one teaspoon, then two teaspoons. When you are accustomed to that amount, increase it to one raw egg yolk per day and subsequently to two raw egg yolks per day. Eventually, you can easily eat five raw egg yolks daily.

    Fresh raw egg yolk tastes like vanilla and is best combined with your vegetable pulp. You can also combine it with avocado. Only stir it gently with a fork, because egg protein easily gets damaged on a molecular level, even by mixing/blending.
    Last edited by geoffgarcia; 07-13-2004 at 01:04 PM.

  4. #3
    Senior Member meltedtime's Avatar
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    From what I understand you need to cook eggs in order to digest the protein, otherwise it is a waste. Cooking increases the bioavailability of the protein. Also, severe salmonella poisoning can land you in the hospital. Why bother with the raw eggs? Could make you sick and the protein is not as easy for your body to digest and use.



    melt

    ***and you can read Geoff's post above. (damn speedy posters)
    Last edited by meltedtime; 07-13-2004 at 01:08 PM.
    Opinions are like ***holes, everybody has one.

    There are three kinds of lies - lies, damned lies and statistics. ~Benjamin Disraeli

  5. #4
    WannabeBUFF Member buffzilla's Avatar
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    Wow Geofgarcia, that was the best answer ever!!!
    Last edited by buffzilla; 07-13-2004 at 01:07 PM.
    Statistics:

    Weight - 171lbs
    Height - 6'1''

  6. #5
    Senior Member TheGimp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGimp
    Here's a couple of studies about needing to cook eggs to aid the protein digestibility:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...t_uids=9772141

    The true ileal digestibility of cooked and raw egg protein amounted to 90.9 +/- 0.8 and 51.3 +/- 9.8%, respectively.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=10564098

    The other downside of eating raw eggs is biotin deficiency as the avidin in the raw egg binds to it.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=10846444

    Biotin deficiency in humans is extremely rare and is generally associated with prolonged parenteral nutrition, the consumption of large quantities of avidin, usually in the form of raw eggs, severe malnutrition and, inherited metabolic disorders.
    And of course salmonella. The risk is very low, but why take the risk for worse protein availability? The only reason I can think of is convenience. In that case just get yourself some egg protein powder.

  7. #6
    HardGainer
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    Raw Egg Whites

    Hi everyone, I am new to these forums, but I have just recently come across a product that solves the salmonela problem. It is pasturized eggwhites. Good news is that they are 100% Bio-Available. You can get it from http://www.eggwhitesint.com/ . I just placed my first order for em. If anyone has used this let me know what you think.

  8. #7
    mind/body zen's Avatar
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    A study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture earlier this year (Risk Analysis April 2002 22(2):203-18) showed that of the 69 billion eggs produced annually, only 2.3 million of them are contaminated with salmonella.

    So simple math suggests that only 0.00003 percent of eggs are infected. The translation is that only one in every 30,000 eggs is contaminated with salmonella. This gives you an idea of how uncommon this problem actually is.

    hmmm, well if he does raw eggs rocky style, he's gonna be doing 3 to 6 eggs per serving.
    So lets assume he does only 4 eggs and only once per day.
    That comes out to 28 eggs per week, and if you stay on the rocky plan for a year, that adds up to 1460 eggs in a year. That gives you nearly a 5% chance of get salmonella. It doesn't really sound like playng to lottery anymore, does it?

  9. #8
    B16 vtec Shabaz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zen
    hmmm, well if he does raw eggs rocky style, he's gonna be doing 3 to 6 eggs per serving.
    So lets assume he does only 4 eggs and only once per day.
    That comes out to 28 eggs per week, and if you stay on the rocky plan for a year, that adds up to 1460 eggs in a year. That gives you nearly a 5% chance of get salmonella. It doesn't really sound like playng to lottery anymore, does it?

    That's not true. When he eats his 1461st egg his odds of that egg having salmonela is still 0.00003 percent.

    Its like playing roulette at the casino and putting your money on 1 number (seven). Theoretical statistics says that the number 7 will hit once every 36 spins of the ball. Meaning if 7 hasn't hit in 35 spins, then according to your theory, 7 will have a 100% chance of hitting on the next spin.

    obviously not true.

    it's like playing a lottery with 1/30,000 odds every egg you consume, but hoping to loose every time, and NOT win.

    remember that the odds are not cumulative, and are only theoretical
    Last edited by Shabaz; 07-13-2004 at 04:55 PM.
    In war it's not who's right. It's who's left.

  10. #9
    I wannabebig!
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    why risk the chance.... and why take them raw unless you enjoy the taste heh..

  11. #10
    Senior Member shootermcgavin7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shabaz
    That's not true. When he eats his 1461st egg his odds of that egg having salmonela is still 0.00003 percent.

    Its like playing roulette at the casino and putting your money on 1 number (seven). Theoretical statistics says that the number 7 will hit once every 36 spins of the ball. Meaning if 7 hasn't hit in 35 spins, then according to your theory, 7 will have a 100% chance of hitting on the next spin.

    obviously not true.

    it's like playing a lottery with 1/30,000 odds every egg you consume, but hoping to loose every time, and NOT win.

    remember that the odds are not cumulative, and are only theoretical


    You're the kind of guy that casino owners in Vegas LOVE.

  12. #11
    zen idiot Scott S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zen
    hmmm, well if he does raw eggs rocky style, he's gonna be doing 3 to 6 eggs per serving.
    So lets assume he does only 4 eggs and only once per day.
    That comes out to 28 eggs per week, and if you stay on the rocky plan for a year, that adds up to 1460 eggs in a year. That gives you nearly a 5% chance of get salmonella. It doesn't really sound like playng to lottery anymore, does it?

    The problem being that if he eats those 1460 eggs per year raw, he's only getting about 730 eggs worth of bioavailable protein. Would you drink over 700 raw eggs per year for... nothing?

  13. #12
    Wannabebig New Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shabaz
    That's not true. When he eats his 1461st egg his odds of that egg having salmonela is still 0.00003 percent.

    Its like playing roulette at the casino and putting your money on 1 number (seven). Theoretical statistics says that the number 7 will hit once every 36 spins of the ball. Meaning if 7 hasn't hit in 35 spins, then according to your theory, 7 will have a 100% chance of hitting on the next spin.

    obviously not true.

    it's like playing a lottery with 1/30,000 odds every egg you consume, but hoping to loose every time, and NOT win.

    remember that the odds are not cumulative, and are only theoretical

    this is completely wrong. i got this account just to say that. you'd fail probability with this kind of knowledge. the first guy was right. if something is x% risky how would your risk NOT increase if you did it again and again?

    if you don't get it think of a coin. if you flip it twice do you really think the odds getting heads at least once is the same as if you flip it once? if you do think that just try it out with a coin and pen and paper. the odds of heads is 50% so what are the odds getting heads at least once in two flips? i'll tell you. the odds of getting heads at least once is equal to the odds of not getting tails both times. 1 - (.5 x .5) = .75. it's the same with the eggs. just different numbers. the odds of not getting whatever rare disease in one temptation of fate is .999. In two tries it will be 1-(.999 x .999) etc. the number in the parentheses keeps getting smaller so your risk keeps getting bigger.

    i maybe a math loser but i had to do this. don't gamble dude. just don't.
    anyway, not really that into bodybuilding so i'll probably never post here again. enjoy.

  14. #13
    One crazy MOFO/Mail man
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    The probability of you getting salminila from one egg is are equivilant to independant bernoulli trails (so the probibilty does not change). But the probability of you getting salminaila from eggs that you have eatten is a function of the number of eggs eatten.
    w00t

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